Blood parrot, Male or female?

Soksok
Member

IMG_20210504_164738.jpg

Male or female?
 
RayClem
Member
Because blood parrots are hybrids of two species, it is highly unusual for them to reproduce. If you do have a male and a female, it is possible that the female will lay eggs and the male will attempt to fertilize them. However, males are typically sterile, so the eggs rarely hatch. I understand that it might be possible for a hybrid female to mate with a non-hybrid male cichlid and have viable eggs.

I know the males become larger than females, but otherwise, I do not know how to distinguish the sexes as I have never kept them.
 
MacZ
Member
RayClem said:
Because blood parrots are hybrids of two species,
Genetic analysis has brought to light they are not hybrids but a heavily genetically defected form of red devil cichlids (Amphilophus labiatus). But the genetic defects make most of them sterile nonetheless.
 
RayClem
Member
MacZ said:
Genetic analysis has brought to light they are not hybrids but a heavily genetically defected form of red devil cichlids (Amphilophus labiatus). But the genetic defects make most of them sterile nonetheless.
According to The Blood Parrot Cichlid Fish Is a Controversial Hybrid, the blood parrot is a hybrid cross between the midas cichlid (Amphilophus citrinellus) and the redhead cichlid (Paraneetroplus synspilus).

I have always considered them to be hybrids, but I am not an expert is fish genetics, so I will leave that to others.
 
MacZ
Member
Right now I only got the citation at hand, but look for this article: Hanneman, E. (2000): The Blood-Red Parrot: Hybrid or Mutation? Tropical Fish Hobbyist 69 (4): 94-97.
 
RayClem
Member
MacZ said:
Right now I only got the citation at hand, but look for this article: Hanneman, E. (2000): The Blood-Red Parrot: Hybrid or Mutation? Tropical Fish Hobbyist 69 (4): 94-97.
I guess my concern is that if it is a mutation rather than a hybrid and the males are sterile, how to they manage to continue the genetic line? I guess it would take a lot of DNA testing to resolve the issue.
 
MacZ
Member
Agree. In the end I don't have to care, they are listed as a so-called "Qualzucht" (literary "tortured breed") in my country for having so many genetic disadvantages. These breeds are super rarely found in the trade here.
 
Mcasella
Member
Without seeing the breeding tube you cannot sex them. They are not a sexually dimorphic cichlid where the sex characteristics are easy to see (like rams where the females have pink bellies or jacks were the male have larger size and large heads/lips) similar to domestic angelfish where you cannot tell male or female accurately without a tube (as females can grow a smaller nuchal hump - only males with a massive nuchal hump early on as easy to sex for angels).

Sometimes a blood parrot female will spawn on her own, but I've mostly seen them needing a partner to encourage spawning.
 
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