Betta acting weird - At a loss

Motherlovebetta

Any ideas why my betta is acting so weird? Tank has been up since may but had him since March. He’s a male crow tail if that makes any difference. Roughly a week ago he ripped off two of his dorsal fins. I got him some shrimp and did the mirror thing maybe a minute a day and he stopped. Last night after he ate I noticed he was laying on the bottom of the tank a lot and seemed to be breathing kind of heavy I checked him this morning and thought he was dead but he was just laying there. He will have short (a few seconds) periods where he will swim around quickly then right back to the bottom of the His color is normal there is no fin rot or anything weird, ph 7.6 ammonia 0 nitrites 0 nitrates 10. Have not fed him today but he’s been eating normally. No new foods or plants in his tank. He has doubled in size since I got him so I’m assuming he isn’t that old. I know he could be resting on the bottom, but this is just very strange for him and I have a bad feeling. Am I missing anything?
Just an edit the tank has two filters a sponge filter and an internal filter that is built into it but hardly any flow and is heated to 82F has a light which I have dimmed currently.
 

Ouse

Longfin betta varieties have trouble swimming even without torn fins and take naps on the substrate from time to time. Swimming with long, trailing fins is tiring, especially for crowntails. I think what you’re describing is to be expected from the species.

Betta splendens lives for a couple to a few years.

82°F (nearly 28°C) is too warm for bettas, so try cranking the temp down to 76°F. Fin rot causing bacteria gain resistance in higher temperatures.
 
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CaptainSupport

My buddy had a betta that did the same thing, but he was confined to a 1.5 gallon tank, which was pretty bad. I think the betta was depressed honestly. He had it for 3 years though.
As Ouse said, bettas do rest on the substrate. Perhaps he is focusing on healing.
I would watch for fin tumors, as well.
 
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JavaMossMan

I'm not an expert on bettas but isn't 7.6 pH too high for bettas? I remember reading somewhere that they will not do well in the long run in high pH as they are a soft water fish.
 
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grac3

Sounds like he's a tired boy, they like to rest on substrate sometimes. You can get him a betta log/leaf too :) Do you have a picture of him?

82°F (nearly 28°C) is too warm for bettas, so try cranking the temp down to 76°F. Fin rot causing bacteria gain resistance in higher temperatures.
78-80 is the best temperature for a betta, slightly higher/lower is fine too. As long as it's stable, 82 is fine. They are tropical fish after all.

I'm not an expert on bettas but isn't 7.6 pH too high for bettas? I remember reading somewhere that they will not do well in the long run in high pH as they are a soft water fish.
That's fine, as long as it's stable! A stable pH is better than the right one (in most cases)
 
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Ouse

I'm not an expert on bettas but isn't 7.6 pH too high for bettas? I remember reading somewhere that they will not do well in the long run in high pH as they are a soft water fish.
Might not apply to betta splendens. Around 7.5 is the higher bound. It definitely applies to natural species, but betta splendens is manmade.
 
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JavaMossMan

That's fine, as long as it's stable! A stable pH is better than the right one (in most cases)
True. I wouldn't advocate changing the pH either.

Might not apply to betta splendens. Around 7.5 is the higher bound. It definitely applies to natural species, but betta splendens is manmade.
Possible it could have adapted to thrive in various tap water parameters like the zebra danios.
 
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carsonsgjs

Might not apply to betta splendens. Around 7.5 is the higher bound. It definitely applies to natural species, but betta splendens is manmade.
I think we may be getting mixed up between wild caught and captive-bred here. Wild caught would probably prefer softer water closer to their natural environment but captive-bred are fairly adaptable to a wider range of parameters.
 
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Ouse

I think we may be getting mixed up between wild caught and captive-bred here. Wild caught would probably prefer softer water closer to their natural environment but captive-bred are fairly adaptable to a wider range of parameters.
Yes, I mean captive bred, as crowntail bettas don’t exist in the wild. Wild caught bettas exist in soft, acidic water and are much different to betta splendens anyways. A wild caught betta would’ve died in this setup long ago.

A pH of 7.6 will do.
 
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Motherlovebetta

Turned the heater down a little. It’s stable at 7.6-I’m mostly concerned that he hasn’t come up for food this morning now. He has a log and a leaf and a 15g tank. Maybe he’s just tired and I’m overreacting. Thanks everyone.

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Ouse

You’re welcome. That is a nice setup for a betta. It’s much more advanced than what most bettas are subject to.

Likely tired. Swimming for betta splendens is the equivalent of trying to run in a wedding dress.

I’m supporting the choice of turning the temperature down if anything. Stress, damaged fins, naturally weak fish, high pH and high temp all combined, and you’re pretty much asking for fin rot causing bacteria to take hold. pH of 7.6 isn’t much to worry about though.
 
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