Blue Velvet Shrimp Dying

catherinepasmith
  • #1
Hello! I fishless cycled my 21l fluval spec tank. All parameters were good and nitrites and ammonia back to 0 in 12 hours.

I added 10 blue velvet shrimp last Thursday and today there are only two left.

I bought them off of ebay as my lfs does not stock them. I emailed the seller who says he sends 500+ shipments each week and has never had this problem. He has over 1000 positive feedbacks and nothing negative in the last 12 months. So I am inclined to believe him.

They have been slowly dying off and now I am left with two.

I started the tank on 3d of Sept and planted it around the 13th. I did do a water change just soon before adding the shrimp and I wonder if that has affected them. They also arrived in cold water and I slowly acclimatised them in the tank water over an hour, but I wonder if that shocked them?!

I'm pretty gutted. My plan was to set up the shrimp and wait for them to reproduce and then get a betta. But now I have no idea what to do.

My parameters today are 0 for ammonia and nitrite, between 5-10 nitrates and about 7.4ph (we live in a hard water area).

Can anyone give some advice? I don't want to make any more expensive mistakes. I definitely do not want to lose a betta.
 
Rtessy
  • #2
What is your gH, kH ans TDS? Do you have a local pet store that can test that for you?
 
Gypsy13
  • #3
I understand you floated them for an hour. How did you acclimate them to the water parameters?
 
catherinepasmith
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
I do not know the gH, kH and TDS. I will phone the shop and see if they can help. Thanks, will report back.

I float them in the bag for 15 mins and then open it and add 1/4 cup of tank water every 5-10 mins. Then half empty the bag and keep refilling until it is full again and then pour them in the tank. That's how I've acclimatised all my fish and shrimp in my other tank. My shrimp in my other tank have been happy since the day they've been added, however they were not the first to be added to the tank. I cycled with danios before I knew about fishless cycling.
 
Jellibeen
  • #5
I’m sorry for your losses. It’s recommended that shrimp only be introduced into well established tanks. They feed off biofilm and algae that aren’t present in a new tank. I’m not sure if that’s enough to kill them, but it may contribute to the stress of moving. Are you feeding them?
 
catherinepasmith
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
There is plenty of algae in the tank and I added a quarter of an algae wafer on Tuesday. I can't see a layer of biofilm. Thanks, maybe I just added them too soon. I thought after fishless cycle I'd be set!
 
Jellibeen
  • #7
There is plenty of algae in the tank and I added a quarter of an algae wafer on Tuesday. I can't see a layer of biofilm. Thanks, maybe I just added them too soon. I thought after fishless cycle I'd be set!
I don’t know if that is the problem, it’s just a thing I have seen recommended. It seems far off that it would cause so many deaths. Maybe wait another month before getting more.
 
Rtessy
  • #8
Lack of biofilm shouldn't kill off this many. Anything strange about the dead ones? Red heads? Were they entirely red?
 
catherinepasmith
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
They turn orange once dead. If I haven't spotted a dead one I do once they are orange.

Thought i'd share my setup in case there is something wrong. There is a bubble stone in the left corner.

 
BuddyD
  • #10
A bit off subject but where did you get the wood with the green on it?
I want to steal it from you...lol.
 
catherinepasmith
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
Hah, thanks. It is a piece of bonsaI driftwood and I superglued some weeping moss and liverwort to it. It is just starting to recover and grow in new green.
It's from our local fish shop, super silly expensive though. This is my first attempt at planting a tank with purpose. Cant wait for it all to grow in.
 
BuddyD
  • #12
Hah, thanks. It is a piece of bonsaI driftwood and I superglued some weeping moss and liverwort to it. It is just starting to recover and grow in new green.
It's from our local fish shop, super silly expensive though. This is my first attempt at planting a tank with purpose. Cant wait for it all to grow in.

It looks really good.
I'm upgrading to a 60 Gallon on Black Friday in Nov.
I may try to find a similar piece.
 
Gypsy13
  • #13
Hah, thanks. It is a piece of bonsaI driftwood and I superglued some weeping moss and liverwort to it. It is just starting to recover and grow in new green.
It's from our local fish shop, super silly expensive though. This is my first attempt at planting a tank with purpose. Cant wait for it all to grow in.

You’re welcome to scape my tank anytime. Sounds beyond pretty!
 
richiep
  • #14
One thing I can definitely say is you didn't acclamatise them right, not your fault if you don't know but they need to be dripped for anything up to 7 hrs the way you've done it as shocked the shrimp and that's something they can't live with, some people get away with it with cherries but it is bad practice, sorry for your loss and if I seem blunt but there's no other way to put it
 
richiep
  • #15
I've put on a photo of two of my stock tanks aclamating new shrimp, the crystal reds will have 7hrs and the fire reds may have around 5 as they are not as delicate as the crystal reds, I'll then float the containers in the tank for 20 minutes just to bring the temperature back up.
Hope this helps
 

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OdessaDad
  • #16
I agree with Richie D (above)

The best way to acclimatize shrimp is to start a siphon drip using a small air hose and an air valve. Adjust the valve to drip 1 drop per second into the container holding the shrimp. I let mine go for at least 3 hours (or more). Adding the tank water so slowly keeps the shrimp from being shocked by either the temp change and also by chemical change. Of course one should be careful to get the tank water first into roughly the parameters that your shrimp prefer. See you tube about this. It is very important. Just floating the bag in the tank is not enough.

If they are shocked, they will die off in a few days.
Buying your shrimp from a local breeder helps if you have tap water that is really high or low PH. The locally raised shrimp have been partially acclimated already. Amano shrimp really need a lower PH. RCS can be Ok with PH as high as 8.2 if you live in a hard water area. Use RO water to water down the PH and to top off the tank periodically later.

Get your tank parameters adjusted BEFORE ordering any shrimp. Once initially established, they are pretty hardy. Mark's Shrimp on You tube has a hoast of great videos. He knows his stuff.
 

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