Betta To A New Tank

jojo_47

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Hey. So I did all the homework I had to before I got my betta fish. I cycled my 3.5-gallon tank using Seachem Stability for about three days and I also used some leftover fish food I had from a failed attempt at fish keeping earlier this year to cycle the tank faster. Today I went to Petsmart had the water tested so everything is good. Ammonia is at zero, Nitrate is zero and Nitrite at zero. So I bought a Dragon-Scaled Betta (he was pretty healthy to my surprise and very active), I acclimated him the water temperature and he's in the tank now and he's swimming up and down the tank he looks like he's taking in a lot of air. Should I be worried? or his he just acclimating?
 

mgarza

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I have 3 betta tanks and was always told I didn't need to cycle those tanks, but I still put in a little beneficial bacteria. Mine have always "panted" a little, but they do that after a water change as well. Did you get a " betta log"? Mine are always in them. And I'm sure you know bettas get air from the top of the water so they are always coming up to the surface to breath.
 

Rich Johnson

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Bettas are labyrinth fishes, which means they sometimes go to the surface to take in air. So this might not be anything to worry about. I assume you have a filter or airstone in the tank, right? As long as the water gets enough oxygen, your betta should be okay.
 

BettaFishKeeper4302

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jojo_47 said:
Hey. So I did all the homework I had to before I got my betta fish. I cycled my 3.5-gallon tank using Seachem Stability for about three days and I also used some leftover fish food I had from a failed attempt at fish keeping earlier this year to cycle the tank faster. Today I went to Petsmart had the water tested so everything is good. Ammonia is at zero, Nitrate is zero and Nitrite at zero. So I bought a Dragon-Scaled Betta (he was pretty healthy to my surprise and very active), I acclimated him the water temperature and he's in the tank now and he's swimming up and down the tank he looks like he's taking in a lot of air. Should I be worried? or his he just acclimating?
Yes, bettas get air.from the surface. Your betta will be more than fine just give it afew days.
 
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jojo_47

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mgarza said:
I have 3 betta tanks and was always told I didn't need to cycle those tanks, but I still put in a little beneficial bacteria. Mine have always "panted" a little, but they do that after a water change as well. Did you get a " betta log"? Mine are always in them. And I'm sure you know bettas get air from the top of the water so they are always coming up to the surface to breath.
I didnt get a betta log but I have the tank set up with a betta leag hammock and two hiding places.
 

Cam1112

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Betta’s take a few days sometimes to get used to their new tanks. I know mine didn’t want to come out of hiding at the bottom of the tank for the first three days. It’s also quite common for them to refuse food for a few days while they adjust. Mine is eating and active and likes showing off his fins, he adjusted after about four or five days.
 
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jojo_47

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75g Discus Tank said:
Also, your tank isn’t cycled. Any tank should have some nitrates.
Thank you for telling me! The Petsmart employee said every thing was fine to put in a fish. I would have never known! Is there anyway that I can help the nitrate levels?
 

75g Discus Tank

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Well, nitrate will come naturally by the nitrogen cycle.

First, your fish will create the waste(poop, uneaten food, etc.). This will become ammonia. Then, the bacteria will consume the ammonia(highly toxic to fish) and make it into nitrites(still highly toxic). After the nitrifying bacteria consumed the nitrites, it turns into nitrates, which is deadly in high concentrations. This should be taken care of with water changes.
 
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