Can angelfish go in a 20 gal long?

BettasAreSuperior
  • #1
Hi guys, can angelfish go in a 20 gallon long? Not going to get them just wondering. Thanks in advance!


SouthAmericanCichlids . bizaliz3
 
Unknown9182
  • #2
Hi guys, can angelfish go in a 20 gallon long? Not going to get them just wondering. Thanks in advance!


SouthAmericanCichlids .
Doubtful, but you could if it was a breeding tank. In theory you could put one angelfish in there and do some harlequin rasboras (4-5). But that would be stretching it.
 
BettasAreSuperior
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Doubtful, but you could if it was a breeding tank. In theory you could put one angelfish in there and do some harlequin rasboras (4-5). But that would be stretching it.
Angelfish like to be in pairs so, that would be a no-go. I agree, that would be stretching it.
 
AcornTheBetta
  • #4
Hi guys, can angelfish go in a 20 gallon long? Not going to get them just wondering. Thanks in advance!


SouthAmericanCichlids . bizaliz3
I would say no. Some says that you could do 1 angel in a 29, but I don't think it would work in a 20 especially a 20 long.
 
FishGirl115
  • #5
I would say no just based off all the NO!'s I got on putting angels in a 29...
 
BettasAreSuperior
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
I would say no just based off all the NO!'s I got on putting angels in a 29...
Ohhhh. Yeah, I am gonna forget it. Thx guys!
 
jake37
  • #7
No angelfishes like to be in schools but many people keep a single angle with success but that is besides the point.
---
You could grow out a young anglefish in a 20 long for a little while but depending on the size/age it would likely outgrow the tank within 3 months and would need to be moved to a deeper tank. Generally speaking I'm a firm believer that angles should be kept full time in a 55 or larger tank; but there are some who disagree and think a 29 is ample (imho a 29 is fine for breeding but not a perm. home). Also i know more than a few people who will keep 1 or a pair in 45 bowfront.
-


Angelfish like to be in pairs so, that would be a no-go. I agree, that would be stretching it.
 
FishGirl115
  • #8
Heh, well someone I know has two angels in a 10g. I can't get them to upsize or rehome unfortunately Poor fishes
 
BettasAreSuperior
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Heh, well someone I know has two angels in a 10g. I can't get them to upsize or rehome unfortunately Poor fishes
Ahhhh!!! Angels in a 10 gallon?! They could at least rehome?! Awww...poor angels.
 
Unknown9182
  • #10
Heh, well someone I know has two angels in a 10g. I can't get them to upsize or rehome unfortunately Poor fishes
Poor things, thats the equivalent of having an Oscar in a 5 gallon.
 
bobduhgeek
  • #11
For years, when I first started an aquarium 50+ years ago, I kept 5 angels and an assortment of other fish in a twenty gallon tank. It had a heater, an under gravel filter and a hob. I would change the water weekly. Feed daily. Never tested the water. They lasted for years. The end came about when lightening hit and wiped out the tank. I always had angels - but I did increase the size of the tanks. Years went by and so did many other aquariums and I learned much more about it all. My current is a 55gal standard. I keep it pristine. I had four angels and a breeding pair formed. This was the first time that had ever happened. I never want to see that again. Angels are evil when it comes to breeding. I am down to one angel in a tank of danios and endlers. He keeps the fry under control.
I suspect the water was so high in nitrates, in that first tank, that breeding was not an option. Draw your own conclusions.
 
BettasAreSuperior
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
For years, when I first started an aquarium 50+ years ago, I kept 5 angels and an assortment of other fish in a twenty gallon tank. It had a heater, an under gravel filter and a hob. I would change the water weekly. Feed daily. Never tested the water. They lasted for years. The end came about when lightening hit and wiped out the tank. I always had angels - but I did increase the size of the tanks. Years went by and so did many other aquariums and I learned much more about it all. My current is a 55gal standard. I keep it pristine. I had four angels and a breeding pair formed. This was the first time that had ever happened. I never want to see that again. Angels are evil when it comes to breeding. I am down to one angel in a tank of danios and endlers. He keeps the fry under control.
I suspect the water was so high in nitrates, in that first tank, that breeding was not an option. Draw your own conclusions.
I feel like the parameters will be fine but they would always fight since it wouldn't be enough room. Heavily planted and extra filtration would help, but IMO there would be not enough room.
 
RayClem
  • #13
When they are quite young angelfish could stay in a small aquarium. However, adult angelfish get to be the size of a saucer used for tea cups. A pair of adult angels would need something much larger than 20 gallons. When purchasing fish, it is best to consider the adult size rather than the juvenile size seen in your LFS.
 
jake37
  • #14
The first thing I would ask would be did the angels in the 20 long for years not become stunted? Because my adult angels would find it hard press to move vertical in such a tank. However, when raising angels if I keep them in a 20 too long they never seem to reach full adult size.... and no they don't grow larger when moved to a more roomy tank later. One might argue that perhaps this is a good thing - a way to produce mini angels - however from what i can tell such stunted angels have serious health issues. I.e., It might be good for the fish keeper but i doubt it is good for the fish.

For years, when I first started an aquarium 50+ years ago, I kept 5 angels and an assortment of other fish in a twenty gallon tank. It had a heater, an under gravel filter and a hob. I would change the water weekly. Feed daily. Never tested the water. They lasted for years. The end came about when lightening hit and wiped out the tank. I always had angels - but I did increase the size of the tanks. Years went by and so did many other aquariums and I learned much more about it all. My current is a 55gal standard. I keep it pristine. I had four angels and a breeding pair formed. This was the first time that had ever happened. I never want to see that again. Angels are evil when it comes to breeding. I am down to one angel in a tank of danios and endlers. He keeps the fry under control.
I suspect the water was so high in nitrates, in that first tank, that breeding was not an option. Draw your own conclusions.
 
bobduhgeek
  • #15
The first thing I would ask would be did the angels in the 20 long for years not become stunted? Because my adult angels would find it hard press to move vertical in such a tank. However, when raising angels if I keep them in a 20 too long they never seem to reach full adult size.... and no they don't grow larger when moved to a more roomy tank later. One might argue that perhaps this is a good thing - a way to produce mini angels - however from what i can tell such stunted angels have serious health issues. I.e., It might be good for the fish keeper but i doubt it is good for the fish.
They did not get as large as angels do - so yes, they were stunted. They didn't fight or bother the other inhabitants. I would put guppies in with them, they would eat the fry but not the adults. No fin nipping was observed. In my ignorance, I felt they were happy and well adjusted. Maybe they were, who knows for sure. The lack of breeding tells me the tank size and water parameters were wrong - but that is in hindsight. I had them for years. The experience was positive enough to instill a love of the hobby that persists today. I did take good care of the 20 gallon tank. The water changes were weekly, I siphoned the gravel, periodically I would rip out the entire tank to change/clean the undergravel filter. The hob filter media was changed/replaced frequently. All in all, it was a good tank.
 
SouthAmericanCichlids
  • #16
I would definitely say no. I would even stray from keeping them in a 29g, unless you have a pair (For a 29g). Angelfish are very social creatures, so they should either be kept as a pair or 4+ (Because aggression, being cichlids). So you could put a single pair with nothing else in a 29g. But in a 20 long, it is 12 in. high, angelfish can get 8-12+ inches tall, and if they get to 12 in. that is the whole height of the tank. And if they get to a smaller size, they will still be super cramped. & even in a 20 high, it is just to small and they would be too cramped. And while they don't have the biggest bioload, it would just be really heavy for a 20g. Just my opinion. For 1 socialness, 2 height, and 3 bioload.
 
BettasAreSuperior
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
I would definitely say no. I would even stray from keeping them in a 29g, unless you have a pair (For a 29g). Angelfish are very social creatures, so they should either be kept as a pair or 4+ (Because aggression, being cichlids). So you could put a single pair with nothing else in a 29g. But in a 20 long, it is 12 in. high, angelfish can get 8-12+ inches tall, and if they get to 12 in. that is the whole height of the tank. And if they get to a smaller size, they will still be super cramped. & even in a 20 high, it is just to small and they would be too cramped. And while they don't have the biggest bioload, it would just be really heavy for a 20g. Just my opinion. For 1 socialness, 2 height, and 3 bioload.
It was kinda up in the air but after this post SouthAmericanCichlids you convinced me not to, this was very informative thank you!
 
Dennis57
  • #18
NO!!!
 
Burdigala
  • #19
Angelfish like to be in pairs so, that would be a no-go. I agree, that would be stretching it.
Groups. They're a shoaling species. A pair may end up fighting.
 
RayClem
  • #20
You might be able to keep a couple of angelfish in a 20 gal long as juveniles, but since they are a taller than they are long, they would do better in a 20 gallon high. If you have space for a 20 gallon long, at least get a 29 gallon which has the same footprint as the 20 long but is several inches deeper. That would be far more suitable.

Angels will eventually get about 6" long and 8" high over their 8-12 year lifespan. That is far to big for even a 29 gallon. As full grown adults, they would need a 55 gallon tank or larger. So if you want angelfish plan on a much larger aquarium a year or two down the road.
 

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