Best Way To Do An All-male Cichlid Tank?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by KevInLA, Jul 21, 2017.

  1. KevInLA

    KevInLAValued MemberMember

    So Im going to do an all-male tank but only 2-3 cichlid species...likely with a Bolivian or German Ram, Electric Blue Acara, and Kribensis. They will be in a 60 gallon 48x15x18 tank along with 6-10 corys, 6-10+ Tetras, and a Gold Nugget or Tiger pleco.

    Im trying to figure out which way is better to get the cichlids to be just male.
    I also keep hearing no matter how you stock your tank, you should put them all in at once....as well as getting at least 6 of a species while theyre juvies in order to get a male that is already used to the tank. I wonder if this will help stave territorial issues. Or is it ok to get only a single species at a time and then when I get the male I want go onto the next species and repeat....

    Can someone help me out with the best way to accomplish this? If I get them all at once Id have a pretty big bioload....though I will have 2 Fluval 306 filters running the tank.

    Thanks!
     
  2. kayla.s

    kayla.sWell Known MemberMember

    Well are you planning on getting the fish as juveniles? Because yes, they are nearly impossible to sex as babies, so you will probably have to buy a few and hope to get a male
     
  3. OP
    OP
    KevInLA

    KevInLAValued MemberMember

    Thats what it seems to be, though I was just making sure if there are any other ways to establish this type of tank without buying a bunch at once.
    That part is fine, but I guess my main question is towhether I should get several of all the species I wanna keep and crowd the tank a bit or go several of one species at a time?
     




  4. kayla.s

    kayla.sWell Known MemberMember

    One trick I have found if there is aggression in the tank is to take the fish that is being aggressive out of the tank for a day or two, then reintroduce the fish into the tank. This will disrupt it's feeling of ownership over certain territory. If you can't remove the fish, I have heard of rearranging the tank to also calm territorial behavior. So instead of heavily over stocking the tank, I'd suggest doing it one species at a time and then trying those methods of there is any aggression in the tank.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    KevInLA

    KevInLAValued MemberMember

    Yes I definitely plan on having an iso tank for that very thing in general. One species at a time does seem like the easier way to go, I just thought it'd be the more aggressive-prone way. I appreciate your insight!
     
  6. NavigatorBlack

    NavigatorBlackFishlore VIPMember

    The Ramirezi ram will be killed very quickly. An Altispinosa/Bolivian will survive.

    Their territorial needs don't vanish if an all male set up is used. They can become more aggressive as they try to figure out where their hopes and dreams have gone wrong. ;-)
    They want to breed, and that means holding a territory. If there are no females, they will hold their turf and wait for one, forever if you go with an all male set up.
    It's not a great life for a social fish...

    Kribs are easy to sex, but the others are not. At pet store sizes, many breeders buy six in the hopes of getting both sexes. It is that imprecise.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    KevInLA

    KevInLAValued MemberMember

    Indeed, not a great social life, lol - My biggest thing was to avoid breeding, Id prefer not to deal with that aspect if I can avoid it - Dealing with aggression minus the breeding aspect is something I feel I can manage, but also obviously aware nothing on the planet can completely mitigate such temperaments in cichlids...just trying to find the best way to reduce it as much as I can have control over =)
     
  8. kayla.s

    kayla.sWell Known MemberMember

    I reckon that even if there is breeding, if you don't step in and take the eggs/fry out, almost close to none would last (if you're worried about the population growing)
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2017
  9. NavigatorBlack

    NavigatorBlackFishlore VIPMember

    I would approach it differently. There are a lot of Cichlids that are very hard to breed. Conditions have to be right to trigger spawning.

    What's your water like? I'm sure we could suggest some Cichlids that would live long in it, but never spawn.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    KevInLA

    KevInLAValued MemberMember

    Ive only gotten as far as testing my water after sitting for 48 hours, which came back at around 7.6-7.7, tough I will addd that I have 3 pieces of good sized mopani wood Im going to be putting in there along with a generous mix of artificial and llive plants (Amazon sword, java fern). Safe to assume ill have it consistent around 7.5 range once establlished. Im geting the tank this weekend so im still needing to cycle. Havent tested my dGH yet....
     
  11. NavigatorBlack

    NavigatorBlackFishlore VIPMember

    pH is easy to read, but hardness is what matters. You liked two rainforest Cichlids - one African and one South American, plus one laboratory made Cichlid based on a South American species. So it's kind of hard to get a read on your preferences.
    But there are lots of cichlids that can stay in small groups and never breed in water far from what they come from.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    KevInLA

    KevInLAValued MemberMember

    Yea I picked the Krib since I have read its the only african cichlid that can co-exist in an american tank, and im trying to keep to dwarves as much as possible to try and keep swimming room at a premium...and a slightly larger one (Acara) as a centerpiece. Ive also looked at a T-Bar in place of the EBA, if that matters.
    Furthermore, Im not even too attached to having a larger species, i can try and keep 3 different dwarf species too...
    Im even open to any suggestions you may have as well....

    I'll check my dGH tonight and then again tomorrow with water thats been out for 24 hours.
     




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