Can I add fish to my tank?

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ampermal

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Hi,

Hoping someone can help me out as I'm a bit unsure of how to proceed with a newly filled tank which is yet to be stocked.

Tank is newly setup but was previously occupied by 3 gold fish, same external Eheim filter being used with their filter material in it, same gravel, which was rinsed thoroughly.  Heater introduced so tank can hold tropical fish.  Added stresszyme (store-bought beneficial bacteria) and a few flakes of food to "keep bacteria fed".

Question 1
Yesterday did a pH test which showed about 6.4.  The pet shop I want to buy my fish from says they have pH of about 7.0-7.2 which I was going to try and get my water to.  But today I read that if your water has pH of less than 7.0 that your fish waste will only be converted to ammonium (not harmful to fish) as opposed to ammonia.  So is it safe for me to add tropical fish now (a few at a time) by acclimating my new fish slowly before putting them into the tank?

Question 2
Also the pet shop fish attendant said I really should add 6-10 tetras to get the biological filter adjusted to an environment with a biological load because if doing the non-fish cycling method, when you add the fish you're going to end up with an increase in waste anyway and ammonia will result and be managed by water conditioners and water changes.  With only 6-10 tetras in a 50 gallon tank the ammonia spike will probably be minimal.

Question 3
Do I do a partial water change prior to adding the fish so that it's refreshed (tank would have been running for about 10 days with water conditioner, plants, few food flakes)

Question 4
When I want to add water to my tank during a water change, do I need to run "warm water" from the tap to get the same temp that will be running in the tank - about 26-28 degrees celsius.

I appreciate your time in reading this and hopefully clarifying these points for me.

Thanks 
 

genie

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Wow-- lots of questions. I reccommend not messing with your ph-- the fish will adjust, and it is better for the ph to be stable that exactly the same as the fish stores. Most people do a partial water change before adding new fish, and yes, you should try to get the temp to be the same if there are fish already in there-- If it will be a few hours before you add fish, then the temp isn't as crucial. I am not sure how many fish you should add since I don't see a tank size. I am using tetras to get my biological filter started. Yours should be well on its way if you kept the filter media wet between tanks and if it didnt take a long time. Maybe someone else can help you there.
 

aqua man130

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yeah its really a good idea to keep the ph the same cause they will get used to it but if have very sensitive fish then i would advise u to change it
 

starshine

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My water is also on the acidic side (ph is about 6.4-6.8), but all of my aqua pals have thrived in that environment...at the advice of my friends here on fishlore.com, I just let the fish acclimate rather than have the ph bouncing up and down all the time. And everyone is happy and healthy! I wasn't clear as to whether or not you kept the same filter media (bacteria and all) and how long it's been since the tank was dis-assembled and re-assembled. That would effect the length of your cycle. If you're going to cycle with fish, just keep an eye every day on the ammonia and do water changes as needed. A partial water change before adding your fish isn't a bad idea. As far as the temp. of the water goes, I just estimate the temp of the tank and tap by feel, and try to mke it as close as possible. One time I actually measured the temperature change after a 25% water change, and it only changed 2/10 of a degree. So I'm not too worried about "exact" temps. I don't know if my blurb helped any...I hope so! Good luck!
 

JMatt1983

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if you haven't already done so, get a liquid test kit, freshwater master test kit is the best by aquarium pharmaceuticals, i would go the fishless cycle, costs much less, and is less work, by cycling **** fish, you increase you cycle time by months, not to mention the daily 50% water changes to keep ammonia in check, my 10 gallon took 3 months to fully cycle with 2 fish in it, during that time i lost a red tail shark, and several platies, i went the fishless route with my 20 gallon, it cycled in 10 days, what your fish store guy told you is true, you will experience an ammonnia spike if you go fishless, but, the way to counter act that, and the proper way of adding fish takes care of it in no time, once your cycle is finished(ammonia=0,nitrite=0) you can start adding fish, 2-3 per week, doing it this way, allows the beneficial bacteria to adjust to the bioload. but really its your choice, you can take the much longer more expensive way, or the cheaper, shorter route, also, if you choose tocycle with fish, don't choose tetras, zebra danios are much hardier and much more likely to survive to survive the ammonia and nitrite poisoning.

ok, for pH, stable is best, less stress on the fish

before adding fish, test the water for ammonia, nitrite and nitrates, if everything checks out, do a partial water change to bring down the nitrates, then you can add fish, but only 2-3 per week until your tank is stocked

when you do water changes, just get the tap water as close as can to the temp in the tank, use a small thermometre if neccessary, and then add your water conditioner, if using a python gravel vac, add the conditioner to stream going into the tank
 
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ampermal

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I'll get the water testing underway to figure out where things are at and if/once ammonia/nitrites = 0 then I'll start stocking to avoid the longer cycling period caused by adding fish too soon. I'll leave the pH alone as advised and try to keep water change as close to tank temp as possible.

Thanks for all the advice, I really do appreciate it. Your replies helped a lot.
 
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