Brown Suckerfish

Coptapia

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It's a Sturisoma, closely related to the Whiptails and often called Royal Whiptails.
 

chromedome52

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Nose is not pointed enough for any species of Sturisoma, nor is the dorsal pointed enough, and there should be filaments on more of the fins. It is a species of Whiptail, but there are a lot of them. The average aquarist is not going to be able to identify the exact species without help, I'd check out PlanetCatfish.

Largest genus of Whiptails I think is Rhineloricaria.
 

chromedome52

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I passed over the Red Lizard because PlanetCatfish photos of L10a don't have a filament on the top edge of the caudal, but I did a google image search and several of the photos there did show them with a filament just like OP's fish. I think you are right @Piaelliott , and that makes sense, as this is a frequently sold species because it can be (relatively easily) aquarium bred.

It should be noted that this is an omnivore, and should be offered meaty foods in addition to veggies.
 

Piaelliott

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chromedome52 said:
I passed over the Red Lizard because PlanetCatfish photos of L10a don't have a filament on the top edge of the caudal, but I did a google image search and several of the photos there did show them with a filament just like OP's fish. I think you are right @Piaelliott , and that makes sense, as this is a frequently sold species because it can be (relatively easily) aquarium bred.

It should be noted that this is an omnivore, and should be offered meaty foods in addition to veggies.
chromedome52 said:
I passed over the Red Lizard because PlanetCatfish photos of L10a don't have a filament on the top edge of the caudal, but I did a google image search and several of the photos there did show them with a filament just like OP's fish. I think you are right @Piaelliott , and that makes sense, as this is a frequently sold species because it can be (relatively easily) aquarium bred.

It should be noted that this is an omnivore, and should be offered meaty foods in addition to veggies.
Now I got curious and looked at planet catfish. The first fish's caudal fin doesn't have the filament but then the tail looks pretty beat up. Some others have the filament, especially when you look at the pic of the gravid female.
I did a lot of research when I got mine and the can all look a bit different, an even red, with blotches, and even peachy.
A lovely fish, mine enjoyed bloodworms.
 
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