Breeding Bettas

natev

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:) Hello! I just recently joined this forum and I’m looking for details on breeding bettas? I have a female betta with spoonhead and a male betta with a “regular head” the breeder told me that breeding the both of them should result in regular headed bettas and upon more research it seems that a lot of betta breeders breed the two so they compliment each other. Opinions? I don’t want to end up with a bunch of bettas who I can’t give homes, I’m relatively new at breeding but I’ve successfully nurtured three groups of newly hatched bettas without much complication.
 

Demeter

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Can you post photos of the bettas? Generally speaking you want to avoid breeding bettas that have undesirable trades (spoon head, bend spines, poor fin shape, etc). It is better to pick fish that already have good form and fins rather than taking lesser strains and trying to get something great. If you are breeding a fish with a bad spoon head then you should expect several fry with some degree of spoon head.

That being said, if the trait isn't too bad and the other half of the pair has much better traits then you can breed them, but you may have to cull more fry that have noticeable bad traits than you would if you were breeding a better pair. I see culling as a necessary evil so if you don't mind killing young fish with poor genetics then it may not be a problem for you. I feed my culls to either cichlids or my axolotl so nothing goes to waste.
 

jdhef

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Welcome to FishLore! I hope you enjoy the site.
 

Jackiesdaddy

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Can you post photos of the bettas? Generally speaking you want to avoid breeding bettas that have undesirable trades (spoon head, bend spines, poor fin shape, etc). It is better to pick fish that already have good form and fins rather than taking lesser strains and trying to get something great. If you are breeding a fish with a bad spoon head then you should expect several fry with some degree of spoon head.

That being said, if the trait isn't too bad and the other half of the pair has much better traits then you can breed them, but you may have to cull more fry that have noticeable bad traits than you would if you were breeding a better pair. I see culling as a necessary evil so if you don't mind killing young fish with poor genetics then it may not be a problem for you. I feed my culls to either cichlids or my axolotl so nothing goes to waste.
I'm also new, and interested in breeding. I had a friend recently gift me a beautiful male, I believe he is a dumbo halfmoon, named him Pennywise because of his colors. I'm including photo, I want to get my daughter involved and try our hand at shows. What do you think of my pennywise, and I'm thinking of getting a rosetail female if I can find one. I like the really wispy flowing fins
 

FinalFins

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Betta breeding isn't for beginners. Multiple (around one hundred)tanks, filtered and heated, live foods not to mention conditioning and water changes every day for each tank.
 

Jackiesdaddy

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Betta breeding isn't for beginners. Multiple (around one hundred)tanks, filtered and heated, live foods not to mention conditioning and water changes every day for each tank.
I realize this, I have no qualms taking this chore on in full simply because I want the experience. I'm not looking for profit and honestly expect it to be more of a money pit lol. I'm trying to get my daughter (10) into it as a way of creating quality time between us and hopefully being able to show what we come up with. She is saying she wants to be a marine biologist or scientist and I see this as a healthy form of encouragement. But I also want us to eventually, at least once participate in a show which is why I wondered what your thoughts were on our first male and what to breed him with since I do not have a sibling to cross him with
 

Jackiesdaddy

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I realize this, I have no qualms taking this chore on in full simply because I want the experience. I'm not looking for profit and honestly expect it to be more of a money pit lol. I'm trying to get my daughter (10) into it as a way of creating quality time between us and hopefully being able to show what we come up with. She is saying she wants to be a marine biologist or scientist and I see this as a healthy form of encouragement. But I also want us to eventually, at least once participate in a show which is why I wondered what your thoughts were on our first male and what to breed him with since I do not have a sibling to cross him with
 

Demeter

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I'm also new, and interested in breeding. I had a friend recently gift me a beautiful male, I believe he is a dumbo halfmoon, named him Pennywise because of his colors. I'm including photo, I want to get my daughter involved and try our hand at shows. What do you think of my pennywise, and I'm thinking of getting a rosetail female if I can find one. I like the really wispy flowing finsView attachment 627016View attachment 627017
I wouldn't consider your male of show quality. While he is cute he has weak rays as seen in the dorsal and tail fins (how they bend over at the top). He doesn't appear to be a HM either as his spread isn't quite 180 degrees. He does have nice pectoral fins but I'm not one for long finned bettas, especially those like rose tails that often have issues swimming due to the heavy fins and are more prone to finrot and tail biting.

If you do want to breed him then go for a dumbo HMPK female. You will likely get mostly long fins as that is a dominant gene but a good HMPK will hopefully strengthen the rays and making the young more robust. Just make sure you do your research and invest in all the live food cultures and spare tanks/jars the individual males will need. He looks quite young yet so hold off on breeding him for at least a couple more months.
 

Jackiesdaddy

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I wouldn't consider your male of show quality. While he is cute he has weak rays as seen in the dorsal and tail fins (how they bend over at the top). He doesn't appear to be a HM either as his spread isn't quite 180 degrees. He does have nice pectoral fins but I'm not one for long finned bettas, especially those like rose tails that often have issues swimming due to the heavy fins and are more prone to finrot and tail biting.

If you do want to breed him then go for a dumbo HMPK female. You will likely get mostly long fins as that is a dominant gene but a good HMPK will hopefully strengthen the rays and making the young more robust. Just make sure you do your research and invest in all the live food cultures and spare tanks/jars the individual males will need. He looks quite young yet so hold off on breeding him for at least a couple more months.
Ty and that shouldn't be a problem lol, I want to be sure I have everything needed on hand before I even attempt it and that's going to take me a few months at least to get ready
 

Truckjohn

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I would definitely look for good looking healthy fish to breed.

The thing is - some of these weird "problems" are caused by poor nutrition of the mothers and frys... And some of the weird problems are caused by too much inbreeding.

The general rule of animal husbandry is that it takes 4 generations doing everything right with zero inbreeding and very good nutrition/hygiene to clean up the mess and undo the harmful effects of this.

Unfortunately - breeders LOVE inbreeding.. It has ruined wonderful dog breeds like German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Daschunds, and Labs.. It's destroying betta fish.
 
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