Blue-green Algae

appcontrol

Well Known Member
Messages
670
Reaction score
180
Points
78
Experience
1 year
So i have small small amount of cyanobacteri or blue - green algae on gravel. So how to get rid of it in time?
I was thinking covering tank for 3 days, no food, no co2 or ferts and after that do 35% wc? But i would wait one more week because my corys are only for three days in tank and i want to monitor them little bit longer.
 

DoubleDutch

Fishlore Legend
Messages
18,256
Reaction score
12,194
Points
798
Experience
More than 10 years
It re cyanobacteria. My experience is there is an unbalance / shortage in ferts (including nitrates / phosfates). No food / ferts won't do the job (in the contrary).
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5

appcontrol

Well Known Member
Messages
670
Reaction score
180
Points
78
Experience
1 year
I don't have a picture now. Yea i have that ciano algae and fuzz algae little bit. I don't dose macroelements yet because nitrate readings are 18 most of the time to be honest phosphate i don't know.
I have 20w light for 8 hours now reduced to 7 hours per day. I am using 1,8ml of liquid co2 daily and every other day 0,4ml of profito micronutrients. For substrat i have gravel and jbl balls like root sticks. Most of plants is growing fine. But those algae growing too

Do you have a picture?

Corydoras won’t eat cyanobacteria.
I know, they arent in tank to.get rid of the algae i just like them

And btw would be good idea to invest in dennerle bio co2 system until i get real one in few months? Would that help algae problem?
 

musserump09

Well Known Member
Messages
851
Reaction score
141
Points
73
Experience
3 years
I would cut out dosing co2 since your plants are growing well then let them produce the co2 naturally. This should help balance competition and reduce algea.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7

appcontrol

Well Known Member
Messages
670
Reaction score
180
Points
78
Experience
1 year
I would cut out dosing co2 since your plants are growing well then let them produce the co2 naturally. This should help balance competition and reduce algea.
I am adding liquid co2 so to cut dose or to stop adding co2 at all?
 

musserump09

Well Known Member
Messages
851
Reaction score
141
Points
73
Experience
3 years
I am adding liquid co2 so to cut dose or to stop adding co2 at all?
The Photosynthesis process is going produce co2. If your plants are growing well then they are doing that themselves. Plus adding more is creating a imbalance of nutrients. When unbalance minerals are present algae has food source to bloom or grow. Cut back and see if your able to get the balance back in favor of the plants.

All I do is dose flourish twice a week. Please excuse my snails
1525550123538.jpg
 

Fahn

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,430
Reaction score
3,601
Points
458
Cyano is typically caused by the following:
-warm, stagnant water
-high concentration of organics in water (high nitrates, excess food and poop, excess fertilizers, etc)
-prolonged exposure to bright lighting

So, the ways to fix it are:
-increase and improve water circulation
-do heavy water changes and gravel cleanings; live plants will help soak up excess nitrates and organics
-reduce lighting duration and/or intensity.

Hydrogen peroxide and erythromycin will kill it but may harm your cycle. The best cure is prevention by solving root causes and eradicating the current outbreak.
 

Handelma

Valued Member
Messages
156
Reaction score
23
Points
53
Experience
Just started
I had a similar problem. I turned off my tank lights for 2 weeks, and also did 3 days of full blackout. Then I reduced lighting for a few more weeks. The blue-green algea is much much better, but I do still see small spots here and there.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #11

appcontrol

Well Known Member
Messages
670
Reaction score
180
Points
78
Experience
1 year
Cyano is typically caused by the following:
-warm, stagnant water
-high concentration of organics in water (high nitrates, excess food and poop, excess fertilizers, etc)
-prolonged exposure to bright lighting

So, the ways to fix it are:
-increase and improve water circulation
-do heavy water changes and gravel cleanings; live plants will help soak up excess nitrates and organics
-reduce lighting duration and/or intensity.

Hydrogen peroxide and erythromycin will kill it but may harm your cycle. The best cure is prevention by solving root causes and eradicating the current outbreak.
I have two diagonally installed inside filtes so water flow is great, second i gravel clean every 5,6 or max 7 days. So probably the light i have 1w per gallon of led light that is working for 8 hours, from yesterday 7 hours.
I am not sure anymore i am on business trip for two weeks now so i cant do anything at this moment. But some tell me that too low or too high nitrate can be problem. So when i come back home i will test nitrate if they are too low i will start adding some macronutrients. Second i have alot of plants like 70-80% of tank is planted. For now i will cut down liquid co2 on 1ml per day and 0,3 micronutrients every other day will stay like that. Lights for 7 hours. And i will mabey try just to get rid of it while i am trying to fix core problem easy life blue exit its not on antibiotic base and it's safe so no harm will be done. Dose this sound good?
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom