calling all biologists - cycling with enzymes

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hcroark

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I make my own enzyme cleaner. My own version of Biokleen or Nature's Miracle without the alcohol. The only ingredients I use is citrus fruit, brown sugar, and water. It sits for about 3 months to give the live enzymes (good bacteria?) time to grow. It's supposed to be good for pet odors and urine as the bacteria literally eat it the nasty. But it's very safe. Would this by any chance be the same type of bacteria that my tank needs to cycle? That would be awesome if I could get a super quick cycle with this stuff.
 

jwhorner6

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Chemist, not a biologist so i'm not sure my answer will satisfy you 100%. You state you let it sit for 3 months to give the live enzymes time to grow. Enzymes are not living like bacteria are. They are actually large protein molecules made up of amino acides.

That being said I don't see where your solution contains anything that would resemble a freshwater aquarium and would stimulate growth of nitrifying bacteria that would work in an aquarium.

But as you state...a biologist will know much more about that whole process and might be able to prove me wrong so I would wait for other responses.
 

matsungit

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Tetra Pond Sludge Reducer has both enzymes and beneficial bacteria. It works as I have tried it. The enzymes probably bonds to organic waste and the bacteria the product comes with does the work of breaking them down. I'm not sure if it has anything to do with cycling. Most likely it's a different strain. But I think it may reduce the amount of waste that should've been turned into ammonia.
 

Thermonectus

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jwhorner6 said:
Enzymes are not living like bacteria are. They are actually large protein molecules made up of amino acides.
Microbiologist here! This is correct, although matsungit also has a point - enzymes can help break down certain compounds to make them more readily available for bacteria to use.

If your "live cleaner" does scrub away pet odors and the like, than it probably contains some kind of ammonia-digesting compounds. Whether or not this property comes from bacteria or some inorganic reaction with the cleaner is tough to say.

Aquariums use (essentially) 2 main kinds of bacteria in the nitrogen cycle. One kind, Nitrosomonas, turns ammonium into nitrites. The second, Nitrospira, takes those nitrites and turns them to nitrates. Unless your cleaner has both of these types present already, I wouldn't expect it to help the cycle. Remember, cycling involves establishing bacterial cultures, not just getting rid of ammonium! Sounds interesting, though!
 

oysterstu

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[I said:
The second, Nitrospira, takes those nitrites and turns them to nitrates
is this the same as Nitrobacter? or is nitrospira more commonly used now?
 

matsungit

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