Can aquarium salt effect hairgrass?

Lucy

Can aquarium salt defect hairgrass growing forever?
Hi
Can you elaborate? I'm not sure members know what you are asking.

Also, gonna move this to the plant section.
Good luck!
 

Mudminnow

I'm not sure if this is what you're asking, but the more salt you add, the worse it will be for the hairgrass. Full marine water will kill hairgrass, for example.
 

PeaP

I'm not sure if this is what you're asking, but the more salt you add, the worse it will be for the hairgrass. Full marine water will kill hairgrass, for example.
i took it out yesterday, but i am worried that it is ruined forever.
is that possible?
do I need to take it out and replace it with a new one?
 

RayClem

No plants other than some types of algae can grow in ocean wate due to the salt content.

There are a few plants like Mangrove trees that are adapted to tolerate the salt content of barckish swamps.

Most plants need fresh water with a low salt content. Some fish are not tolerant of salt, either. Scaleless fish such as corydoras and plecos do not like salt.

The problem with salt is that sodium in table salt/aquarium salt and potassium are both monovalent metalic ions. Potassium is one of the primary nutrients required by plants. As the sodium concentration increases, plants cells absorb sodium and are unable to acquire the potassium they need for proper growth.

If the salt damage to your plants is not fatal, they may recover over time by doing water changes without salt.

BTW: For those with salt exchange water softeners, the units operate by exchanging sodium ions for calcium and magnesium ions. If your water source is particularly hard, the sofetned water will be high in sodium content which is not good for fish, plants, or for drinking purposes. I do use my softened tap water for watering house plants, flowers and herbs, but I do not use it for fish or for drinking. The flowers and herbs do much better when they get natural rainfall which is low in sodium. You can recharge the softeners using potassium chloride rather than sodium chloried, but potassium chloride is several times more expensive.

In ancient times, conquering armies would often spread salt on the field of conquered foe so that nothing would grow. It might take centuries before the fields were again suitable for farming. Fortunately, salt was a precious commodity, so the practice was limited. Soldiers were often paid in salt. It is the word from which we get the word "salary" and the source of the expression "worth your salt".
 

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