Question Breeding For Profit Tank

BettaFishKeeper4302

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So i have this 20 gallon long, i've decided its going to be a breeding for profit tank for a while. I am going to over filter, live plants. I was planning on doing guppies but what else could i do with them?
 

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Longfin super red bn plecos
Wild bettas (super dense planting needed)
Mystery snails
Plants
MTS
A lot of people underestimate plants and snails, but those are the things you should focus on since no one thinks to breed them. Even pest snails, as lots of people need feeders. And I've been making some nice money with my red root floaters.
 

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Longfin super red bn plecos
Wild bettas (super dense planting needed)
Mystery snails
Plants
MTS
A lot of people underestimate plants and snails, but those are the things you should focus on since no one thinks to breed them. Even pest snails, as lots of people need feeders. And I've been making some nice money with my red root floaters.
Wild Bettas usually aren't the best choice for those who haven't bred for too long; they are different to work with than the typical domesticated better we're used to. And anywho, betta breeding will usually require a lot more equipment later on (ie: additional holding tanks for individuals or groups as they mature) which may not be feasible for everyone.

If you aren't really focused on a particular strain, you can always layer the breeding in the tank. For example, focus on something similar to livebearers, such as endlers (keeping the line purities in mind), and grow popular, but easy, plants at the same time. You could also breed things like mystery snails and/or medium-high quality shrimp, provided you have enough plant cover. With enough experimentation, you'll have a multi-layer breeding tank that won't take up too much of your time and can make some side cash
 

Rtessy

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Wild Bettas usually aren't the best choice for those who haven't bred for too long; they are different to work with than the typical domesticated better we're used to. And anywho, betta breeding will usually require a lot more equipment later on (ie: additional holding tanks for individuals or groups as they mature) which may not be feasible for everyone.

If you aren't really focused on a particular strain, you can always layer the breeding in the tank. For example, focus on something similar to livebearers, such as endlers (keeping the line purities in mind), and grow popular, but easy, plants at the same time. You could also breed things like mystery snails and/or medium-high quality shrimp, provided you have enough plant cover. With enough experimentation, you'll have a multi-layer breeding tank that won't take up too much of your time and can make some side cash
Lol, wilds are the first thing I've bred, other than snails...
But yeah, if this is your first time breeding, wild bettas probably aren't the best choice. I've just gotten a pretty good amount of experience with really sensitive soft water species, so it wasn't a big jump for me.
 
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BettaFishKeeper4302

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I wouldn’t go guppies. I would go rare endlers live bearer species. You won’t make any serious money breeding guppies the market is too over saturated. You can also do rare neocardinal shrimp if you do endlers, they reproduce like crazy.
I've thought about neocardinal shrimp, what rare ender would you suggest?

Are bn plecos messy? I thought about breeding them in the tank as well but thought they'd be too messy.
 

Rtessy

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I've heard they're pretty messy. If you go with endlers, be sure to get some certified N class ones, those can go for more. There are several N class variants, personally I like the blue star variety.
 
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BettaFishKeeper4302

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I've heard they're pretty messy. If you go with endlers, be sure to get some certified N class ones, those can go for more. There are several N class variants, personally I like the blue star variety.
Don't know much about endlers, so i gotga go study now.
 

Rtessy

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What's so special about N class ones? How do i know which are rare or not?
N class are pure endlers, which are getting increasingly rare since people hybridize them with guppies to get more colors. As for rarity, N class are going to be the most rare, but check what others are selling for, not what they're listed for, on websites like aquabid
 

Culprit

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if you really want to make some dough set up a high grade Caridina tank (CRS), and a high grde type of neocaridinia such as blue dreams. Grow easy, popular plants at the same time. Breeding CRS you can make bannkkk.
 
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BettaFishKeeper4302

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if you really want to make some dough set up a high grade Caridina tank (CRS), and a high grde type of neocaridinia such as blue dreams. Grow easy, popular plants at the same time. Breeding CRS you can make bannkkk.
CRS as in cherry red shrimp? And what would be a high grade neocaridnia shrimp?
 

Rtessy

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CRS as in cherry red shrimp? And what would be a high grade neocaridnia shrimp?
Crystal red shrimp. Cherry shrimp are abbreviated RCS, really confusing, lol. Crystal reds are a type of caridina shrimp and a lot more sensitive. You'd need RO water and some kind if remineralizer, I like Salty Shrimp gH+
A good high grade neo would be bloody Marys
 

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CRS as in cherry red shrimp? And what would be a high grade neocaridnia shrimp?
No, CRS as in Crystal Red Shrimp. Neocaridina are the Red Cherry Shrimp you're thinking of, and different color strains can sell for quite a bit. They're more touchy than the classic reds though, and Caridina are more sensitive than neocaridina.
 

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If you haven't already, a good series to watch is Cory's "Breeding for Profit" videos:

He's long winded, but the point he makes is that it's about a few different factors--
1) Establishing a relationship with your customer. If you have a lfs you want to sell to, it's probably a good first step to go in and ask THEM what they're looking for. I breed endlers, and some weeks my lfs (which happens to be Aquarium Co-Op ) wants them, and sometimes they don't. They never want the rare wild-type graded varieties--they don't have the space. They do want the more eye-catching hybrid types. But I breed them because endlers don't really give me a choice--either I breed them or I get rid of all of them As long as I have a single female, I'm going to have fry.
2) Don't be afraid to breed common! Fish stores sell a LOT more fancy guppies than they do a $30 pleco variety.
3) Plants are probably better in terms of $/square inch in a single 20 long than fish. LFS's ALWAYS want java moss, and stem plants are also big sellers.

There are a couple of other really good videos out there about how easy it is to get in over your head-- Lucky Smuck's Tilapia video:

and Joey's "How I made $20K in a month" video:

Breeding fish can be the easy part. Selling them is the pain. And them outbreeding the space you have for them is WAY too easy...
 
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BettaFishKeeper4302

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If you haven't already, a good series to watch is Cory's "Breeding for Profit" videos:

He's long winded, but the point he makes is that it's about a few different factors--
1) Establishing a relationship with your customer. If you have a lfs you want to sell to, it's probably a good first step to go in and ask THEM what they're looking for. I breed endlers, and some weeks my lfs (which happens to be Aquarium Co-Op ) wants them, and sometimes they don't. They never want the rare wild-type graded varieties--they don't have the space. They do want the more eye-catching hybrid types. But I breed them because endlers don't really give me a choice--either I breed them or I get rid of all of them As long as I have a single female, I'm going to have fry.
2) Don't be afraid to breed common! Fish stores sell a LOT more fancy guppies than they do a $30 pleco variety.
3) Plants are probably better in terms of $/square inch in a single 20 long than fish. LFS's ALWAYS want java moss, and stem plants are also big sellers.

There are a couple of other really good videos out there about how easy it is to get in over your head-- Lucky Smuck's Tilapia video:

and Joey's "How I made $20K in a month" video:

Breeding fish can be the easy part. Selling them is the pain. And them outbreeding the space you have for them is WAY too easy...
Thank you, i happen to watch them both, i'll watch these videos later. Still a little bit funky on rare types of neocaridina shrimp but i 'll understand it soon. Btw you are really lucky to have aquarium coop as your lfs. Do you ever see cory there?
 
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