Can Bettas Do Okay In 3 Gallon Tanks?

J. Peefer
  • #1
So I'm going to college soon and was looking for a tank to get my betta. Because the dorms are small I wanted to get a smaller tank, I know 5 gallons are the preferred minimum but I was just wondering if a Betta would do okay in a 3 gallon? (planted, cycled, with heater and filter of course) Or is it essential to house them in 5 gallons? Also I've heard people mention the type of betta matters in this kind of situation, so if it helps I'm leaning towards getting a crowntail but I'm not sure yet.
 
~Matt~
  • #2
So I'm going to college soon and was looking for a tank to get my betta. Because the dorms are small I wanted to get a smaller tank, I know 5 gallons are the preferred minimum but I was just wondering if a Betta would do okay in a 3 gallon? (planted, cycled, with heater and filter of course) Or is it essential to house them in 5 gallons? Also I've heard people mention the type of betta matters in this kind of situation, so if it helps I'm leaning towards getting a crowntail but I'm not sure yet.

I guess they could live in a 3 gallon, but a 5-7 would be a much smarter option
 
goldface
  • #3
Yes, it's fine. Whether it's a Crowntail, Butterflytail , or Plakat doesn't matter.
 
JDK426
  • #4
Bettas are a very hardy fish. You can put them in 1 gallon and they will be fine as long as you do more frequent water changes. Betta like more shallow type water because they swim to the top for air. 2-3 gallon is very sufficient for a Betta contrary to what many may say. If you have the space I would never knock bigger , but many people who raise betta keep them in 1 gallon containers. Betta farms overseas keep them in water bottles with the tops cut off. Betta aren't very picky fish and will do just fine in your current set up. Remember there don't like heavy water flow. Not sure of your filter, but if you have a sponge filter its even better. Although again betta can live without filters and frequent water changes. I typically do 50% every other day in 1 gallons, and some in half gallons. Just treat the water with prime.
 
AtlasApollo98
  • #5
My half moon lived perfectly fine in my 3.5 gallon that was filtered, heated, and cycled. As long as you keep up with water changes and stuff it should be fine.
 
FishFor2018
  • #6
You can house a Betta in a 3 gallon tank but I’d say that’s the minimum. Bigger is always better though!
 
aussieJJDude
  • #7
For many, they reccomend a minimum to be around 2.5g. So in that case, a 3 gallon is more than enough.


I personally think if you can keep the betta, filter (and keep it cycled), heater, and decor suitable to the fish while still allowing some room to move about (say 6x the body lenght of the fish in at least one direction) than it should be more than enough to keep the betta well simulated.
 
smee82
  • #8
As said bigger is better but you'll be fine with 3g.
 
potter
  • #9
Fish will be fine if you keep up with the water changes. You can't slack on water changes.
 
BottomDweller
  • #10
In my opinion 3 gallons just doesn't provide enough space for a betta to be happy but if you do decide to do it, be sure to get a long tank rather than tall to give it a bit more swimming space.
 
sinned4g63
  • #11
I didn't have much luck keeping a Betta thriving in a 1.5 but I put a baby with damaged fins all around in a 2.5 and they are flourishing to this day. Bigger is certainly easier but as said above water changes will be crucial to maintain quality.
 
LagerthaM
  • #12
Hi! I am also a college student had the same problems with my tanks last year. I actually switched to these niffty travel type tanks from PetCo and they have been a life saver. I got one that holds about 5 gallons and it is shaped in a way that it doesn't take up too much space. I highly recommend them because they are also way easier to transport during breaks and move outs.
 

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