Betta fish with ghost shrimp

JasperWard

Hi everyone,
I currently have a 5 gallon planted tank with a 3.5 year old female betta Cinnamon. The plant life includes anubias nana petite (2). anubias barteri (1), Bacopa carolinia (2 bunches), Water sprite (2 bunches), 6-8 oz of java moss, some floating salvina, rosette sword (2), Java fern (1), marimo moss ball (3), and some dwarf hairgrass. I have good cover with dragon okho, slate, manzanita branches and dried Indian almond leaves. Would this be sufficent for 3-4 ghost shrimp with by betta, she has poor eye sight and can not hunt, I am more worried about the shrimp being aggresive. I am unsure since I have heard the stories if aggresive ghost shrimp, no not macro shrimp, ghost shrimp.
Water parameters:
Kh:7
Gh:4
Ph:6.8
Ammonia:0
Nitrite:0
Nitrate:0
Temp:78
 

bumblinBee

Nope, never experienced aggressive ghost shrimp. I think they're one of the better shrimp options to pair with bettas actually. Five gallons is a little small for ghost shrimp, but I think it'll be fine to keep a few.
 
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JasperWard

Nope, never experienced aggressive ghost shrimp. I think they're one of the better shrimp options to pair with bettas actually. Five gallons is a little small for ghost shrimp, but I think it'll be fine to keep a few.
Thank you for the response,
I am completely open to sugeestions i was thinking of neocaridina davidi but was worried the water might be too soft, if i got them i would only get females as i do not want breeding occuring. If you have suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.
 
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bumblinBee

Thank you for the response,
I am completely open to sugeestions i was thinking of neocaridina davidi but was worried the water might be too soft, if i got them i would only get females as i do not want breeding occuring. If you have suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.
I mean tbh cherry shrimp have been bred in such a wide range of conditions that they'll probably be alright in anything above 6.5, as long as you don't purchase wild caught lol.. obviously make sure they've got access to a calcium source but people have certainly managed it. Keeping one sex would be a good idea to avoid breeding for sure. You could get 5-6 cherry shrimp or stick with 3 or so ghost shrimp, honestly either would work.
 
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JasperWard

Alright i think i will go with some cherry shrimp as i could probably have more action in my tank with 5 of them. Do you have any calcium sources you would reconmmend?
 
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JLAquatics

In most cases it can work out just fine if you have a more tame Betta, but there are a few tricks to increase chances of success with cohabitation.

1. Have Dense plant cover. Shrimp love densely planted tanks. Not only does it create sight barriers, but it can encourage shrimp to forage out in the open more knowing they have places to go after molting when they are extremely vulnerable to attacks. Ghost Shrimp and Amano are non aggressive if they have ample food sources (Cherry Shrimp are not aggressive at all). Having live plants to graze on will help mitigate undesired behavior.

2. Get a large enough group of shrimp from the start. This will decrease the chances of a single shrimp getting singled out, which can be detrimental to their health. Shrimp have very small bioloads. You can put many more shrimp in a tank than fish and still have great water parameters. I am thinking a group of 3-5 Ghost Shrimp/ Amano Shrimp in a 5 gallon tank at least or 6-8 Neocardinia shrimp only if you are confident the Betta won't attack them, so try to avoid getting just one or two to start. However, if going the Neocardinia Shrimp, keeping just the more vibrant females may be the most viable option in such a small tank. However, if getting both genders, your Betta may get some free food with the baby shrimp that will inevitably be produced if they are healthy.

3. Have another tank on hand. This will ensure that in case anything goes south, you will have a backup plan so that your shrimp are not killed by the Betta in question.

4. If you are unsure how your Betta will behave, trying feeder shrimp (Ghost Shrimp) first to see how the Betta will interact with them before going to the more expensive ornamental shrimp such as Amanos or Cherries.

As I mentioned above, you should be more concerned about the Betta going after the Shrimp, true Ghost Shrimp, Amano Shrimp, and Neocardinia shrimp are all extremely peaceful inverts and will not attack the Betta. However, many people report Grass Shrimp (confused often with ghost shrimp) attacking fish larger than them.
 
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bumblinBee

Alright i think i will go with some cherry shrimp as i could probably have more action in my tank with 5 of them. Do you have any calcium sources you would reconmmend?
Cuttlebone is a really good option. You can stick it right in the tank and over time it will disolve calcium into the water, it also gives the shrimp the option to pick at it if they feel they need to. Also special foods designed for shrimp/lobsters/crabs etc. that are high in calcium are good options.
 
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JLAquatics

Cuttlebone is a really good option. You can stick it right in the tank and over time it will disolve calcium into the water, it also gives the shrimp the option to pick at it if they feel they need to. Also special foods designed for shrimp/lobsters/crabs etc. that are high in calcium are good options.
Seachem Equilibirum also works for raising GH well, I add it to all my tanks with inverts. A GH of 4 will be too low in the long run for most Shrimp in the Neocardinia family (causes molting issues), so adding Seachem Equilibrium or what bumblinBee suggested will definitely help the shrimp thrive.
 
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bumblinBee

Seachem Equilibirum also works for raising GH well, I add it to all my tanks with inverts. A GH of 4 will be too low in the long run for most Shrimp in the Neocardinia family (causes molting issues), so adding Seachem Equilibrium or what bumblinBee suggested will definitely help the shrimp thrive.
I am fortunate that my parameters are in a very safe range for most shrimp, so I've never had to worry about adjusting. Definitely worth looking into, thank you for the addition!
 
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JasperWard

In most cases it can work out just fine if you have a more tame Betta, but there are a few tricks to increase chances of success with cohabitation.

1. Have Dense plant cover. Shrimp love densely planted tanks. Not only does it create sight barriers, but it can encourage shrimp to forage out in the open more knowing they have places to go after molting when they are extremely vulnerable to attacks. Ghost Shrimp and Amano are non aggressive if they have ample food sources (Cherry Shrimp are not aggressive at all). Having live plants to graze on will help mitigate undesired behavior.

2. Get a large enough group of shrimp from the start. This will decrease the chances of a single shrimp getting singled out, which can be detrimental to their health. Shrimp have very small bioloads. You can put many more shrimp in a tank than fish and still have great water parameters. I am thinking a group of 3-5 Ghost Shrimp/ Amano Shrimp in a 5 gallon tank at least or 6-8 Neocardinia shrimp only if you are confident the Betta won't attack them, so try to avoid getting just one or two to start. However, if going the Neocardinia Shrimp, keeping just the more vibrant females may be the most viable option in such a small tank. However, if getting both genders, your Betta may get some free food with the baby shrimp that will inevitably be produced if they are healthy.

3. Have another tank on hand. This will ensure that in case anything goes south, you will have a backup plan so that your shrimp are not killed by the Betta in question.

4. If you are unsure how your Betta will behave, trying feeder shrimp (Ghost Shrimp) first to see how the Betta will interact with them before going to the more expensive ornamental shrimp such as Amanos or Cherries.

As I mentioned above, you should be more concerned about the Betta going after the Shrimp, true Ghost Shrimp, Amano Shrimp, and Neocardinia shrimp are all extremely peaceful inverts and will not attack the Betta. However, many people report Grass Shrimp (confused often with ghost shrimp) attacking fish larger than them.
Alright thank you i will probably get some cherry shrimp, female, and see how it go’s. I would not want breeding pairs because my fish can barely see so she would not be able to control the population. I have a 3 gallon tank that i could use hut it is minimally planted. Just one thinf. if it does work out with the ghost shrimp that i put in to test what do you recommend i do with them, could they just stay in the tank?
Cuttlebone is a really good option. You can stick it right in the tank and over time it will disolve calcium into the water, it also gives the shrimp the option to pick at it if they feel they need to. Also special foods designed for shrimp/lobsters/crabs etc. that are high in calcium are good options.
Alright i will probably get some female cherry shrimp like 6-8 and i will look into cuttlebone, thank you for the help
Seachem Equilibirum also works for raising GH well, I add it to all my tanks with inverts. A GH of 4 will be too low in the long run for most Shrimp in the Neocardinia family (causes molting issues), so adding Seachem Equilibrium or what bumblinBee suggested will definitely help the shrimp thrive.
Will look into it
In most cases it can work out just fine if you have a more tame Betta, but there are a few tricks to increase chances of success with cohabitation.

1. Have Dense plant cover. Shrimp love densely planted tanks. Not only does it create sight barriers, but it can encourage shrimp to forage out in the open more knowing they have places to go after molting when they are extremely vulnerable to attacks. Ghost Shrimp and Amano are non aggressive if they have ample food sources (Cherry Shrimp are not aggressive at all). Having live plants to graze on will help mitigate undesired behavior.

2. Get a large enough group of shrimp from the start. This will decrease the chances of a single shrimp getting singled out, which can be detrimental to their health. Shrimp have very small bioloads. You can put many more shrimp in a tank than fish and still have great water parameters. I am thinking a group of 3-5 Ghost Shrimp/ Amano Shrimp in a 5 gallon tank at least or 6-8 Neocardinia shrimp only if you are confident the Betta won't attack them, so try to avoid getting just one or two to start. However, if going the Neocardinia Shrimp, keeping just the more vibrant females may be the most viable option in such a small tank. However, if getting both genders, your Betta may get some free food with the baby shrimp that will inevitably be produced if they are healthy.

3. Have another tank on hand. This will ensure that in case anything goes south, you will have a backup plan so that your shrimp are not killed by the Betta in question.

4. If you are unsure how your Betta will behave, trying feeder shrimp (Ghost Shrimp) first to see how the Betta will interact with them before going to the more expensive ornamental shrimp such as Amanos or Cherries.

As I mentioned above, you should be more concerned about the Betta going after the Shrimp, true Ghost Shrimp, Amano Shrimp, and Neocardinia shrimp are all extremely peaceful inverts and will not attack the Betta. However, many people report Grass Shrimp (confused often with ghost shrimp) attacking fish larger than them.
Also here is a picture of my tank right now, I am currently quarentinging some java moss and anubias barteri but this is everything else, it still needs some work
Seachem Equilibirum also works for raising GH well, I add it to all my tanks with inverts. A GH of 4 will be too low in the long run for most Shrimp in the Neocardinia family (causes molting issues), so adding Seachem Equilibrium or what bumblinBee suggested will definitely help the shrimp thrive.
What gh should i try to raise it too?
 

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JLAquatics

Alright thank you i will probably get some cherry shrimp, female, and see how it go’s. I would not want breeding pairs because my fish can barely see so she would not be able to control the population. I have a 3 gallon tank that i could use hut it is minimally planted. Just one thinf. if it does work out with the ghost shrimp that i put in to test what do you recommend i do with them, could they just stay in the tank?

What gh should i try to raise it too?
A gh of 6-8 should be sufficient for the shrimp you plan on getting.
As for the ghost shrimp, if they don't work out they could go in the 3 gallon and be just fine.
 
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JasperWard

A gh of 6-8 should be sufficient for the shrimp you plan on getting.
As for the ghost shrimp, if they don't work out they could go in the 3 gallon and be just fine.
Is a gh of 6-8 ok for a betta? Could i keep the ghost shrimp with the cherries in the tank?
 
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JLAquatics

Is a gh of 6-8 ok for a betta?
Yes, the Betta should do fine in gh 6-8 waters. Even considering the full scale, a GH of six is still classified as relatively soft water. A GH lower than 6 is what you want to avoid for neo shrimp and most snails. I have a 29 gallon aquascape with Lambchop Rasboras and Neon Tetras (both classified as softwater fish) dosed with Equilibrium to 6-7 and they do very well with the shrimp.
 
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JasperWard

Yes, the Betta should do fine in gh 6-8 waters. Even considering the full scale, a GH of six is still classified as relatively soft water. A GH lower than 6 is what you want to avoid for neo shrimp and most snails. I have a 29 gallon aquascape with Lambchop Rasboras and Neon Tetras (both classified as softwater fish) dosed with Equilibrium to 6-7 and they do very well with the shrimp.
Alright i will get some equilibrium, one last thing, if the ghost shrimp do workput could i keep them in the tank along with the cherry shrimp?
 
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JLAquatics

Alright i will get some equilibrium, one last thing, if the ghost shrimp do workput could i keep them in the tank along with the cherry shrimp?
Yes they can live together in the same tank, but just be careful not to over stock the tank. It may be better to get up to 2 ghost shrimp for a test and then get up to 5 cherry shrimp if things work out.
 
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JasperWard

Yes they can live together in the same tank, but just be careful not to over stock the tank. It may be better to get up to 2 ghost shrimp for a test and then get up to 5 cherry shrimp if things work out.
Alright i am going to go to my LFS and get some ghost shrimp plus equilibrium i will keep you posted
 
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bumblinBee

Alright i am going to go to my LFS and get some ghost shrimp plus equilibrium i will keep you posted
I hope it all works out well, I'd love to see some photos once they're in the tank!
 
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