Best Yeast Recipe For Diy Co2?

Dave125g
  • #1
I use 1 table spoon of yeast 2 cups of sugar and 1 liter of water in each of my 2, 2 liter bottles. It gives me 2-3 BPS in my 10 gallon tank, and lasts about 8 days.

I've seen people use yeast, sugar, baking soda, and water. Why the baking soda? Does it possibly make the CO2 last longer? I will test this out next time I renew my system if I can't find the answer. I'm just wondering if this is just a waist of baking soda.

I would really like to know if someone has a recipe.
 
-Mak-
  • #2
I now use baking soda and citric acid because it’s more stable and seems to last longer, but in the past I used a jello and yeast recipe. You can find it by googling. The jello was meant to be a slow release food source for the yeast, but temperature heavily affects how fast the yeast work
 
Dave125g
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
I now use baking soda and citric acid because it’s more stable and seems to last longer, but in the past I used a jello and yeast recipe. You can find it by googling. The jello was meant to be a slow release food source for the yeast, but temperature heavily affects how fast the yeast work
How long does your citric acid recipe last.
 
aniroc
  • #4
When I was DIY CO2, my recipe was: 1/2 teaspoon yeast, 2 cups of sugar in 2 liter bottle. Lasts 2 weeks.
Boil the water to outgas chlorine or use 1 drop of Prime. Dissolve the sugar in hot water and add the yeast when is still warm. Shake. Make sure the yeast is fresh.
 
TexasGuppy
  • #5
I'll have to search but I was reading a post where somebody was experimenting with different ratios to get longer run times.
One tip I thought was good was to alternate refilling one of the two bottles each week for a more consistent output.
 
Dave125g
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
I'm curious what is the purpose of baking soda in the yeast mixture? I just use yeast sugar and water.
 
-Mak-
  • #7
How long does your citric acid recipe last.
At 1 bubble every 10 seconds, several weeks. I don't run a lot so I'm not sure what it'd be at a higher bps.
 
aniroc
  • #8
I'm curious what is the purpose of baking soda in the yeast mixture? I just use yeast sugar and water.
I believe it is used to buffer the water, so CO2 does not acidify the mixture and kill the yeast before alcohol does.
 
Dave125g
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
I believe it is used to buffer the water, so CO2 does not acidify the mixture and kill the yeast before alcohol does.
Thanks. I'll try that with my next renewal.
 
Dave125g
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
Well I tried adding a 1/2 tablespoon of baking soda this time and I'm only getting 1 BPS . I wonder if I made a mistake activating the yeast. I'll try it 1 more time on my next renewal. If the results are duplicated I will just go back to my original recipe.
 
TexasGuppy
  • #13
I've not tried this, but I know from making bread, you need a very specific range of temperature to properly activate the yeast. Do you measure out the water? Do you use tap water?
From reading some posts, room temperature will make a difference, so if it's colder outside or overnight, it could slow down the production. You could warming it a little or shaking it.
Although, keeping it warm uses electricity, not sure if that defeats the 'cheaper' goal of diy co2.
 
Dave125g
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
My hot tap water is right in there activation range. The room temperature does make a difference, but the room temperature hasn't changed from this week to last week. The only change was the addition of baking soda. I will try it again next time, and if the results are the same I'll know it's the baking soda.
 
Dave125g
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
Well the 2nd test with baking soda gave me the exact same results. I emptied the mix out and did the same recipe minus the baking soda and 2-3 bubbles per second is what I got. It looks like this is how I keep it. It's fine, it lasts 8 days, so I'm happy with that.
 

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