Can Rcs Lose The Saddle Without Being Berried?

Triton25

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I searched and maybe I didn’t search correct terms, but I couldn’t find an answer.

I have had a 5gal planted tank running for over month, and had RCS for right at a month. Several I purchased already had a saddle. One in particular molted two weeks ago and I watched what I think is a male cling to her back and then they went into the grassy hiding area. I did not witness belly to belly mating. Anyhow, two weeks have gone by without her becoming “berried” and I’m pretty sure she has lost her saddle. So, my question is do the eggs in their saddle get “old” and they dump them to generate new eggs? Or could she have tried to pass them to her swimmerets and lost them? Is she getting too old? I never saw anything resembling eggs in the tank. Thanks in advance!
 

Demeter

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Once they are ready to breed after molting they will be berried shortly after. I’d guess your female did not breed so the eggs were inferile. Females will drop the eggs within a couple days if they are not fertile.
 
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Triton25

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Ok that does make sense, but can’t they also keep the saddles for a long time-even with molting? I have several females with saddles since I bought them (abt a month ago). I think all have molted at least once but I’ve only ever seen the one female act like she was ready to mate. I know I have to be patient but it’s hard!
 

Demeter

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They aren’t ready whenever they have a saddle, it just means the eggs are developing. Once the saddles are very large that’s when their close.

Not sure if they are capable of deciding when they want to lay eggs. If so then I wish I could control my own biological clock
 

richie.p

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When the saddle is formed it means a the eggs are in the ovaries they will stay there until she moults when this happenes she leaves off a pheromone to attract the male, mating takes a split second you may think they crashed into each other that's how quick it is, after mating it can take up to 10 days for her to pass the eggs down to the swimmerets in doing so the eggs go through the sperm making them fertile, they will stay in the swimmerets for up to 30 days before they hatch, many young females drop their eggs first time through bad parenting. If she dosnt mate after moulting the eggs will stay there.
 
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Triton25

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When the saddle is formed it means a the eggs are in the ovaries they will stay there until she moults when this happenes she leaves off a pheromone to attract the male, mating takes a split second you may think they crashed into each other that's how quick it is, after mating it can take up to 10 days for her to pass the eggs down to the swimmerets in doing so the eggs go through the sperm making them fertile, they will stay in the swimmerets for up to 30 days before they hatch, many young females drop their eggs first time through bad parenting. If she dosnt mate after moulting the eggs will stay there.
Thanks. I’ve tried to do my research to understand all of that I just couldn’t find anything about them losing the eggs in their saddle, unless they mated but dropped them—so maybe that’s the only way. Or, how long they will keep a saddle before mating—I read somewhere a person had a shrimp with a saddle for at least six months, while some say their shrimp are berried again within days having hatching their previous clutch. So, my take away is that the time frame can vary greatly. I understand that several conditions have to be right for them to breed, so I’m trying to be patient. Since I bought her with a saddle already present, with no idea for how long, I was mainly wondering if they would discard eggs after x amount time bc they were “old”?
 

SegiDream

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I would think they would drop eggs if they were infertile or it's a new mother or they molted while still berried. I have seen a couple new mother shrimps drop their entire "clutch" of eggs. I actually have 1 young orange rili shrimp right now that dropped every egg except for 1. It just takes time for them to mature and the right conditions for it to be successful. Hopefully you will have a berried female fairly soon.

Shrimp Reproduction .:. An explanation of the reproduction cycle of a Freshwater Aquarium Shrimp
 
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Triton25

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I would think they would drop eggs if they were infertile or it's a new mother or they molted while still berried. I have seen a couple new mother shrimps drop their entire "clutch" of eggs. I actually have 1 young orange rili shrimp right now that dropped every egg except for 1. It just takes time for them to mature and the right conditions for it to be successful. Hopefully you will have a berried female fairly soon.

Shrimp Reproduction .:. An explanation of the reproduction cycle of a Freshwater Aquarium Shrimp
Thank you!
 
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