Best way to get rid of hair algae?

Dezbian

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I guess I've just been lucky somehow and never have run into this particular algae but it is currently residing very comfortably in my tank and I don't know what to do about it.

It's currently only on my java moss from what I can see, is there something that is safe for shirmp or snails I can use? Nobody is eating it so I figured I'd go ahead and try my luck on here.....

thanks for anyone's help!
 

thatfishlover122

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reduce lighting drastically, block out sunlight and turn off the lights (but live plants need some light so make sure you turn the lights on for at least an hour). Then manually remove it, use tweezers, you fingers, and scissors if possible. you can buy chemicals which kill algae but i prefer to not put uneccesary chemicals in my tanks :)
 

Redshark1

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Get your other plants growing well (so that you have to prune them around once a month) and algae takes a back seat in my experience (it gets outcompeted).
 

Tallen78

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Dezbian said:
I guess I've just been lucky somehow and never have run into this particular algae but it is currently residing very comfortably in my tank and I don't know what to do about it.

It's currently only on my java moss from what I can see, is there something that is safe for shirmp or snails I can use? Nobody is eating it so I figured I'd go ahead and try my luck on here.....

thanks for anyone's help!
Use a toothbrush and twirl it up
 

!poogs!

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726
You need to balance nutrients, with lighting, with plant demand.

Sometimes that a blackout, or an hour lighting as suggested. Your plants will need more than an hour of light to be hardy. So that is a short term solution. So what happens is when you go back to adequate lighting, the problem comes back. You may have to look at the amount of hours the lights are on, the intensity of the light, and the depth of the tank, to determine if your plants are getting too much light.

Nutrients, such as too much nitrogen or phosphorus can cause your problem. Same with iron and trace elements. Keep in mind your fish waste also provides nutrients in your tanks, your plants use. Post above suggested more plants. This sometimes help because the news plants take up the excess nutrients. You may still need to adjust your nutrients.

The last thing is CO2. Not everyone wants the expense Or hassle, and if low tech it can be done without CO2. Seachem excel is not a Replacement. It had a chemical composition that kills algae, and assists plants absorb carbon.

you may want to try a product like Purigen, to help absorb excess nutrients in the water. If you are use carbon as a chemical filter, you will want to get rid of it. Activated carbon has been associated with leaching phosphates in the water, which algae feed off of.

Some of my thoughts, as I too Have had to work through an algae problem in a fairly large tank. Good luck.
 
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Dezbian

Dezbian

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!poogs! said:
You need to balance nutrients, with lighting, with plant demand.

Sometimes that a blackout, or an hour lighting as suggested. Your plants will need more than an hour of light to be hardy. So that is a short term solution. So what happens is when you go back to adequate lighting, the problem comes back. You may have to look at the amount of hours the lights are on, the intensity of the light, and the depth of the tank, to determine if your plants are getting too much light.

Nutrients, such as too much nitrogen or phosphorus can cause your problem. Same with iron and trace elements. Keep in mind your fish waste also provides nutrients in your tanks, your plants use. Post above suggested more plants. this sometimes help because the news plants take up the excess nutrients. You may still need to adjust your nutrients.

The last thing is CO2. Not everyone wants the expense Or hassle, and if low tech it can be done without CO2. Seachem excel is not a Replacement. It had a chemical composition that kills algae, and assists plants absorb carbon.

you may want to try a product like Purigen, to help absorb excess nutrients in the water. If you are use carbon as a chemical filter, you will want to get rid of it. Activated carbon has been associated with leaching phosphates in the water, which algae feed off of.

Some of my thoughts, as I too Have had to work through an algae problem in a fairly large tank. Good luck.
thank you, I generally leave the lights on about 6 hours a day and a couple hours at night with blue led lights instead of the whites and then during the day I run both white and blue. nothing fancy. I also have a fluval co2 system on it b/c nobody has time for daily co2 and when we all can we graduate up the co2 ladder lol

I think you're dead on with over nutrients, I'm rescaping the tank soon and plan to put some more plants when I remove the driftwood to help cycle my new tank.

I've seen purigen before but cant remember, is this what is used to help with driftwood tannis as well? if so that'll be perfect when i do all my rescaping b/c new driftwood will be going into the 10 gallon as well. :)

I use thrive fertz and know they're pretty heavy so ill cut back on those as well, thank you for all your help!!
 

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