Betta Questions

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by Sorcha Renee, Jul 30, 2017.

  1. Sorcha Renee

    Sorcha Renee New Member Member

    3a769cfdfdbd5b3ce4b9150781417570.jpg


    This is Dorian, my Betta!
    He recently got some tank mates and they are all doing super great together!!! I did research before getting him tank mates and from what I gathered is it kinda depends on the temperament of your fish on how well they do together (as long as they are compatible). So, I'm super happy they are getting along!
    I recently read about moss balls and how they can create something for Bettas to play with as well as maintaining the tank. Would these be ok for his tank mates? cc8bbbb68c94574b57473b9502342782.jpg

    The water looks a little cloudy in this picture, but I did a water change so it looks much better now!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 30, 2017
  2. FishFish221

    FishFish221 Well Known Member Member

    Did you do research on the requirements of the tankmates?
    Glofish Tetras need at least 20 gallons and are not temperture compatible with bettas.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Sorcha Renee

    Sorcha Renee New Member Member

    Yes, everything I've read said it was ok!

    I'm looking into getting a bigger tank too.
     




  4. FishFish221

    FishFish221 Well Known Member Member

    Glofish tetras are also schooling fish and should be kept in schools of at least 6. They might nip at the betta's tail too.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Sorcha Renee

    Sorcha Renee New Member Member

    They swim together all the time and there has been no nipping so far!
    My Betta has plenty of places to hid in this tank, so he can hide when (if ) he feels stressed! I've seen MANY videos of these fish together! I appreciate your tips though. I will continue watching to assure this doesn't happen!
     
  6. Laxin10

    Laxin10 Valued Member Member

    As time goes on glo fish tetras can be very nippy without a school. If you are unwilling to rehome the tetras or buy a bigger tank, constantly watch the bettas fins and compare them to how they look in the picture you posted. Just because you don't see any nipping doesn't mean it's not happening or will happen in the future.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Sorcha Renee

    Sorcha Renee New Member Member

    I am looking for a bigger tank...
     
  8. penguin02

    penguin02 Well Known Member Member

    .........how big is your tank? It looks to be tiny. Bettas need at LEAST 2.5, preferably 5 if you want to see them at their best. And everything stated above about glofish tetras is true. I used to keep one in a six gallon tank, and as soon as I moved her to a 26 with five other glofish tetras she perked up and became WAY more active. I promise your betta will get nipped if they don't get a proper school. Plus, your water parameters will be hard to maintain with such a small tank leading to disease.

    My recommendation? Rehome the glofish and upgrade the bettas tank.
     
  9. tunafax

    tunafax Well Known Member Member

    With betta murder, everything looks just fine until one day you find a dead tetra and wonder what went wrong. That is exactly what went wrong, and it's not a question of 'if' - it's a question of 'when' your betta snaps.

    Tetras are not compatible with bettas, tetras need schools, bigger tanks, and cooler temperatures. Bettas need to be kept away from other fish when it comes to a tank this size. If you are looking for a bigger tank, you should use it separate, not upgrade.


    @penguin02 that is likely a 5 gallon, but it could be a 2.5g if the heater is up to scale. It's fine for just the betta.
     
  10. FishFish221

    FishFish221 Well Known Member Member

    The title said its a 5 gallon.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Sorcha Renee

    Sorcha Renee New Member Member

    Seriously, they don't seem to bother each other.
    The Betta hangs out in his space and the glofish in theirs. They swim together at times and are ok. I will keep watching to assure this harmony continues.. thank you for your tips. But, every fish is different and they haven't had a problem yet! My Betta is a VERY calm fish and usually hangs out in the yellow decoration. This is NOT different from before I introduced the new fish!
    I keep a close eye on the Betta and his fins look the same still!


    So... back to my original question on the moss balls ?
     
  12. m

    minervalong Well Known Member Member

    Moss balls are fine, just a specialized form of a moss.
     
  13. Lisa410

    Lisa410 New Member Member

    I have a few moss balls in with my 1 male Betta and 1 amano shrimp. The shrimp seems to like the moss ball, but I have never seen the betta near it.
     
  14. pixelhoot

    pixelhoot Valued Member Member

    Marimos are a type of algae that originate in Japan from the currents rolling algae along. They are beneficial in the way a regular aquarium plant is in the fact that they take nutrients from the tank and filter the water a little bit. They also put oxygen into the water for the fish. They mechanically catch food and detritus in the water, so shrimp love to crawl over them and scavenge morsels. They are easy to clean as you just squeeze them and rub the surface gently in a bowl of conditioned water. Rolling them from time to time allows them to maintain their ball shape better.
    If you're up for upgrading, you have my service and advice. ♥
     
  15. Caitlin86

    Caitlin86 Well Known Member Member

    Moss balls are actually algae.
     
  16. Latias

    Latias New Member Member

    I disagree, I've been told recently that ten gallon with a plant or two is best. It'd be the best for the Betta. Also OP needs to rehome those other fish because they will all get very stressed living together like that. Hope that helps.
     
  17. Caitlin86

    Caitlin86 Well Known Member Member

    Unfortunately fish exhibit stress differently than us humans. You may not think your fish r stressed when in all reality they most likely are. Fish may have different personalities but in terms of care your tank mates need different temps and like mentioned b4 tetras r schooling fish. Your fish may be surviving but until u provide them with the necessary care they may not thrive.
     
  18. bopsalot

    bopsalot Well Known Member Member

    Actually, it looks like you agree. And that is good. 5 or 10 gallons is great for a betta. 10 is better. I know the OP doesn't want to hear it, but I wholeheartedly agree with what has been expressed earlier. Just to reiterate, not to gang up (I just want you to succeed):

    Bettas are solitary creatures. They do not appreciate tank mates of any kind. In a perfect set up (20+ gallons, 80 degrees, gentle current, lots of cover) some bettas may tolerate a community.

    In a 5 gallon tank, no way.

    Despite what the Glofish website claims, those are black skirt tetra, and will not thrive at 80 degrees, which is outside their natural range. Even if you compromise and set the temp at 76-77, it won't be enough. Both fish will be stressed.

    Skirt tetras need a group of 6 minimum. 10+ is better. They also require a much larger tank. Otherwise, stress, fin-nipping, disease, etc... you may or may not be able to observe the stress, but it will be there.

    Sorry, I know it's bad news. And nobody likes getting bad news. There is so much sketchy information on the web, it takes experience just to do good research. I'm glad you posted here, fishlore is a great place to learn, and most everyone is friendly and helpful. The good advice and sound practices are found here. We will help you get the tank that you are looking for. But those tetras are not going to work in there. Good luck!
     
  19. m

    minervalong Well Known Member Member

    Thanks for the correction.
     
  20. Ken Ooi

    Ken Ooi Valued Member Member

    I hope a bigger tank for your tetras and the existing tank for your Betta will create harmony for your fish and your forum members. Good luck with the upgrade. We are all here supporting you with the right advice and in the right direction
     




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