Can i re test my aquarrium

Rantarzalt

Member

dmk164

Member
yep
 
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Rantarzalt

Member
Ok thanks
 

RayClem

Member
The ideal method is to wash the test tube thoroughly in tap water, then rinse it out in a sample of aquarium water you are planning to test, dump that rinse water out and refill the test tube to the mark with the aquarium water. That way, you know the only thing in the tube is the solution to be tested.

Tissue paper is manufactured with a variety of chemical additives designed to impart specific characteristics (absorbency, softness, etc.) to the product. Some may contain colorants or even lotions. It could even have residual traces of bleaching chemicals. I have no idea whether these chemicals might affect the test, so I would not recommend it. If you want to dry the test tubes before storing them, the tissue paper is OK, but I just leave mine wet.
 

MacZ

Member
RayClem said:
Tissue paper is manufactured with a variety of chemical additives designed to impart specific characteristics (absorbency, softness, etc.) to the product. Some may contain colorants or even lotions. It could even have residual traces of bleaching chemicals. I have no idea whether these chemicals might affect the test, so I would not recommend it. If you want to dry the test tubes before storing them, the tissue paper is OK, but I just leave mine wet.
Tipp: Kitchen paper towels without print, unbleached or chlorine-free bleached actually should not impact the testing. It's the stuff used in laboratories here.
 

RayClem

Member
MacZ said:
Tipp: Kitchen paper towels without print, unbleached or chlorine-free bleached actually should not impact the testing. It's the stuff used in laboratories here.

Yes, I know that Kimberly Clark makes a product called KimWipes and KimTech that are designed without additives so they will be safe for laboratory use. I suspect European paper manufacturers like Stora Enzo do as well. However, I would not use standard toilet tissue, towel paper or facial tissue for that purpose.

By the way- I spent my entire 41 year career as an engineer in the paper industry, so I am quite familiar with the entire process.
 

Aprilbeingbasic

Member
Suggestions above are a bit overboard hahaha rinse in tap water and reuse the tube. The amount of anything left over will be tiny, just give it a shake to get out droplets. Honestly the are colour indicators anyway which have quite a bit of leeway
 

MacZ

Member
RayClem said:
Yes, I know that Kimberly Clark makes a product called KimWipes and KimTech that are designed without additives so they will be safe for laboratory use. I suspect European paper manufacturers like Stora Enzo do as well. However, I would not use standard toilet tissue, towel paper or facial tissue for that purpose.

By the way- I spent my entire 41 year career as an engineer in the paper industry, so I am quite familiar with the entire process.
And guess who's family sold the paper in their stationary store.

European manufacturers have a lot of regulations especially due to environmental reasons. Many brands (and store-owned brands, which are the norm here, actually) of any paper including writing paper have to stick to basically two-three ingredient processes.
Most paper including paper tissues of all kinds here is 100% cellulose, unless otherwise specified on the package. So you usually don't have any hidden ingredients. Only things that can be removed again during the manufacturing process by more than about 98% (don't pin me on the exact number) don't have to be written on the packaging and such trace-amounts shouldn't be a problem for testing.

While yes, some labs use certain types of towels, they are the same types available and often used by people at home. Mostly because it's cheaper.

But yes, if in doubt I'd stay clear of any products that are intended to be used on the human body.
 

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