60 Gallon Tank Blue Gularis Killifish Tank Mates (Tiger Barbs)

GyokuJyn

I am finding conflicting info online about stocking Blue Gularis Killifish with Tiger Barbs. Does anyone have experience with these two? Other suggestions of tank mates would be appreciated from those experienced with Blue Gularis killies, as well.

Background: I am setting up a 60 gallon hex. Plan is to provide plenty of driftwood and heavy planting to mimic natural river/pond areas and provide hiding places for everyone. Looking at stocking 1 male Blue Gularis and 2-3 females, 10-12 tiger barbs, 8-10 Emerald corydoras and probably some shrimp (I would like some blue dreams, but I am concerned they will be a delicious snack for the killies, so more likely something with better camo, like amanos). Am I missing anything?
 

GyokuJyn

Afternoon bump?

I've looked through other forum threads on the subject and found people making suggestions, but really hoping to hear from actual long-term Blue Gularis owners, too.
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids

SnookusFish may be able to help.
 
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chromedome52

Camo would not save your shrimp from a large male Gularis. I would be concerned that the flowing fins of the killifish would be too tempting to the Tiger Barbs. And if the Corys are too small, the Gularis will try to eat them, too, possibly ending in the death of both fish. IME, Blue Gularis tend to be rather piscivorous.

Dwarf Red Gularis, which is actually just a variant population of Fp. sjoestedti, usually doesn't get as large, only reaching about 4 inches, and they don't develop as much finnage. I think they are also slightly more colorful.
 
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GyokuJyn

Camo would not save your shrimp from a large male Gularis. I would be concerned that the flowing fins of the killifish would be too tempting to the Tiger Barbs. And if the Corys are too small, the Gularis will try to eat them, too, possibly ending in the death of both fish. IME, Blue Gularis tend to be rather piscivorous.

Dwarf Red Gularis, which is actually just a variant population of Fp. sjoestedti, usually doesn't get as large, only reaching about 4 inches, and they don't develop as much finnage. I think they are also slightly more colorful.
Thank you so much for taking the time to respond!

I was under the impression that the Blue Gularis got to be around 4-5 inches, so the Dwarf Red would only be about an inch smaller. Is that inch enough to alleviate the concerns with the shrimp and corys being on the menu? FWIW, I specifically was looking at the Emerald corys because they get to be about 3 inches--hopefully too large to be eaten, as long as I'm keeping only adults in that tank.

I'm definitely worried about the tigers nipping on those long, beautiful killifish fins. I had heard that if you keep them in groups of 8 and in a large enough tank, they become less aggressive towards other fish, but I haven't kept barbs of any kind since I was a kid, so I don't know how accurate that is.
 
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chromedome52

Having seen a 7 inch male Blue Gularis, and numerous 6 inchers, I can say that the Dwarf Red is considerably smaller (hence the word Dwarf!). I think any strain of sjoestedti will pursue the shrimp, as their mouth is much larger than you expect. As for the Corys, if you start out with them in the large size, you could be all right.

I think the combination of relatively slow moving and flowing fins are going to just be too tempting to the barbs. I've kept fewer Tiger Barbs without them nipping other fish, but all the fish in the tank were quite capable of taking care of themselves.
 
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GyokuJyn

Having seen a 7 inch male Blue Gularis, and numerous 6 inchers, I can say that the Dwarf Red is considerably smaller (hence the word Dwarf!). I think any strain of sjoestedti will pursue the shrimp, as their mouth is much larger than you expect. As for the Corys, if you start out with them in the large size, you could be all right.

I think the combination of relatively slow moving and flowing fins are going to just be too tempting to the barbs. I've kept fewer Tiger Barbs without them nipping other fish, but all the fish in the tank were quite capable of taking care of themselves.
Wow, I didn't realize it was such a big difference! I'll definitely take a look at the Dwarf Red instead, then.

Fin nipping is my fear with the tiger barbs. I just love the stripes! But, it's definitely more important to have a healthy tank with safe, happy fish, so I think it's best to look at alternatives to the barbs.

I really appreciate your input, thank you!
 
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BigManAquatics

One thing to remember with tiger barbs, 12 is a greta number for a school of them, they will spend most their time nipping each other! But yeah, some fins are just too long to not be tempting targets...
 
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Hellfishguy

Desmopuntius hexazona - just as attractive as tiger barbs, but calmer and more peaceful.
 
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GyokuJyn

Desmopuntius hexazona - just as attractive as tiger barbs, but calmer and more peaceful.
Ooo, thanks for the tip!
 
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