Bottomed Tank

william gray

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So I began with a 10 gallon tank and some goldfish and suckerfish. I decided to go bigger and moved up to a 55 gallon tank. In it I had 6 goldfish, 2 suckerfish, 2 koi, 2 balla sharks, 2 red fin sharks, and 2 Oscars. They were all small so the tank wasn't crowded. Everything was going fine until I moved. In the first day I lost 4 goldfish. Second day lost 2 goldfish and 1 koi. Third day lost the last goldfish and the last koi and 1 suckerfish. The balla and red fin sharks were eaten by the Oscars. So I got rid of the oscars and bought an angel fish and a small catfish. I took out everything and scrubbed everything with just clean water and a clean tank brush. Refilled it and added some chemicals to balance it out. I even added an air pump system in case that was the reason. Got it all back together and tested it. The only thing wrong was hardwater. I put the fish back in and that first night I lost my angel fish. I dont know what happened but no matter what I do since I moved, they all keep dying. I'm pretty sure I'm about to lose my last suckerfish. I love having a tank and fish but I cant figure out why it seems to have bottomed out or how to fix it.
 

sloughdog

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Hardness might be part of the problem but let’s start with the basics.
Was the tank ever cycled? What are the water parameters currently for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH?

When you moved, did you keep the filtration media wet and set the tank up right away? If not, you likely lost your beneficial bacteria thus losing your nitrogrn cycle.
You had serious stocking issues but that’s not the topic of this post.
 

sfsamm

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In addition to what was mentioned above. What are your current water parameters (Ammonia, nitrIte and nitrAte plus pH and kH/gH) if you can get them? What were they before the move?

Hardwater isn't necessarily going to cause your deaths but if there was a large swing from before until now it absolutely could be the problem.

What is your actual stocking now?
 
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william gray

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I never cycled it. I dont know how to cycle it. As far as the water parameters go I'll have to retest it when I get home tomorrow. When we moved it was set up about a day later due to them not transferring the water to the new house. As far as stocking issue everything in the tank was under an inch long.

sfsamm said:
In addition to what was mentioned above. What are your current water parameters (Ammonia, nitrIte and nitrAte plus pH and kH/gH) if you can get them? What were they before the move?

Hardwater isn't necessarily going to cause your deaths but if there was a large swing from before until now it absolutely could be the problem.

What is your actual stocking now?
I'll retest and reply tomorrow. I never tested it before the other day after I moved. My current stock is a small catfish about 2 inches long and a suckerfish about an inch long
 

Mom2some

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Sorry for your losses. Can you please share pictures of your two current fish to help us ID them? In good news - there is a lot of knowledge on this site which can help you select fish which will work well with your tank size & water parameters.
 

Ryan P

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william gray said:
So I have uploaded a few pictures. One of the size of the tank, one of the test strip, and one of each fish.
Base on the result of the test, but still not clear, some parts are blurry, seems like the tank is not cycled, also there's no ammonia reading on the test strip which is one of the important result we need to know, if you can get a hold of API Master Test kit I'd recommend that over any type of test strip (I've read a lot of people getting inaccurate results with strip), but if the readings are correct with Nitrate being 0, your tank is definitely not cycled plus stress of the fish being moved might be the culprit
 

runningslow

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It does appear that your tank isn't cycled. You say everything was fine before the move, but how long had it been set up? You mentioned "adding chemicals to balance it out." What did you add?

In addition to the stress on the fish from the move and likely dealing with a fish-in cycle, I have another theory: Are you using a water conditioner?

If the only thing that changed was the move, is it possible that you moved to a location on a different municipal water system? Cities can use different types of chlorine in their water systems to disinfect the water. Some use chlorine whereas others use chloramine. It might actually vary inside a major metro area like DFW (where I live), where the different municipalities have their own water systems. Its also possible that cities may switch without making a public statement. As I understand it, chlorine will gas out quickly enough on its own and is generally safe for fish. Chloramine on the other hand is lethal and it won't gas out on its own, so the water needs to be treated to be safe.

When I bought my first tank, I was given that warning by the lady who sold me the tank. She said they moved from one area to another and they started losing fish. Sounds similar to your story. She contacted the water company and was told they use chloramine, whereas the previous location used chlorine. Along with the advice, she gave me a bottle of a Tetra water conditioner. I have since switched to using SeaChem Prime. I use it every water change. I honestly don't know what my city uses, but I'm not taking the risk of them using or switching to chloramine unannounced and Prime has other benefits as well.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents.
 

FriarThomasIII

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Yikes man. To cycle the tank, you need to do either a fishless cycle or an in tank fish cycle. To do that, you either let food rot for a few weeks to create ammonia and end up with beneficial bacteria to make the tank safe. Make sure you use some sort of water conditioner to get rid of the heavy metals and chlorine. Both are incredibly dangerous to fish. Stocking wise, most fish were incompatible anyways. And almost all the fish were too big for a 55. Fancy goldfish need 20 gallons for one, and an additional 10 gallons for each additional fish. A 55 gallon could hold about 4, 5 if you want to push it. Bala Sharks get large and need to be in schools of about 4-5 to thrive and get about 14 inches and need about 200 gallons for a school. Oscars are cichlids and are territorial and need space. A 55 is good for only ONE Oscar, and 75 is needed for a pair. Koi need to be in ponds and need about 300 - 500 gallons per fish. Common Plecos get about 12-14 inches and are high waste producers and as such need strong filtration. I would just keep them in ponds. Red tail sharks need to be one to a tank unless the tank is huge, What kind of catfish do you have?
 

Hunter1

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Did you use a declorinator?

That could explain it too.

If you want to be successful, here is what you need to do:

Google the nitrogen cycle. Search here or google which will probably bring you back here.

Get an API master test kit.

If your fish are still alive, do a big water change and add TetraSafeStart + and follow the directions for 14 days, then test.

If fish are gone, start a fishless cycle using pure (no additives) ammonia.

Ask for help on fishlore.

Your sucker fish looks like a common pleco which will be too big for your tank in a year. Since it’s a new tank, with minimal algae, you need to feed it some cucumber pieces. Remove and replace daily.
 
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