Blackwater for betta - Page 2

Kribensis27

Would floaters work? And how would i acclimate a betta to a blackwater tank? Or would it just be like a normal acclimation. Sorry for asking so many questions, just dont wanna hurt any
Some floaters do better than others. For me, Salvinia and frogbit have done the best.

It's best to slowly introduce the betta to these conditions to avoid stress. I usually start the tank out with clear water, and introduce the betta then. After that, I slowly add botanicals in order to turn it into a blackwater tank.

Questions are fine, it's basically what this forum is for.
 

grac3

Ohh right that makes sense. Thanks so much! Also one last one, what other than almond leaves could i put inside? Like to taint the water
 

Kribensis27

Ohh right that makes sense. Thanks so much! Also one last one, what other than almond leaves could i put inside? Like to taint the water
Along with catappa leaves, I use oak leaves, mulberry leaves, magnolia leaves, banana leaves, guava leaves, elm leaves, alder cones, and jackfruit leaves (I buy some of these online), although you can use many more. Those are just the ones I've tried.

You can also buy various seed pods and other things online.
 

MacZ

Ohh right that makes sense. Thanks so much! Also one last one, what other than almond leaves could i put inside? Like to taint the water

You don't taint the water, you tint it.

You can use: Oak, Beech, Birch, Maple, Walnut, Wild Cherry, Elm and Alder. Also alder cones and walnut shells.

Important: The leaves have to be brown and dry. Only leaves that the trees threw themselves are good to use.
 

Kribensis27

You don't taint the water, you tint it.

You can use: Oak, Beech, Birch, Maple, Walnut, Wild Cherry, Elm and Alder. Also alder cones and walnut shells.

Important: The leaves have to be brown and dry. Only leaves that the trees threw themselves are good to use.
Never knew about the walnut shells! I'll have to try that sometime!
 

MacZ

Never knew about the walnut shells! I'll have to try that sometime!

Takes quite some time to get them to sink though. I would boil them for an hour. Also you can dye fabric with them. In the Middle Ages they would use them to dye clothes.
 

grac3

You don't taint the water, you tint it.

You can use: Oak, Beech, Birch, Maple, Walnut, Wild Cherry, Elm and Alder. Also alder cones and walnut shells.

Important: The leaves have to be brown and dry. Only leaves that the trees threw themselves are good to use.
haha thanks! would algae be a problem?
 

MacZ

I only see algae in the few centimeters below the surface. Below the 10cm-mark there are almost no algae anymore.

And I consider algae normal in a biotope tank. Unless it's black beard algae or cyanobacteria I don't care about algae in blackwater.

The few that I have are diatoms on the pennywort leaves that are right under the lights at the surface.
 

Rachaeljuno

I really want a blackwater aquarium and I’m wondering if a betta would be happy in one? And what plants would do well in one?
Betta love lots of tannins It helps a lot with their overall health as well so I definitely say go for it!
 

MacZ

And what plants would do well in one?

I totally overlooked that one.

Anubias always work. Otherwise in blackwater almost only floating plants really work. I have the Brassilian Pennywort (Hydrocotyle leucocephala) spread almost over the whole of the surface, some patches of Salvinia auriculata and some frogbit (Limnobium laevigatum). To really suck up waste like Nitrates I also have a Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) plant on the emersed parts of the driftwood with the roots hanging in the water.
As an experiment, just to see if it really is the light I also put two small Staurogyne repens in the substrate... they don't grow, but they also don't wilt away.
 

grac3

I totally overlooked that one.

Anubias always work. Otherwise in blackwater almost only floating plants really work. I have the Brassilian Pennywort (Hydrocotyle leucocephala) spread almost over the whole of the surface, some patches of Salvinia auriculata and some frogbit (Limnobium laevigatum). To really suck up waste like Nitrates I also have a Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) plant on the emersed parts of the driftwood with the roots hanging in the water.
As an experiment, just to see if it really is the light I also put two small Staurogyne repens in the substrate... they don't grow, but they also don't wilt away.
thanks
 

Catappa

I'll reply later. Please let me know what kind of Betta you have. I have "the" Betta book which shows their wild habitats and lists their plants and foods, conditions, etc. So I can let you know what kind of floating plants grow there. Cryptocorynes are always in their habitats.

There are Catappa extracts sold, but are really only suitable for experts, as it is easy to overdose. I would advise you to be very careful about adding almond leaves (Catappa), aldercones, etc. and do it very, very slowly and continue to test the water, as the pH can plummet quickly! Give your tank LOTS of time to turn tinted.
There are also nice-looking little tubes made from rolled-up Catappa leaves that can be used. I don't know how big your tank is, but don't overdo it because of the pH lowering effect.
 

MacZ

I'll reply later. Please let me know what kind of Betta you have. I have "the" Betta book which shows their wild habitats and lists their plants and foods, conditions, etc. So I can let you know what kind of floating plants grow there. Cryptocorynes are always in their habitats.

There are Catappa extracts sold, but are really only suitable for experts, as it is easy to overdose. I would advise you to be very careful about adding almond leaves (Catappa), aldercones, etc. and do it very, very slowly and continue to test the water, as the pH can plummet quickly! Give your tank LOTS of time to turn tinted.
There are also nice-looking little tubes made from rolled-up Catappa leaves that can be used. I don't know how big your tank is, but don't overdo it because of the pH lowering effect.

Good call about the South East Asian plants. But you can also research that online.

The pH lowering effect of botanicals depends very much on the KH. And even with a KH of 0, like I have, it takes a lot of material and a lot of time to lower pH significantly. The O2-reduction during the first 48h after adding botanicals is the bigger problem.
pH crashes are unheard of in botanical style blackwater tanks to my knowledge.
 

Catappa

Good call about the South East Asian plants. But you can also research that online.

The pH lowering effect of botanicals depends very much on the KH. And even with a KH of 0, like I have, it takes a lot of material and a lot of time to lower pH significantly. The O2-reduction during the first 48h after adding botanicals is the bigger problem.
pH crashes are unheard of in botanical style blackwater tanks to my knowledge.
Thank you. I kept many blackwater tanks over the years, but it's been quite a few years now. I never experienced a crash, but was always warned. (I also used ro water and have my device still, but really don't feel up to going through all that at the present time.)
 

grac3

I'll reply later. Please let me know what kind of Betta you have. I have "the" Betta book which shows their wild habitats and lists their plants and foods, conditions, etc. So I can let you know what kind of floating plants grow there. Cryptocorynes are always in their habitats.

There are Catappa extracts sold, but are really only suitable for experts, as it is easy to overdose. I would advise you to be very careful about adding almond leaves (Catappa), aldercones, etc. and do it very, very slowly and continue to test the water, as the pH can plummet quickly! Give your tank LOTS of time to turn tinted.
There are also nice-looking little tubes made from rolled-up Catappa leaves that can be used. I don't know how big your tank is, but don't overdo it because of the pH lowering effect.
i think he's a betta splendens? thanks for that, i'll make sure to slowly add in the leaves and monitor the pH. also would sticks and twigs from my garden work too? of course i'll boil them first and all
 

MacZ

Thank you. I kept many blackwater tanks over the years, but it's been quite a few years now. I never experienced a crash, but was always warned. (I also used ro water and have my device still, but really don't feel up to going through all that at the present time.)

The crash is an urban legend, more or less.
It can only happen under 2 circumstances: a. someone uses pH-down products incorrectly with RO and b. when people have soft water and don't do any maintenance. With high nitrates pH drops due to nitrate being solved as nitric acid in water. When these build up more and more the KH gets balanced out and at one point the balance shifts from neutral to strongly acidic and that's when the crash can happen. Usually people would notice in time. So basically only unqualified tempering or neglect can cause a pH crash.
 

Catappa

The crash is an urban legend, more or less.
It can only happen under 2 circumstances: a. someone uses pH-down products incorrectly with RO and b. when people have soft water and don't do any maintenance. With high nitrates pH drops due to nitrate being solved as nitric acid in water. When these build up more and more the KH gets balanced out and at one point the balance shifts from neutral to strongly acidic and that's when the crash can happen. Usually people would notice in time. So basically only unqualified tempering or neglect can cause a pH crash.
Thank you so much! I love being set straight! I used to contribute professionally to travel book publishers (even CNN and other prominent info media). I was very devoted to giving honest reviews (never accepted free meals from restaurants, free lodgings from hotels, etc.) and I always researched independently by either visiting venues or interviewing owners by telephone. I can't tell you how many times the business I was interviewing rejoiced that they had been contacted -- sometimes for the first time ever (!) and asked me to set the record straight. I discovered that so many "colleagues" were lazy and just copied and reworded information from other publications. That's how misinformation is spread and "urban legends" become truth!

Some years ago, I was fortunate to meet a retired tropical fish expert. (Unfortunately, I've forgotten his name.) He was well-known in import circles, because he had been involved with many top import and export businesses, in the Netherlands and some Asian countries. I remember he had also dealt with Ruinemans. He told me so much about the way fish were overdosed with medications in their huge shipping containers and how that led to many of the current health problems. He taught me a lot at the time, most of which I've probably forgotten (due to my stroke impairing memory).

I once tried to share some of the info on a Dutch aquarium forum and you wouldn't believe the backlash I received! No, nothing this man had told me was true -- you only had to check the internet and current books to find the truth. SIGH. This seems to happen with many things nowadays.

Sorry to be so long-winded, but I am really grateful to you for what you've now taught me.
 

MacZ

Thank you so much! I love being set straight! I used to contribute professionally to travel book publishers (even CNN and other prominent info media). I was very devoted to giving honest reviews (never accepted free meals from restaurants, free lodgings from hotels, etc.) and I always researched independently by either visiting venues or interviewing owners by telephone. I can't tell you how many times the business I was interviewing rejoiced that they had been contacted -- sometimes for the first time ever (!) and asked me to set the record straight. I discovered that so many "colleagues" were lazy and just copied and reworded information from other publications. That's how misinformation is spread and "urban legends" become truth!

During my studies I learned how legends come to be (History, Cultural History and Literature for more than one culture) and I did some freelance writing for a while. I was shocked to find I'm the only one to look for the stories themselves.

Some years ago, I was fortunate to meet a retired tropical fish expert. (Unfortunately, I've forgotten his name.) He was well-known in import circles, because he had been involved with many top import and export businesses, in the Netherlands and some Asian countries. I remember he had also dealt with Ruinemans. He told me so much about the way fish were overdosed with medications in their huge shipping containers and how that led to many of the current health problems. He taught me a lot at the time, most of which I've probably forgotten (due to my stroke impairing memory).

Funnily enough I would bet my fish were imported via Ruinemans, because I know my LFS buys from them. But yes, the health problems due to overmedication are also one of my concerns and get better known. People still don't learn from it and chugg tons of meds into their tanks nowerdays.

I once tried to share some of the info on a Dutch aquarium forum and you wouldn't believe the backlash I received! No, nothing this man had told me was true -- you only had to check the internet and current books to find the truth. SIGH. This seems to happen with many things nowadays.

Dutch and German aquarium forums are... ugh. Hard to stomach sometimes.

Your welcome. If I see that correct I'm only about half your age.
 

Catappa

LOL, I'm most likely the oldest member of this forum. But age has little to do with wisdom.
 

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