Can bettafix be used to treat a guppy with mild fin rot?

mygerbilprince

Member
It seems that my guppy has fin rot. At least I think its fin rot... none of the others have been picking on her and the shredded parts have a white outline. All my fish have been acting sluggish so I tried to lower my ammonia and they seem to be happier, accept for the "infected" fish. The others don't have any signs of fin rot. I have some left over bettafix so I was going to try it but not before I know it's safe.
 

Fishstery

Member
mygerbilprince said:
It seems that my guppy has fin rot. At least I think its fin rot... none of the others have been picking on her and the shredded parts have a white outline. All my fish have been acting sluggish so I tried to lower my ammonia and they seem to be happier, accept for the "infected" fish. The others don't have any signs of fin rot. I have some left over bettafix so I was going to try it but not before I know it's safe.
Bettafix IMO is useless. It's a good "proactive" measure, much like sanitizing an operating room before an operation, but not good as an actual treatment. You would only be slapping a band aid on it because you said that you "tried to lower your ammonia". You need to address the ammonia issue or you will never have healthy fish unfortunately.
 

Sofiafish17

Member
What is your ammonia at, and why do you need to lower it/why is it high?
 

StarGirl

Member
Do you have a photo?
 

Pfrozen

Member
If your ammonia is high you may want to read up on the Aquarium Nitrogen Cycle

Bettafix is tea tree oil, which is not a great thing to expose fish to. If you must use a "fix" product, use Pimafix- it is made from the West Indian bay tree, and is much milder. It gets a bad rap because of the other "fix" products, but there is nothing inherently wrong with Pimafix imo.

However, the best remedy is clean water and fresh tannins from botanicals such as the Indian Almond Leaf. No quick cure will ever match that.
 
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mygerbilprince

Member
1
Fishstery said:
Bettafix IMO is useless. It's a good "proactive" measure, much like sanitizing an operating room before an operation, but not good as an actual treatment. You would only be slapping a band aid on it because you said that you "tried to lower your ammonia". You need to address the ammonia issue or you will never have healthy fish unfortunately.
Well in one of my other threads, I talked about my ammonia always being too high. I'm starting to think my test is wrong because my fish so no signs of harm from the ammonia. So just know I have been trying. I added an ammonia neutralizer to try to solve the problem. I haven't tested my water since.
Pfrozen said:
If your ammonia is high you may want to read up on the Aquarium Nitrogen Cycle

Bettafix is tea tree oil, which is not a great thing to expose fish to. If you must use a "fix" product, use Pimafix- it is made from the West Indian bay tree, and is much milder. It gets a bad rap because of the other "fix" products, but there is nothing inherently wrong with Pimafix imo.

However, the best remedy is clean water and fresh tannins from botanicals such as the Indian Almond Leaf. No quick cure will ever match that.
So where can I get the "Indian Almond Leaf" If there are any other cures I'm willing to try them.
StarGirl said:
Do you have a photo?
I tried but my fish is too quick and her fins are almost see-through.
 

StarGirl

Member
I got some at the Local Fish store. You can order them on Amazon too. They are not cures. Just tannins to soothe them.
 

jtjgg

Member
do more frequent water changes.

clean water prevents many illnesses, and promotes healing.
 

Pfrozen

Member
Yup. there are no "cures" in this hobby unfortunately.

Number 1 would be cycling your tank. I would do a full water change, 90-100%, right away and then run a "fish-in" cycle. If you need to know how to do that we can help
 

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