Can I Keep Two Female Betta Fish Together In A Large Tank?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by ViolentRainbow, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. ViolentRainbow

    ViolentRainbowNew MemberMember

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    I have a 35 gallon tank and I bought two tiny female betta fish from the pet store today, they were kept together at the store in a small tank maybe 3 gallons in size and they seemed to not fight at the store and when I brought them home and put them in my tank they stuck together and explored the whole tank together and when they got separated they would swim around quickly looking for each other but a few hours later I noticed one was chasing the other around! Is this going to stop or get worse? I figured they would get along since they look like sister fish and have lived together already in a much smaller tank is this tank big enough for them both to live in or should I remove one?
     
  2. kallililly1973

    kallililly1973Fishlore VIPMember

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    I've never tried it but others have sororities that have worked. They could be establishing territory. I would keep a close eye on them and if the chasing continues and possible damage occurs obviously relocate one asap. Good Luck!
     
  3. Carmen79

    Carmen79New MemberMember

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    Yes. Very important to keep a close eye on them. Given their shared past, this attempt could work out, or, it could as well so easily fail.

    Look for the typical signs of agression. Continuous chasing, nipping, fin damage. When it gets too far, you need to separate them.
    Have a cycled 5 gallon tank prepared in the event it occurs.

    To help it work, have your 35 gallon heavily planted. Either with real plants, or just decorations. These to break up he lines of sight, and prevent the bad outcomes from the chasings. In my experience floating plants do a lot.

    Give them something else to hunt, live food works nicely.

    Ideally you could create a sorority, with a total of ~ 5 female bettas. This would help distribute the agression and a pecking order can be established. Here again, a close supervision is required, to asses the agression levels. High risk, as you'd need extra cycled tanks ready for the case when one of them is being bullied.

    This process requires most of all supervision and preparation.
     
  4. Feohw

    FeohwWell Known MemberMember

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    I had 5 and they would still chase and nip. With just two all the aggression will be towards the less dominant betta. So it's best to have 5+ to divide aggression. If you want this to work well get lots of plants for them. Sororities can go wrong all of a sudden, while they work it can be stressful on the fish and you, but if it is done right it can be amazing. More females and plants will go towards that.
     
  5. jdhef

    jdhefModeratorModerator Member

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    I agree with separating them. As they mature they will most likely become more aggressive towards one another. Generally when trying to keep females together, you put several of them in a tank, that way the aggression gets spread out. But that doesn't always work out so it is best suited for a very experience aquarist.
     
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