Breeding Fish

SouthAmericanCichlids
Member
So I am starting a couple of bins in my mom's greenhouse and these are the fish I am thinking about breeding: Albino BN plecos, an Appisto species (Not sure yet which species), salt and pepper cories, and a species of shell dwellers. I don't think I'll start them all at the same time because of funds, but which one would you advise me to start with to get the rest of the funds? I am kind of worried about the BN, as they take a while to get their bristles, I already have one I've decided to be a male, but I need to find a female.

Btw: Not doing this just to make money, I really love trying to breed fish, seeing the babies, and behaviours, and these are fish I already want to have (Besides BN which I already have).
 
Broggy
Member
I would start with the Corys. easy to breed, and grow pretty fast.
 
Cherryshrimp420
Member
I think the cories need soft, acidic water
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids
Member
I have extremely hard water, would it not be possible for me to breed cories. I've bred angelfish, which also come from the amazon.
 
Donovan Jones
Member
SouthAmericanCichlids said:
I have extremely hard water, would it not be possible for me to breed cories. I've bred angelfish, which also come from the amazon.
I have liquid rock. C. Paleatus bred after every water change for me. Just ensure u have male and female. I recommend breeding in one tank and removing eggs then putting them outside to bulk up since the parents will dispatch babies and eggs with ease
 
Broggy
Member
SouthAmericanCichlids said:
I have extremely hard water, would it not be possible for me to breed cories. I've bred angelfish, which also come from the amazon.
im guessing these ponds are going to be planted? maybe you could have it fully planted and cycled before you put the cories in it and let the water naturally get softer. would that work?
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids
Member
Well, I will cycle them first. But my water has never naturally gotten softer it's always been 8.2-8.4 depending on time of day.
Donovan Jones said:
I have liquid rock. C. Paleatus bred after every water change for me. Just ensure u have male and female. I recommend breeding in one tank and removing eggs then putting them outside to bulk up since the parents will dispatch babies and eggs with ease
Thanks, I'll try those.
 
Cherryshrimp420
Member
I just know most cory breeders here use acidic soft water. If they can breed in hard water than that's cool and let us know how it goes!
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids
Member
Donovan Jones said:
I have liquid rock. C. Paleatus bred after every water change for me. Just ensure u have male and female. I recommend breeding in one tank and removing eggs then putting them outside to bulk up since the parents will dispatch babies and eggs with ease
Do you know what types can be bred in hard water.
Cherryshrimp420 said:
I just know most cory breeders here use acidic soft water. If they can breed in hard water than that's cool and let us know how it goes!
I will! I'll probably do a build thread, so I'll link it hear.
 
Donovan Jones
Member
That would be a good question for Coradee ee and DoubleDutch for which can be bred in hard water. How hard is it specifically?
 
Nessaf
Member
If you have hidey holes for your plecos, it’s almost impossible to keep them from breeding.
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids
Member
8.2-8.4 depending on time of day, it's funny it fluctuates depending on what time it is.
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids
Member
Bump. Coradee any ideas of cories you can breed in hard water?
 
Donovan Jones
Member
It seems as though the forum removed the links or it bugged out.
Coradee DoubleDutch
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids
Member
Donovan Jones said:
It seems as though the forum removed the links or it bugged out.
Coradee DoubleDutch
It does after a little bit of time, but they still get the notification.
 
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Coradee
Moderator
Member
Sorry, only just seen this.
Most of the easily sourced corys such as aenus, paleatus etc are tank bred so are more adaptable to harder water. You may not get such a high hatch rate as in soft water but as those species are quite prolific that might be a good thing, good luck keep us posted :)
 
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