Betta Breeding Questions

JoshM
  • #41
Male sure you have a 10 gallon and 1 healthy male and 1 healthy female.
 
Darren hickman
  • #42
now is it ok
 
LyndaB
  • #43
Well, your information is there, but you indicate you do not know about the nitrogen cycle. Please read up on it. Without having this information under your belt, your fish will be in toxic water conditions. You will require cycled tanks in order to attempt betta breeding.

What do you use your all-in-one for treating? Also, which dechlorinator do you have? What is the banana leaf used for, I'm not familiar with that. What other fish do you currently have and in what size tank?

Do you have a test kit? We recommend the API master kit.

Johnsfish, there's SO much more involved in breeding bettas. You need to condition the fish prior to spawning, you need to have the proper equipment (separate tanks) to keep the male and female separated until they are ready to spawn. You need to have appropriate food for the fry. You need to have grow out tanks/containers for the fry. And even more. It's not something to take lightly.
 
tress29
  • #44
Johnsfish, there's SO much more involved in breeding bettas. You need to condition the fish prior to spawning, you need to have the proper equipment (separate tanks) to keep the male and female separated until they are ready to spawn. You need to have appropriate food for the fry. You need to have grow out tanks/containers for the fry. And even more. It's not something to take lightly.

It's definitely not as simple as breeding live bearers.
 
animallover1
  • #45
Any tips and suggestions for breeding my veintails?
betta 2

And Crowntails?
 
Vasalissa
  • #47
HI Animal Lover Hopefully considering you are wanting to breed bettas you have read a great variety of sources about it Both on this forum and off of the forum.

https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfi...t-to-breed-bettas-responsible-breeding.89909/
https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfishforum/threads/step-by-step-guide-to-breeding-bettas.37434/
These are good if you haven't already I recommend reading these... And then possibly REreading them.

Another thing you will need is A LOT of room, for lots of little tanks for the males when they get aggressive at about 5-12 weeks. You will need a breeding tank, Seperate tanks for mummy and daddy once they are finished doing the deed. You will need a grow out tank ready for up to and including 200+ babies, and a good place to sell the fish once you are finished.

Also I might add that there isn't much of a personal market for Veil tail betta's Crowntails are a little better but not by much, unless you plan on selling them to a pet shop for under $1 you may have a lot of trouble selling them. If you are wanting to make a profit off of this I recommended finding something else to breed as it is difficult to get much of a good profit from breeding bettas. Especially veil tails.


Anyway what I do:

I condition the pair. Put them in tanks by themselves and feed them high fibre high protein food. Brine shrimp, frozen brineshrimp frozen blood worm etc! I give them new water every 2 days and I let them see each other for 2 hours at a time. Hopefully your female will get really really fat! This means she is full of eggs and ready. If she is not fat and doesn't look to have eggs in her, you are wasting your time and they will get very very hurt just constantly attacking each other!!!!

The breeding tank is 20L and is set up with 2" (4-5cm) of water in it heated to 27-28 degrees celcius. Lots of plants and places to hide as well as a floating almond leaf to assist the male in breeding a nest. I have a "chimney" for the female which is essentially a soft drink bottle chopped in half and inserted into the water with the female inside. This is so the male can see her get all excited about her but can't actually get at her to hurt her. Then I leave them alone leaving the light on for a little while then turning it off. Hopefully the next day you come back and hopefully he has built a solid decent bubble nest. If not give them another day. (There is the possibility that he still doesn't build one and nothing happens if this is the case separate them and repeat the conditioning process)
When his bubble nest is good and she is fat. leaving the light on let her out. WATCH THEM. He will attack her and she will probably attack him back. They may fight and get beaten up! (some are docile and just do the deed and get over it. Others will not) If at any time ANY TIME you think one or the other is in danger of his/her life TAKE THEM OUT!!!!!!!!!!!
After a while (1hr-48hrs) he will embrace her, and la la la (hopefully you know this part otherwise you really shouldn't be breeding anything)

After the mating is complete take mumma out and put her in her own tank, maybe add some salt and keep an eye on her as she can get fin rot and other things from the stress of it all.
Let daddy take care of the eggs (he may eat them. If this happens repeat the above steps eventually he will be a good dad!) Once the eggs are hatched and free swimming take the male out also and give him his own tank and bring him back to full health.

The babies will need Baby Brineshrimp (you will need a hatchery) and Microworms (you will need to start a culture) and some powdered food. I do BBS Microworms and Vinegar eels as well as having micropellets and First Bite on hand. Feed 3-4 times a day!
After 2 weeks or so they will be put in the growout tank which hopefully you have fully cycled and have some plants in there ready for them. Continue feeding but eventually you will only need to feed them every day or twice a day.

Once they get old enough to be sexed (flaring and attacking will occur generally in males before females) they will need to be seperated and here is where you will need ALOT of space! As they will each need little tanks 2 Gallons or up.

Hopefully I haven't missed anything. If you have any questions let me know!!!
 
animallover1
  • #48
Thanks I am at the stage where I have the female in the bottle after conditioning by:
Putting them in separate tanks opening a flap so they could she eachother flaring them once or twice a day
After my male built his bubble nest I realized he was ready so I put him in the 20 gallon with a fake plant and hiding spots and kept feeding him frozen brine shrimp
I recently stopped and started to feed him bloodworms (his regular diet) because he started to get fat
My female started to show her egg spot 2 days ago so I put her under the bottle so the male could see her
hoping that SushI (My male) Would build his nest because he saw Emma (My female)
Am I doing this right or....
THANKS!
 
Vasalissa
  • #49
You seem to be doing fine at the moment.

Do you have something to feed the babies? Frozen Brine and Blood worm is too big for the baby mouths?
 
animallover1
  • #50
The lady told me to crunch up freeze dried bloodworms as I don't want to breed brine shrimp or microworms
Do you have any suggestions?
 
animallover1
  • #51
I am willing to but none of the stores were I live have the eggs!
 
animallover1
  • #52
hI animal lover hopefully considering you are wanting to breed bettas you have read a great variety of sources about it both on this forum and off of the forum.

https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfi...t-to-breed-bettas-responsible-breeding.89909/
https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfishforum/threads/step-by-step-guide-to-breeding-bettas.37434/
these are good if you haven't already I recommend reading these... And then possibly rereading them.

Another thing you will need is a lot of room, for lots of little tanks for the males when they get aggressive at about 5-12 weeks. You will need a breeding tank, separate tanks for mummy and daddy once they are finished doing the deed. You will need a grow out tank ready for up to and including 200+ babies, and a good place to sell the fish once you are finished.

Also I might add that there isn't much of a personal market for veil tail betta's crowntails are a little better but not by much, unless you plan on selling them to a pet shop for under $1 you may have a lot of trouble selling them. If you are wanting to make a profit off of this I recommended finding something else to breed as it is difficult to get much of a good profit from breeding bettas. Especially veil tails.


Anyway what I do:

I condition the pair. Put them in tanks by themselves and feed them high fibre high protein food. Brine shrimp, frozen brineshrimp frozen blood worm etc! I give them new water every 2 days and I let them see each other for 2 hours at a time. Hopefully your female will get really really fat! This means she is full of eggs and ready. If she is not fat and doesn't look to have eggs in her, you are wasting your time and they will get very very hurt just constantly attacking each other!!!!

The breeding tank is 20l and is set up with 2" (4-5cm) of water in it heated to 27-28 degrees celcius. Lots of plants and places to hide as well as a floating almond leaf to assist the male in breeding a nest. I have a "chimney" for the female which is essentially a soft drink bottle chopped in half and inserted into the water with the female inside. This is so the male can see her get all excited about her but can't actually get at her to hurt her. Then I leave them alone leaving the light on for a little while then turning it off. Hopefully the next day you come back and hopefully he has built a solid decent bubble nest. If not give them another day. (there is the possibility that he still doesn't build one and nothing happens if this is the case separate them and repeat the conditioning process)
when his bubble nest is good and she is fat. Leaving the light on let her out. Watch them. He will attack her and she will probably attack him back. They may fight and get beaten up! (some are docile and just do the deed and get over it. Others will not) if at any time any time you think one or the other is in danger of his/her life take them out!!!!!!!!!!!
After a while (1hr-48hrs) he will embrace her, and la la la (hopefully you know this part otherwise you really shouldn't be breeding anything)

after the mating is complete take mumma out and put her in her own tank, maybe add some salt and keep an eye on her as she can get fin rot and other things from the stress of it all.
Let daddy take care of the eggs (he may eat them. If this happens repeat the above steps eventually he will be a good dad!) once the eggs are hatched and free swimming take the male out also and give him his own tank and bring him back to full health.

The babies will need baby brineshrimp (you will need a hatchery) and microworms (you will need to start a culture) and some powdered food. I do bbs microworms and vinegar eels as well as having micropellets and first bite on hand. Feed 3-4 times a day!
After 2 weeks or so they will be put in the growout tank which hopefully you have fully cycled and have some plants in there ready for them. Continue feeding but eventually you will only need to feed them every day or twice a day.

Once they get old enough to be sexed (flaring and attacking will occur generally in males before females) they will need to be seperated and here is where you will need a lot of space! As they will each need little tanks 2 gallons or up.

Hopefully I haven't missed anything. If you have any questions let me know!!!


thanks for the info!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I really used it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Vasalissa
  • #53
Oh Um you can get microworm cultures online from multiple sources same with the BBS eggs. Microworms are EASY AS PIE I have a lot of them and I sell them to people, unfortunately I can't send them to America...

Brine shrimp is pretty easy also.
That is a link for a simple effective way to set up brine, I do it that way?

Your welcome!
 
animallover1
  • #54
Can You sell them to people in Canada? It would even be easy if we could do the eggs!
 
Vasalissa
  • #55
I can't send them over seas due to laws and regulations. I'm afraid but there are a lot of people over in America and probably Canada who do microworms and brine shrimp eggs. As I kept coming across them when looking in Australia
 
animallover1
  • #56
Oh Um you can get microworm cultures online from multiple sources same with the BBS eggs. Microworms are EASY AS PIE I have a lot of them and I sell them to people, unfortunately I can't send them to America...

Brine shrimp is pretty easy also.
That is a link for a simple effective way to set up brine, I do it that way?

Your welcome!

Do you perfer Brine Shrimp or micro Worms?
 
Vasalissa
  • #57
I prefer both as I microworms are good up until a certain age then brine shrimp is best
 
RingneckParrot
  • #58
HI everyone sorry if this thread is in the wrong place I just couldn't find the 'breeding section' :\ Anyway, I need a little information on how to breed bettas. I've already researched the topic a lot and now I have finally bought my pair. They might not be the show breeding stock (I don't really mind, just for fun ) but I bought them from my LFS. A male red crowntail with bluey/turquoise points and a wild looking female with a blue sheen over her scales. I keep the male in a 30cm long tank by about 10cm wide and 10cm high. He has 1mm gravel substrate of about 1 1/2 cm. He has 2 soft silk plants to hide in and rest on and he has built a 7cm+ long bubble nest. He does not have a heater at the moment (not sure if one can go in that size of a tank :\ ) and does not have a filter though I do 20% water changes about once a week. He seems very happy and lively and at the moment and I feed him 2 pellets a day. Today I bought him a female and at the moment she is in a breeding trap in my betta's tank. He is putting on a good show and my female has shown vertical strips and I can see her egg tube. My betta is building his bubble nest up now that the female is in the tank. I am planning on releasing her next weekend so I can check on them and so they can get used to each other. Have I done anything wrong at this point, do I need a heater? And if so where can I get them? I have got a spare tank to put the female and male in when they have finished breeding. Any tips or info I may need??? Thanks I really appreciate your help.
 
Aquarist
  • #59
Check out the information in the gray areas.



Good morning,

The links above will give you some tips. Too, I have moved your thread to Breeding Fish section of the forum.

Thanks! Best of luck!

Ken
 
junebug
  • #60
Ken, you ninja me

Martinismommy's thread is great info on betta breeding.

I will say, after reading your entire post, that you can't put the male and female together after they breed. First off, the male will need to stay with his nest. Secondly, both of them are going to be extremely weak and injured after they breed. And thirdly, most of the time if you have a male betta in with a female betta (and they're not breeding) he'll kill her.

You're also going to need a bigger tank, I think, to breed them in. 1 gallon (your approximate tank size) is nowhere near big enough if you want either fish to survive the breeding process.

Actually, I think that tank size is less than 1 gallon... but I'm not that great with conversions.
 
RingneckParrot
  • #61
Ok thanks for your help, I really appreciate it. I am not putting the male and female together after they've bred - i'm either gonna put the male in a breeder trap in my big tank or vice versa. I may even buy another small tank to house him in temporarily until the fry grow up and I can put him back in his original tank. Just a quick question though, do the males spawn the eggs AFTER he places them in the nest or does he spawn them whilst he wraps himself around the female? Btw, both bettas flare at each other quite frequently and my male even tries to attack the breeder trap. My female also is blowing bubbles - they are not all frothy like the male's just scattered bubbles at the top. Also just another couple of questions - can I release the female into the tank after a day of being in the breeder trap or will I have to wait for a week? And last question - are you able to buy commercial fry food or do you have to feed them on bbs (baby brine shrimp) and micro-worms? Thanks really appreciate your help
 
Gordinian
  • #62
It looks like your tank is approximately .8 gallons. IMO, this is far too small to attempt breeding in.

If I read your post correctly, after breeding you plan on keeping one betta in the .8 gallon and the other in a breeders net in a larger tank? Personally, I think that if you aren't able to provide each betta with a 5+ gallon tank with filter and heater, you shouldn't be breeding. What do you plan to do with all the babies once they get larger and each need an individual tank?

Also, if your female is flaring and blowing bubbles, there's a good possibility that it's actually a male plakat. Double check to make sure that it's actually a female- sometimes the labels on LFSs cups are wrong. Males will have a black "beard" when they flare.
 
Vasalissa
  • #63
Females do flare and can blow bubbles also, One of my females blew bubbles inside the chimney I had her in to stop the male attacking her.

However I agree that if you do not have proper space for the babies, especially the males who will need to be separated from everyone else due to aggression etc.
 
junebug
  • #64
My females flare at each other often enough. Not violent, as they grew up together, but a "you're too close back off right now" kind of flare. They both also blow bubbles.

IMO, if you're going to breed bettas, you need at least a 20 gallon fry tank, and the ability to separate the males into their own space once they start to show aggression. Which, sadly, is why I don't breed, even though I'd like to.

If you turn your female loose in a tank that small, the male is going to kill her. She won't be able to get away from him when he gets too rough.
 
RingneckParrot
  • #65
Don't worry, my Dad has agreed to transform our big 4 foot fish tank into a breeding tank for the bettas. Meanwhile i'm gonna put my female back in my 2 foot tank so she can get some rest and so both of them can calm down and relax for awhile. The tank hasn't been used in years (bought it off eBay ages ago) so it will need a new filter and possibly some other gear. I don't think I'll use gravel whilst they are spawning so the male can find the eggs and fry but I will use a heater and a filtration unit of some sort that won't disturb the bubble nest, eggs, or fry. The tank will also be able to provide the fry enough space to grow for a bit which is good. After breeding bettas, I will probably turn the tank into a community tank of some sort so that it is put into good use. I can't wait!
 
Boowiggles
  • #66
Thanks for all the info I already tried once with my bettas but they tore chunks off each other (wasn't all that bad) so I separated them and there fins are healing well but I'm worried because my male has began to show pink on previously healthy fins and in the pink areas the fin is fraying and I'm trying to help him by cleaning the tank and adding a tad of salt but still worried like crazy and the female got more fin damage during the breeding atempt then he did and her fin is growing back so quickly it's almost scary so if u have any tips on what to do that would help a ton and I wish you the best of breeding and health for your little babies (all your betta)
 
Vasalissa
  • #67
Your male may be getting fin rot which is really common when there has been damage to the fins!

I use salt and clean water to deal with fin rot! I add 1 Teaspoon for every 5L (Bettas can deal with a great deal of salt) and then change the water every 2-3 days watching carefully.
Your female sounds like mine where she healed within a few days which is great but my male was very torn and has taken AGES recovering!
 
Crucio
  • #68
I've currently gotten a new betta, a crowntail male, and I'm becoming more and more interested in breeding. I'm not certain I'll be breeding him, he's young and I've got a bit to decide and get ready, but I want to know as much as all of you can tell me. Everything and anything I could ever need to know, any and all opinions and suggestions. Witchy is helping and answering tons of questions and I'm trying to read everything I find on the subject online, but I'd like to branch out and ask anyone who might know.
 
Anders247
  • #69
junebug can help you.
 
junebug
  • #70
If you got your CT boy from a petstore, he's not young. In fact he's almost certainly too old to breed.

The basics of breeding are a young starting pair, a 5 gallon(ish) spawn tank, a 20-30 gallon growout tank, a ton of plants, and enough small live foods for the babies to eat. Joining the IBC or a similar organization is a good start, and some of the members of these organizations donate breeding pairs to new breeders.
 
Crucio
  • #71
I understand that most pet stores sell bettas that are far to old to breed, but from what I've seen as far as adult crowntails go, hes either only a few months or a very small adult. What kind of live foods would you suggest? I've read about some breeders using brine shrimp, microworms, and daphnia. But I've also read that brine shrimp can cause problems with the swim bladder.
 
junebug
  • #72
Brine shrimp eggs cause problems (some always get in the water with the BBS when you pull them into the growout). Microworms and vinegar eels cause missing ventrals, and too much daphnia I've heard can cause spinal deformities.

What you want, ultimately, is a mix of everything. Some worms, some crustaceans. I would personally start infusoria cultures and add them to the main tank, and seed the grow out with blackworms, scuds, daphnia, and any other little critters, then start mixing in prepared foods when the babies were big enough. I've never been very good at maintaining live food cultures outside the main tank, though.

I forgot to mention, you'll also need separate grow outs for about 100 babies. all of the males, at some point, will need to be pulled from the big grow out tank. The girls can remain in it, though.
 
Crucio
  • #73
Okay, that's really helpful! Can the father betta be left in the tank with the fry for very long, or should he be removed after they're free swimming?
 
Witchydesign
  • #74
Ya june hes a youngen. Our store sells them about 3-5 months old. Both walmart and petsmart. Its kind of odd but ill go with it lol.
 
junebug
  • #75
Okay, that's really helpful! Can the father betta be left in the tank with the fry for very long, or should he be removed after they're free swimming?

That depends on the individual male. If he's not going after the fry, he can stay in with them for a few days. More often than not, though, the male needs to be removed, because he'll eat the fry after they start moving around and he's not required to tend them anymore.
 
Crucio
  • #76
I'd read that you could leave the male in for 2-3 months, but others had advised that he be removed immediately. I've noticed Maroxy apparently being used during betta breeding, and a few have mentioned a fungus stop type medication. What else should be used and what is a fungus stop?
 
junebug
  • #77
I have no idea where you read any of that. I don't know any breeders who leave the parent male in that long with the fry (they start eating the babies after a few days) and I've never heard of anyone, ever, dosing their breeding tanks with medication.

The bubblenest, and the papa betta, are all you need to get the eggs to hatch, assuming your water quality is in order. The male's nest tending will prevent fungus, and if you start dosing the tank with meds before the fry even hatch, you could be affecting their development. Not to mention, you'd be creating superbugs that could end up affecting them later on, assuming they even hatched after being dosed with meds.

The only time I would use any sort of medication in breeding is if I had to artificially hatch the fry. This can sometimes happen with males that are egg eaters (bettas are overbred, hence some of them are just plain nutzo). Often if a breeder sees a male chowing down on his eggs, they'll remove the entire nest to a shallow bowl or petrie dish and keep it in methylene blue to prevent fungus. I want to stress, they are *only* doing this because the nest and eggs are not being tended by the male.
 
Wendigoblue
  • #78
I've heard of dosing the spawn tank with methylene blue or another antI fungal. I actually have methylene blue just for that purpose, but I won't use them now. I'm glad I read your post junebug before I actually got eggs! I found a website where the breeder kept the male with the eggs until they were sold. I wound't do it, but I'll find the website later!
 
junebug
  • #79
^ That just sounds insane to me LOL. I mean meth. blue is one thing, I get why people would use it in nesting tanks, especially with a male who is a poor caregiver. But the way it works is pretty non-invasive, it mostly just oxygenates. It's not very harsh at all.

I personally wouldn't use it unless I spotted fungus. Then again I use planted tanks for my fish, even for spawning, so I probably would avoid it at all costs. Most males will eat fungal eggs before they can affect the rest of the nest. But ammonia from dying plants will certainly kill all of the eggs
 
Wendigoblue
  • #80
Here's the website with a bunch of different ways people breed bettas.
 

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