Blue Gourami help - sore, scar or scab?

goury

Member
Hello there! I've noticed that my rescue Blue GouramI (or opaline, or three-spot; there really isn't a consensus hah) has this pink indent on her left side. It looks like a serration, like if she scratched a decoration by darting too quickly. I doubt it was a bite because the only tank mates I have with her are danios, tetras, a sailfin plecostamus and a few ghost and amano shrimp. She didn't have it before I rescued or, or if she did I didn't notice.
This has been present for awhile, and it just showed up one day as if she were cut, not entirely bleeding but it looked fresh. I waited overnight seeing as I didn't have any sort of treatment to help, and later, it didn't look quite as gnarly and seemed to be healing itself, so for a couple of months I let it be. Now I'm looking at it and I'm just not sure if it is supposed to look the way it does. I don't now how scarring and scabbing works underwater for fish so maybe I'm overreacting but I don't want to be too careless about them because I don't wish for them to suffer. I suspect it's bacterial, and I have coppersafe and meth blue for treatments if it is so but I'm really hoping it's not.
The gouramI herself acts quite healthy and responsive. Color is fine. She's always darting to the glass whenever I walk by for mealtime, and right now she's playing in the airstone. She isn't very aggressive with the other fish and isn't very nippy. She mostly keep to herself, unless she gets to close to the pleco trying to eat his algae wafers, then she'll get a fin or too.
Some stats:
Tank is 32 gallons, a bit on the long side. I'm not sure what the exact build is but the filter is Aquatech, designed for the tank.
I have a few live plants; java fern, some unnamed one I can't recall the name of for my life, a marimo ball, and immature lilies. Also some good ole algae that my pleco can't get enough of. What isn't alive are my silk and plastic plants, and aquarium safe decorations.
Water levels, like ammonia nitrates etc., are normal. The water is on the hard side but where I live that's all I have to give them and I do rigorous treatments before putting in more water. I don't do water changes as often as I should (every two weeks or so) because I get quite busy with university but I'm working quite hard to amend that. Water is a bit cloudy right now because I just did a water change, and whenever I switch it out with the brand of filter I have, the water gets cloudy and settles after a week even with cloudy water treatment, so I leave it be.
Two months ago we did have an ich outbreak, not a single fish was devoid of white spots. I did lose a couple of fish from that (a tetra had swim bladder disease, from pet store, and a few danios), but I was able to treat it with meth blue before too many succumbed. I have had a few cases of fin rot, and only one fish passed from that but I suspect he brought it with him, since I had just got him from my pet store and he was the only one I couldn't save from fin rot. I didn't have a case of either disease before getting these new batches of fish. Both diseases were treated with meth blue; ich came back a few weeks later but I caught it very early and killed it off with meth blue again.

And some pictures! It's so hard getting clear one but luckily she wanted to model today. She did just eat so that's why she looks a bit big right now:
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Hi, welcome to Fishlore

She doesn’t look like she’s in great shape, in terms body shape which is likely genetics. I’m not sure what exactly the wound is, it could be from the Pleco but importantly keeping water well maintained will help with the healing.

How often and what do you feed her?

“Three Spot” is the common name for the species but Trichopedus Trichopeterus would avoid any confusion

edit: yours would be considered an “Opaline” because of the black pigment that makes up the Three Spots being scattered around the body.
 
  • Thread Starter

goury

Member
You know what? I could have sworn I was feeding my fish freshwater flakes. I just took a closer look and apparently, it's tropical fish flakes. A completely different diet, I feel like such an idiot. I'm positive it's not a major problem but I will definitely go into town tomorrow to buy some proper food.
As for how often, it's a pinch of these flakes every night. Every three to five days I drop in an algae wafer for the pleco.
Also thank you for helping me identify her!

jinjerJOSH22 said:
Hi, welcome to Fishlore

She doesn’t look like she’s in great shape, in terms body shape which is likely genetics. I’m not sure what exactly the wound is, it could be from the Pleco but importantly keeping water well maintained will help with the healing.

How often and what do you feed her?

“Three Spot” is the common name for the species but Trichopedus Trichopeterus would avoid any confusion

edit: yours would be considered an “Opaline” because of the black pigment that makes up the Three Spots being scattered around the body.
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
goury said:
You know what? I could have sworn I was feeding my fish freshwater flakes. I just took a closer look and apparently, it's tropical fish flakes. A completely different diet, I feel like such an idiot. I'm positive it's not a major problem but I will definitely go into town tomorrow to buy some proper food.
As for how often, it's a pinch of these flakes every night. Every three to five days I drop in an algae wafer for the pleco.
Also thank you for helping me identify her!
Hold your horses! GouramI are tropical fish, the food should be fine
I do recommend occasionally feeding some frozen or even live food. A variety is often best.
 
  • Thread Starter

goury

Member
Oh okay haha, thank you. I will grab some live bugs instead. Thank you so much for your help
jinjerJOSH22 said:
Hold your horses! GouramI are tropical fish, the food should be fine
I do recommend occasionally feeding some frozen or even live food. A variety is often best.
 

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