Bought Filter 2 Weeks Ago And Cloudy Water?

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
I’ve had this tank for 2 months now and just got a filter 2 weeks ago. Ever since I put it in it started to be cloudy, it somewhat cleared up but still very cloudy. I put cycled media from my established tank and feed it fish food or pure ammonia every day since their aren’t any fish in it besides some snails. Any help?
IMG_1430.JPG
IMG_1397.JPG
the clearer picture is without the filter.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
kallililly1973 said:
Could be a bacteria bloom from it getting the cycle going with your established media and Ammonia.
Any suggestions on fixing it? Or is it ok? If so how long will it take to clear up completely, my plants have gotten dirtier too.
 

kallililly1973

Fishlore Legend
Member
Messages
10,430
Reactions
10,400
Location
Rhode Island USA
Experience
3 years
I would ride it out a bit and as far as the plants getting dirty are they showing brown that wipes away easily? Those are usually diatoms which pretty much always show up in new tanks. You can just brush them away and siphon them up when you do your WC's. Keep testing your parameters and feeding the beneficial bacteria. Till your readings show zero nitrites and ammonia and traces (5-20) nitrates. And once your able to dose 2ppm of ammonia and test the next day and its back to zero you will be ready to stock.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
kallililly1973 said:
I would ride it out a bit and as far as the plants getting dirty are they showing brown that wipes away easily? Those are usually diatoms which pretty much always show up in new tanks. You can just brush them away and siphon them up when you do your WC's. Keep testing your parameters and feeding the beneficial bacteria. Till your readings show zero nitrites and ammonia and traces (5-20) nitrates. And once your able to dose 2ppm of ammonia and test the next day and its back to zero you will be ready to stock.
How long will this process take? Since it’s been like this for over 2 weeks.
 

RSababady

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,312
Reactions
733
Location
Warsaw, Poland
Experience
More than 10 years
TimothyHartwick said:
How long will this process take? Since it’s been like this for over 2 weeks.
It varies...... you can also try to squeeze some of the dirt from existing media in your other tank to get some BB in the new filter - again.
Are you testing your water? What are the parameters for ammonia, nitrites, nitrates, pH?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
kallililly1973 said:
A completed tank cycle can take anywhere between 4-8 weeks. Do you know your current water parameter readings. Ammonia Nitrites Nitrates and PH
Nitrate: around 100 (using tetra 6 in 1 so don’t know if it’s accurate)
Nitrite: 0.5 (using tetra 6 in 1)
Ammonia: around 0.15 (ammonia apI kit)
Ph: 5.99 give or take a few
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
kallililly1973 said:
A completed tank cycle can take anywhere between 4-8 weeks. Do you know your current water parameter readings. Ammonia Nitrites Nitrates and PH
It has gotten worse
IMG_1441.JPG
please help
 

abbytherookiehuman

Active Member
Member
Messages
376
Reactions
86
Location
Sydney
Experience
2 years
Maybe add a snail and do a 30% water change and have the lights on for shorter periods. Also find out if you can take a sample to your lfs to test for total dissolved solids (tds). Also make sure there is enough water circulation.
Give your tank time to cycle. Some times to re cycles and it takes longer
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
kallililly1973 said:
What are your current water parameters? Are you running filter floss in your filter to pick up fine particles?
Ammonia: close to 0 ppm
Nitrite: 0.4 ppm
Nitrate: 100 ppm
Chlorine: 0 ppm
Ph: 6.36
And yes I’m running a filter floss and I change it every week. The nitrate might not be accurate since I’m using tetra 6 in 1 strips.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
abbytherookiehuman said:
Maybe add a snail and do a 30% water change and have the lights on for shorter periods. Also find out if you can take a sample to your lfs to test for total dissolved solids (tds). Also make sure there is enough water circulation.
Give your tank time to cycle. Some times to re cycles and it takes longer
I have some pest snails, and how many hours should the lights be on for? Right now it’s from 10 am to 7pm on the manual timers, so 9 hours. Also since feeding flakes and pure ammonia I’ve noticed the reddish coloured worms in my tank more. Like around 3 to 4 of them all about 3 cm. any help?
IMG_1376.JPG
that’s an old picture but it looks like that, it can stretch its body a lot.
 

mattgirl

Fishlore Legend
Member
Messages
13,626
Reactions
13,516
Location
Closer to Heaven every day but for now-Arkansas
Experience
More than 10 years
Your nitrates are too high and your PH is too low to successfully cycle this tank.

What is the PH of your source water? If it is higher than what you are seeing in this tank water changes should get the tanks PH up close to the same as your source water.

If you are adding pure liquid ammonia there is no reason to also be adding fish food. All it is doing is adding a lot of unnecessary waste to a cycling tank and could be adding to the clouding issue.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
mattgirl said:
Your nitrates are too high and your PH is too low to successfully cycle this tank.

What is the PH of your source water? If it is higher than what you are seeing in this tank water changes should get the tanks PH up close to the same as your source water.

If you are adding pure liquid ammonia there is no reason to also be adding fish food. All it is doing is adding a lot of unnecessary waste to a cycling tank and could be adding to the clouding issue.
Ph of RO water is 7.01, should I decrease the amount of liquid ammonia? I change it up like 2-3 days of flakes and a couple of days of liquid ammonia since I’m running low on ammonia and it’s a 3 hour drive to get some more. And should I do a water change every day until the nitrates are lower and the Ph is higher? And I think I’m close to a cycled tank correct?
 

mattgirl

Fishlore Legend
Member
Messages
13,626
Reactions
13,516
Location
Closer to Heaven every day but for now-Arkansas
Experience
More than 10 years
If I am understanding correctly you have had this tank running for 2 months without a filter. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I am assuming that you have another tank that is fully cycled. You moved some seeded media from a cycled tank to this tank when you put a filter on this tank. If the media came from a cycle and well stocked tank you should have gotten an almost instant cycle in this tank. The thing about the low PH is it turns your ammonia into ammonium. The bacteria can still process the ammonium but not very well or very fast.

You may find that your cycle is complete if you will get the nitrates down and the PH up with water changes.

Is there a specific reason you are using RO water? If the PH is higher in your tap water is it possible to use it for your water change to get the PH up above 7?

You don't need to be adding ammonia every day at this point and the amount of ammonia you need to add depends on what you plan on stocking this tank with. 1ppm every other day may be enough.

I can't say for certain how long it will take to complete the cycle but if you added seeded media it is very possible that you have already finished cycling. Now it is just a matter of getting the numbers balanced out.

The high nitrates and Low PH need to be taken care of. Get the nitrates down to close to 20 and the PH above 7 and I think you will be well on your way to a fully cycled tank.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #19
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
mattgirl said:
If I am understanding correctly you have had this tank running for 2 months without a filter. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I am assuming that you have another tank that is fully cycled. You moved some seeded media from a cycled tank to this tank when you put a filter on this tank. If the media came from a cycle and well stocked tank you should have gotten an almost instant cycle in this tank. The thing about the low PH is it turns your ammonia into ammonium. The bacteria can still process the ammonium but not very well or very fast.

You may find that your cycle is complete if you will get the nitrates down and the PH up with water changes.

Is there a specific reason you are using RO water? If the PH is higher in your tap water is it possible to use it for your water change to get the PH up above 7?

You don't need to be adding ammonia every day at this point and the amount of ammonia you need to add depends on what you plan on stocking this tank with. 1ppm every other day may be enough.

I can't say for certain how long it will take to complete the cycle but if you added seeded media it is very possible that you have already finished cycling. Now it is just a matter of getting the numbers balanced out.

The high nitrates and Low PH need to be taken care of. Get the nitrates down to close to 20 and the PH above 7 and I think you will be well on your way to a fully cycled tank.
I've had this tank for 9 weeks, 6 of them were without a filter and the rest has been with a small filter (enough for a 5 gal).

I got the media from my well stocked 75 gallon since the filter didn't have any media in it ( I also had to add filter floss).

My cycled media are ceramic rings but I've heard they aren't good for lowering nitrates. Any idea on how to lower it? If it's safe I'll do a 30-40% water change everyday until its lowered. Just need confirmation that it's safe to do.

My tap water has a lot of chlorine in it and other metals and really dirty. People say RO water also helps with algae (ironically I have a significant amount).

Might stock it with a betta (not really sure yet).

So if I get the numbers to an acceptable amount will the cloudiness go away? I'm still not fully sure why it's cloudy? From what I've heard it's a lot of BB clumping up, please correct me if I'm wrong.
 

mattgirl

Fishlore Legend
Member
Messages
13,626
Reactions
13,516
Location
Closer to Heaven every day but for now-Arkansas
Experience
More than 10 years
TimothyHartwick said:
I've had this tank for 9 weeks, 6 of them were without a filter and the rest has been with a small filter (enough for a 5 gal).

I got the media from my well stocked 75 gallon since the filter didn't have any media in it ( I also had to add filter floss).

My cycled media are ceramic rings but I've heard they aren't good for lowering nitrates. Any idea on how to lower it? If it's safe I'll do a 30-40% water change everyday until its lowered. Just need confirmation that it's safe to do.
There are certain ways to set up your tank to grow a bacteria that will help remove nitrates but I have never done it so can't give advice on what you need to do to grow it. Just ceramic rings or any media for that matter won't just automatically grow that bacteria. Do a search here on the forum or you may want to start another thread about it and those that know may be able to help you.

Since this is a fishless tank doing a 100% water change would not cause a problem. I am not saying you need to change that much. I just wanted to let you know you can change enough to get your nitrates down and your PH up.

My tap water has a lot of chlorine in it and other metals and really dirty. People say RO water also helps with algae (ironically I have a significant amount).
It seems your experience with algae is proving that RO water doesn't prevent it. Chlorine in your tap water isn't a problem as long as you use a water conditioner to remove it. Most water conditioners claI'm to remove heavy metals too. I don't understand why you have dirty water coming from your tap but only you can know that and what is causing it.

Might stock it with a betta (not really sure yet).
I read back through this thread and unless I am just over looking it I don't think you have said what size this tank is. I will say if you are only going to put a Betta in this tank there is no need to grow enough bacteria to process 2 or 3ppm ammonia daily. .5 to 1 should be plenty.

So if I get the numbers to an acceptable amount will the cloudiness go away? I'm still not fully sure why it's cloudy? From what I've heard it's a lot of BB clumping up, please correct me if I'm wrong.
I am thinking it is nothing more than a bacterial bloom. Once the numbers are balanced it should start clearing up. It is also possible it is bacteria that has died if there was an over abundance of bacteria you moved over from your cycled tank. If it wasn't getting as much food as it was used to it could be dying off.

If the PH in this tank has been this low ever since you put the filter and seeded media in it the ammonia has been ammonium and as I said before. The bacteria can process it but not as well as ammonia so some bacteria may be dying off.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #21
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
mattgirl said:
There are certain ways to set up your tank to grow a bacteria that will help remove nitrates but I have never done it so can't give advice on what you need to do to grow it. Just ceramic rings or any media for that matter won't just automatically grow that bacteria. Do a search here on the forum or you may want to start another thread about it and those that know may be able to help you.

Since this is a fishless tank doing a 100% water change would not cause a problem. I am not saying you need to change that much. I just wanted to let you know you can change enough to get your nitrates down and your PH up.
Then I’ll do 70 to 80% water changes every day to remove nitrates and buffer the Ph.


It seems your experience with algae is proving that RO water doesn't prevent it. Chlorine in your tap water isn't a problem as long as you use a water conditioner to remove it. Most water conditioners claI'm to remove heavy metals too. I don't understand why you have dirty water coming from your tap but only you can know that and what is causing it. [/QUOTE said:
Since I’ve put in my RO filter unit ( for drinking and water supply for my tanks) I’ve realised within a month how dirty the filter got due to the water.


I read back through this thread and unless I am just over looking it I don't think you have said what size this tank is. I will say if you are only going to put a Betta in this tank there is no need to grow enough bacteria to process 2 or 3ppm ammonia daily. .5 to 1 should be plenty.[/QUOTE said:
It is a 5 gallon


I am thinking it is nothing more than a bacterial bloom. Once the numbers are balanced it should start clearing up. It is also possible it is bacteria that has died if there was an over abundance of bacteria you moved over from your cycled tank. If it wasn't getting as much food as it was used to it could be dying off. [/QUOTE said:
Ok thank you.

If the PH in this tank has been this low ever since you put the filter and seeded media in it the ammonia has been ammonium and as I said before. The bacteria can process it but not as well as ammonia so some bacteria may be dying off[\QUOTE said:
The Ph was about 5.99 when I got the filter. I’m sorry if the reply is weirdly layout since it’s my first time doing this. And thank you so much for taking your time and answering my questions.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #23
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
First water change about 80% (2 cm above substrate) and it is so much clearer. Thank you for recommending massive water changes!
Image1566822088.536118.jpg

Still a couple more water changes but already looking better!
 

mattgirl

Fishlore Legend
Member
Messages
13,626
Reactions
13,516
Location
Closer to Heaven every day but for now-Arkansas
Experience
More than 10 years
Simply put. Water changes are almost always the answer to most problems in our tanks. Water changes can normally fix problems but I prefer to prevent the problems to begin with by doing big water changes each and every week

. Keeping up with the water changes throughout a fishes life leads to a long healthy life. My 5.5 gallon tank gets no less than 75% of its water changed each and every week and right now it only has 2 tiny cory fry and 1 tiny bristle nose pleco in it. I normally use this tank for my grow out tank.

My 55 gallon and 10 gallon (I call it a 10 gallon but it is a sterlite storage tote and actually could hold 15 or so gallons) get at least 50% water changes weekly and then once a month I do an even bigger one on each of them.

The storage tote is the tank I use to quarantine new plants. All of the ones I get go in this tank first and stay there until they have acclimated to my water. I have some very small mollies living in there with the plants. Once a month I change out about 8 gallons of water. That is an 80% water change.

All of this to say: Do big water changes and you should always have healthy tanks
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #25
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
One more question should I provide fish food or stop until it's cleared?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #27
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
mattgirl said:
The bacteria needs a food source. Decomposing food works but not as well as either fish or bottled ammonia.
Just to clarify bacterial blooms are caused by too much BB correct? And should I decrease the amount from before?
 

bizaliz3

Fishlore Legend
Member
Messages
15,442
Reactions
19,083
Location
Minnesota
Experience
5 to 10 years
TimothyHartwick said:
Just to clarify bacterial blooms are caused by too much BB correct? And should I decrease the amount from before?
I don't believe it means too much BB. From what I understand about bacterial blooms is that the BB needs to settle onto surfaces like substrate, walls, ornaments and mostly in the filter itself.

The reason it happens during cycling is because the BB just hasn't settled in yet. If that makes sense.

That is how I understand it anyway. But I could be wrong.

I don't think there is such a thing as "too much" BB anyway! If there isn't enough ammonia being produced to feed the BB, it will die off. You will only retain however much BB is needed to handle the bioload of the tank. So if you were to have an understocked tank, the BB will be lower. You add a bunch more fish and the BB will have to catch up with the additional bioload, so you can sometimes go through mini-cycles if you add too many new fish at once. And then if you remove a bunch of fish, the amount of BB will lessen...because again, it only survives with an ammonia source. The more ammonia being produced, the more BB can survive. The less being produced, the less BB you will retain.

Someone correct me if I am not explaining that correctly.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #29
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
bizaliz3 said:
I don't believe it means too much BB. From what I understand about bacterial blooms is that the BB needs to settle onto surfaces like substrate, walls, ornaments and mostly in the filter itself.

The reason it happens during cycling is because the BB just hasn't settled in yet. If that makes sense.

That is how I understand it anyway. But I could be wrong.

I don't think there is such a thing as "too much" BB anyway! If there isn't enough ammonia being produced to feed the BB, it will die off. You will only retain however much BB is needed to handle the bioload of the tank. So if you were to have an understocked tank, the BB will be lower. You add a bunch more fish and the BB will have to catch up with the additional bioload, so you can sometimes go through mini-cycles if you add too many new fish at once. And then if you remove a bunch of fish, the amount of BB will lessen...because again, it only survives with an ammonia source. The more ammonia being produced, the more BB can survive. The less being produced, the less BB you will retain.

Someone correct me if I am not explaining that correctly.
If that's correct that was a perfect explanation. It's been like that for nearly 3 weeks, is that normal? I've done an 80% water change today and 80% yesterday it's clear for like 10 mins then it's cloudy again. I'm starting to think it's soil particles since every week the filter floss is really dirty and so is the media on top.
 

bizaliz3

Fishlore Legend
Member
Messages
15,442
Reactions
19,083
Location
Minnesota
Experience
5 to 10 years
TimothyHartwick said:
If that's correct that was a perfect explanation. It's been like that for nearly 3 weeks, is that normal? I've done an 80% water change today and 80% yesterday it's clear for like 10 mins then it's cloudy again. I'm starting to think it's soil particles since every week the filter floss is really dirty and so is the media on top.
It could mean you don't have enough filter media for it to attach to. What kind of filter do you have?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #31
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
bizaliz3 said:
It could mean you don't have enough filter media for it to attach to. What kind of filter do you have?
RS 082A, I put 6 or 7 pieces of media because that's all it could hold.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #32
OP
LiamHartwick

LiamHartwick

Active Member
Member
Messages
211
Reactions
41
Experience
2 years
IMG_1446.JPG

After 3 days and 3 massive water changes

Ph: 6.65

Took 20 minutes to brush off the algae from the glass.
 

New Threads

Similar Threads

Similar Threads

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media

Online statistics

Members online
81
Guests online
1,965
Total visitors
2,046

Aquarium Photo Contests

Aquarium Calculator

Top Bottom