Camallanus Worms: Fry, No Visible Signs

JoeCamaro

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Hello folks,
I had a female guppy that dropped fry on December 3rd, 2018. The mom had
camallanus worms. Mom was removed from the tank when she dropped them and they have been raised in it since birth.
I did not tale everything apart or did anything special other than regular water changes and vacuuming.

What are the chances the fry have the worms too? 100%?
How long does it usually take for the worms to be visible? They are over 2 months old and no signs yet.

Thank you.
 

CanadianJoeh

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Camallanus worms are a terrible parasite. There is only one cure. Depending on the size of the fry they may be fine. Check for sunken stomachs.

You'll have to treat the entire tank, though, as they are impossible to remove unless you do so. Treat the entire tank with Levamisole Hydrochloride. My fish survived and recovered nicely. LINK : PlecoPlanet
 
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JoeCamaro

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Camallanus worms are a terrible parasite. There is only one cure. Depending on the size of the fry they may be fine. Check for sunken stomachs.

You'll have to treat the entire tank, though, as they are impossible to remove unless you do so. Treat the entire tank with Levamisole Hydrochloride. My fish survived and recovered nicely. LINK : PlecoPlanet
Thank you very much for your input.

The fish look good. Their bellies look round and I haven't seen any worms protruding out of their anuses or anything like that. I just have kept them in that tank waiting to see if they showed any symptoms, afraid to move them to other tanks and spread the worms if they have them.

At 2 months and a half old, should there be signs already? Or are these worms able to remain hidden for long periods of time and then suddenly show?

Thanks.
 

nedpatrick

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I’d treat anyway I’d bet that they have worms just not enough for them to protrude. Typically when they’re protruding the fish is already filled with them and it’s much harder to get rid of them so it’s very possible that the fry have worms and they just don’t have enough for them to protrude.
 
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JoeCamaro

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I’d treat anyway I’d bet that they have worms just not enough for them to protrude. Typically when they’re protruding the fish is already filled with them and it’s much harder to get rid of them so it’s very possible that the fry have worms and they just don’t have enough for them to protrude.
That makes sense. Thank you for the info.
 

CanadianJoeh

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They do not disapear on their own. Typically when you see the worms protruding, it is already in the later stages.
 

Repolie

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The fry could still have worms. Since the mother had them protruding, it means that the worms were in their reproductive phase and may have already released larvae into the tank where the fry could've eaten the free swimming larvae.
 
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JoeCamaro

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They do not disapear on their own. Typically when you see the worms protruding, it is already in the later stages.
The fry could still have worms. Since the mother had them protruding, it means that the worms were in their reproductive phase and may have already released larvae into the tank where the fry could've eaten the free swimming larvae.
Thank you very much. I am trying to consolidate some tanks, put juvie platies with these guppies, but wanted to make sure before I did. I will treat the tank and go from there. I appreciate all the help and valuable info.
 

coralbandit

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If you have multiple tanks you really need to treat all of them.
^^ I agree ^^
Treatment is simple so just do all tanks and then again 3 weeks from now .
That is all there is to it anyways ..It's a shame so many let it get so bad the treatment is such a big issue.
A healthy fish should surely survive any treatment applied properly.
You dose 1 time and change water 3 days later ,go on with life and treat again in 3 weeks to get any eggs the levamisole HCI did not kill the first time.
 
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JoeCamaro

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If you have multiple tanks you really need to treat all of them.
^^ I agree ^^
Treatment is simple so just do all tanks and then again 3 weeks from now .
That is all there is to it anyways ..It's a shame so many let it get so bad the treatment is such a big issue.
A healthy fish should surely survive any treatment applied properly.
You dose 1 time and change water 3 days later ,go on with life and treat again in 3 weeks to get any eggs the levamisole HCI did not kill the first time.
Thank you very much. Although I haven't move any fish from the affected tank to any of the other tanks, I will do that as I use the same siphon and buckets for all the tanks.

I appreciate the suggestions.
 
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