Blue Rams Need to Move, Tanks Have Very Different Perameters

PersephonesChild

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So, I have two young GBR's (tentatively looks like a pair, and they get on well) that I purchased about a month ago living in my 10 gallon guppy fry tank. This was never meant to be their permanent home, but my 60 gallonOrinoco region tank was still in the last throes of cycling and the 10 gallon was neutral ph, zero everything, and well established. Knowing rams are notoriously sensitive, and that the store's perameters were more similar to those of the 10, in they went to qt and wait for the 60 to stabilize.

Now my 60 is holding steady, but all that driftwood I put in has the ph at 6.7 (nitrogen and anmonia zero), and in the meantime, the combination of adding the rams and my growing guppies has the nitrates in the 10 slowly climbing (40ppm now, was higher but I did a WC), and ph is now at 7.4 (tap is 7.6, and the WCs are becoming more frequent now to control nitrates).

From what I have read, my 60 actually has much more ideal ph, and the large size plus fewer occupants means the plants will keep nitrogen in check. BUT, the rams are doing pretty darn well currently, and I'm really worried about the ph difference shocking them to death.

How can I acclimate these guys safely? I made it past the "notorious" petstore-to-tank survival test, and it would kill me to loose them now. Should I just start adding water from my 60 to the 10 instead of using conditioned tap water for WC's?
 

Claire Bear

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Hi, you are talking about a significant difference in ph. If it were me, I would lfollow these steps:
1. Use a container that can hold at least a gallon or so of water.
2. Use the 10 gallon tank water and add about two cups to the container (if the temperature of the two tanks is the same you will not have to worry about trying to equalize the temperature)
3 Put the fish in said container
4 add about 1/2 cup of water from the 60 gallon tank- do this about every 15 minutes or so over a couple of hours-at least 8 times.
5 Then add the fish to the 60 gallon tank but throw out the water from your bucket. and over a period of a couple of hours add about a 1/2 cup of water to the bucket.
Your fish should be fine as long as you do this slowly-dont rush but take your time.
 
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PersephonesChild

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Sounds sort of like how I add brand new fish, except much slower and not in a bag. I'd actually considered something similar to what you discribed using my little 2.5g hospital tank, but I was kind of scared because (as you said), that's a pretty big ph change and I didn't know how slow I should do the transition.

Now, a related question/issue: my friend came by with my birthday gift this afternoon. She got me ANOTHER pair of rams, though the new ones are a bit larger and are the longfin variety (but not balloon bodied, for which I am glad). She said she'd picked them because they appeared to be paired already in the tank at the store (sweet!!). Since the 60 is geared for rams, I put them in the big tank directly (floated, then added 50% tank water, added more tank water to 75%, then straight in). So far no hard breathing or stress indications, though they are hiding under the driftwood from the scary cardinal tetras and oto cats (wait until the cories find them!).

So, are they all going to play nice (at least non violent) when the regular rams go in? Its a well-planted tank with tons of hiding spots and broken line of sight, but I have read that pairs can be pretty territorial. The birthday fish are about 25% larger, and now sort of have claI'm since they are already in.

I've wanted rams forever (which is why my friend bought me the new pair; in fact, half my gifts were new fish for the Orinoco tank because I talk about it all the time, lol), and now I just don't want to screw up and kill them.
 
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PersephonesChild

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Oh, also the 10 gallon is at 82° because it is a nursery for guppy fry and therefore heated, and the 60 gallonis at around 78° (haven't added a heater yet since its been really hot here). Is that going to matter much?
 

bermese2002

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I think you should be fine with 2 pairs as long as they can each set up a territory. Your tank is big enough

At least that what I've been told and am planning to do as I probably won't be able to get a pair. I'm getting 4/5 juveniles and will see how it goes.
 
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PersephonesChild

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I was sort of planning to get several young ones too in hopes of getting at least one pair to breed. The friend that bought me the new fish keeps mostly salt tanks, but she knows enough about freshwater to realize an established ciclid pair was a lucky find at the store. Its nice to have fishkeeping friends.
 
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PersephonesChild

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Ok, they are in the 2 gallon pitcher that I use for water changes. The first bit of new tank water just went in. They are not pleased about being caught, and the female has slightly reddish gills, presumably because the nitrates have been so high lately, so I added a teeny bit of stress coat. The male looks fine, but I'm sure it wasn't good for him to be in that tank anymore either.

Fingers crossed.
 

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