can i convert my aquaruim?

chazzi13

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I have an aquarium on one of those nice stands with the cupboards unedrneath and the matching cover for on top of the tank (sorry, not sure what to call it so everyone would understand). its under 12 months old and I was wondering if it could be converted into a terranium. it measures 122cmL 36cmW and 48cmD and hold approx. 216 litres of water. it is top-opening with 5 pieces of glass (one permanently attatched in the centre and 2 pieces either side which are removable) they are a secure fit and are quite heavy so I don't think there is any risk of escape. input from anyone would be greatly appreciated. I found a website which I wrote to asking the same question but they never replied and I just can't seem to find any answers anywhere else on the internet. thanks.
 

angelfish220

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You could do it but it would depend on the type of reptile you wanted. the main problem is these are airbreathing animals and with that much glass it is hard to get good air circulation going.
 
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chazzi13

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gee I never thought of that. what would I do? just make the top mesh or something? oh and I intend on keeping a snake for sure. could I use the light I already have for the aquaruI'm as well as some sort of basking light or would I have to buy all new equipment?
 

Lucy

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Some places sell fitted screens just for this use.
 

Narcicius

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as logn as the pet you want isn't to big for the tank any aquarium can house reptiles. So go for it as long as its not a komodo or something like that.
 
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chazzi13

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at the moment I'm just thinking of starting off with an australian carpet python maybe. I don't know anyone else who is interested in keeping reptiles so I'm finding it a bit challenging to do all the research and find the right answers to my questions. anyone have any suggestions as to what type of snake is good for a beginner?
 

Narcicius

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All are about the same, its more based on what you can afford to feed them. Smaller snakes eat rats or "mice", while other larger snakes eat rabbits atleast every week. So whatever you can feed would be nice, as long as the tank is bug enough.
 

Rbacchiega

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216 L is equal to about 50 gallons for arguments sake, so it would be for a carpet python, but they aren't the easiest snake to start out with ( I breed pythons, boas and various other snakes and reptiles)

Also, what are you looking for in a snake (funny question I know) But if you want something you can hold on a fairly regular basis, that won't try to tag you every time you put your hand in the tank, a carpet python might not be the best one for you....some do eventually tame down with regular handling, but be prepairedto be bitten...if you want something you can hold but still gets a fair size, look at ball pythons or boas...

and what you feed depends on the size, but I'll help you with that once you know what snake you want.
 
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chazzi13

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I would like something that is going to be happy with regular handling.as well as being handled by me I also want to get my family more involved and more accepting of snakes and reptiles. my mum has never held any sort of reptile before so she is still under the impression that they are slimy and horrible which they are far from. I think they are beautiful!
 

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Ball Pythons would be your best bet then. They can get a decent size *up to 4 feet or larger* and are fairly calm with handling, especially if you get them while they are young. Do some research on them and definitely try to get one that is already eating ft (frozen, thawed) mice. Not only will this be easier on you (*less likely to strike, you can buy in bulk etc) but it is safer for the snake as well. I have one that was a rescue, it was fed live until a mouse bit its eye...now he's blind in that eye and is FINALLY eating frozen mice.
 

Narcicius

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That's pretty sad about the eye injury I never realized that mice could retaliate to such a creature, was the snake smaller when this happened.
 

Rbacchiega

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The snake was being fed appropriate sized rodents at the time (*I didn't own it then), but didn't strike right away...and the mouse wasn't removed, hence the bite....
 

Narcicius

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That didn't sound like a cheerful moment, I probably would've freaked out if my pet was hurt like that.
 

rileyrk190

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chazzi13 said:
gee I never thought of that. what would I do? just make the top mesh or something? oh and I intend on keeping a snake for sure. could I use the light I already have for the aquaruI'm as well as some sort of basking light or would I have to buy all new equipment?
You can use the existing light, but you need to make sure that you have a uva and uvb light bulb, which require a special dome, with a ceramic end to prevent overheating and fires. If you still need additional heat to house a reptile or amphibian, you can use a ceramic heat emitter which fits into the ceramic domes ( Heat rocks, are dangerous not only to your pet, but as well as have the potential to start fires). It's VERY important that they have both uva and uvb light, because without them they cannot produce vitamin D which allows them to process the calcium in their diet, causing them to get metobolic bone disease. I guess you could say that's similar to osteoporosis. Also you would need to make the top a mesh or screen because glass reflects uv light.
 

Narcicius

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I think Riley is a reptile speaking to us through the internet to let us know what reptiles really need in a home environment, that's the only logic I can derive from his rather thorough statement.
 

Rbacchiega

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if they are getting a snake, they do not require uva/uvb...as studies have shown it has little to no effect on snakes, because the majority are either crepuscular or nocturnal by nature, meaning they are active at dusk, dawn and during the night.

It depends on what type of lizard they get, if indeed they do get a lizard, which will determine if they need uva uvb as well. Nocturnal animals, such as a lot of geckos (with the exception of the madagascar day gecko and a few others) wouldn't require uva uvb as well, again, because they are most active at night.

So, I guess what I'm trying to say is, first figure out what animal you want, and that will determine yo9ur lighting, housing and other environmental needs
 

rileyrk190

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Oh, i'm sorry I just assumed that all reptiles needed the same light requirements. So basically what I told you then applies to iguanas, and other such lizards.
 

Rbacchiega

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yep, it's a common misconception really. Think of it this way, if they are sun bathers or mostly active during the day, then yes, they do need uva and uvb to properly process vitamin d and break down calcium etc, if they are active at night, then no. The best thing to do is research!
 

rileyrk190

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Now, I just want to know out of curiosity, but how do they absorb the calcium then? if you know of a link that explains it, that would be great too.
 

Rbacchiega

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snakes naturally absorb the calcium through the bones that are digested when it eats. Something in it's stomach breaks down to bones to a state where they can easily absorb it.... I'll try and find the books
 

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