Best way to cull fry?

fabienne

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I'm still considering breeding my bettas, and I heard that if a fry is too sick to live happily you have to cull it. I was just wondering what the most humane / quickest / best way to do so is.
 

fish 321

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I think the fastest most humane way is squishing them.
 

MissNoodle

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Food for another fish. Its gone under a second, and its life isn't wasted.

At least that's my thoughts.
 

PascalKrypt

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MissNoodle said:
Food for another fish. Its gone under a second, and its life isn't wasted.

At least that's my thoughts.
Good excuse to keep a nice, interesting, small-to-medium sized predatory fish in a 20 to 30 gallon. Consider blue lyretails or wonder panchax.
 

fish 321

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PascalKrypt said:
Good excuse to keep a nice, interesting, small-to-medium sized predatory fish in a 20 to 30 gallon. Consider blue lyretails or wonder panchax.
Yes! feeding live food to predators like killifish is one of the funnest things.
 

SmallFishBlueFish

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I have friends who are Marine Biologists who have aquariums in their labs and when it's time for a fish to go they simply put them in a bowl of water and place them in the freezer.

As others have said, if you have larger fish who can eat them that'd probably be the best since that larger fish gains the nutrients and nothing is wasted.
 
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fabienne

fabienne

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Thank you all for your answers. I've never actually killed one of my pets before and I really hate the thought of it but if it's really best for them I am willing to do it. Does it get easier?
 

MissNoodle

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I think that depends on the person.
Maybe best way is to keep a school of larger tetras (serpae, skirts, etc) so its quick, and you can leave the room if you don't want to see it. No evidence for you to see it, itll be easier to handle I think.

But yes sometimed its necessary. And the kindest option
 

bizaliz3

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fabienne said:
Thank you all for your answers. I've never actually killed one of my pets before and I really hate the thought of it but if it's really best for them I am willing to do it. Does it get easier?
Welcome to the world of breeding!! Lol culling is s huge part of breeding responsibly unfortunately.

Yes, I can tell you from experience, it does get easier over time. I breed angelfish. And it was really hard at first. I tried to keep the deformed fish as pets. But that's not realistic. Not if you want to continue breeding for many years as I have. Every batch is bound to have at least one or two with deformities. And it adds up quick batch after batch. So eventually I had to accept that culling was something I had to do if I wanted to be serious about breeding angels.

Luckily I do have one predator tank with a jack Dempsey who eats the culls quick. Circle of life baby!! The hardest part is when the deformity is not noticed until the babies are bigger. The bigger they are, the harder it is to cull them in my opinion. So it's best to try and find any deformities as early as possible.

Some people will bring culls to the lfs and sell the good ones themselves. This is very irresponsible because the buyer at the lfs may not recognize the deformity. Or may not appreciate that its genetic and may end up breeding them causing more and more deformed fish.

Unfortunately culling is what is best for the species. Nature does the culling in the wild. We have to step in and do the culling as breeders. The fish lay 100s of eggs frequently. Nature would not allow them all to survive. Especially the deformed ones. And Neither should we.

Good luck with your breeding projects!
 

PascalKrypt

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Not sure if I would advise it, but if you breed with less than sterile, spotless care, the weaker fry won't survive anyhow. It is quite unnatural to get a hundred or even a dozen adults surviving from a single clutch of eggs. It just doesn't happen that way in nature.
Just make sure you know where the line is so you don't end up killing everything indiscriminately or damaging the surviving fry.
For instance, you could be a bit less careful to 100% temp match during water changes, a change larger amounts in one go. Strong fry should not keel over from a one or two degree swing, nor from a bit of flow. Don't dose anti-bacterials in the water, fry should be strong enough for their immune system to fight off trouble as long as you maintain the tank well and don't let food rot.
I also tend to wait a bit longer before separating fry of different sizes. Runts will be eaten by their siblings and turn into a food source that propels growth in the remaining fry.

Some tiny changes that may help you not having to cull as many fry later down the line.
 
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fabienne

fabienne

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Hey so I just came across a really good explanation on the clove oil method of euthanizing fish and I was wondering if that would work on fry too? because honestly, this is the way that feels most comfortable to me and if this would work for fry too I think I would be able to do it without feeling too bad about it
 

bizaliz3

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fabienne said:
Hey so I just came across a really good explanation on the clove oil method of euthanizing fish and I was wondering if that would work on fry too? because honestly, this is the way that feels most comfortable to me and if this would work for fry too I think I would be able to do it without feeling too bad about it
Yes that will work for fry as well.
 

kallililly1973

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Give them to your LFS for store credit and let them sort it out. If your squishing fish that's just wrong. That also goes for snails dogs cats reptiles turtles horses goats cows lambs chickens roosters hens ducks ducklings.... They are living creatures.... Don't breed if you don't have a humane plan.
 
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fabienne

fabienne

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kallililly1973 said:
Give them to your LFS for store credit and let them sort it out. If your squishing fish that's just wrong. That also goes for snails dogs cats reptiles turtles horses goats cows lambs chickens roosters hens ducks ducklings.... They are living creatures.... Don't breed if you don't have a humane plan.
No one said I was squishing them but alright
 

e_watson09

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The predator route honestly is what I have found as the easiest for me. I am big on the circle of life and everything happens for a reason. Fish fry are actually SUPER healthy for adult fish to eat. Trying to find them as early as possible is key.

kallililly1973 said:
Give them to your LFS for store credit and let them sort it out. If your squishing fish that's just wrong. That also goes for snails dogs cats reptiles turtles horses goats cows lambs chickens roosters hens ducks ducklings.... They are living creatures.... Don't breed if you don't have a humane plan.
Giving them to the LFS is actually a really irresponsible thing to do as they will sell them and the cycle will continue of fish that are deformed and suffer in life. I personally don't think encouraging lifelong suffering is a "humane plan"
 
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fabienne

fabienne

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e_watson09 said:
The predator route honestly is what I have found as the easiest for me. I am big on the circle of life and everything happens for a reason. Fish fry are actually SUPER healthy for adult fish to eat. Trying to find them as early as possible is key.



Giving them to the LFS is actually a really irresponsible thing to do as they will sell them and the cycle will continue of fish that are deformed and suffer in life. I personally don't think encouraging lifelong suffering is a "humane plan"
Yeah I'm definitely not putting any sick fish in the hands of people that do not know how to care for them. You see, if I get a sick fish that's healthy and happy enough to live but just can't breed I don't think I'd want to cull them. I also do not have any big predator fish and I am unable to get them so... I'm just going for the clove oil method because it's available for me and I won't feel bad about culling them because at least it will be painless (and it can be done at any size/age)
 

bizaliz3

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fabienne said:
Yeah I'm definitely not putting any sick fish in the hands of people that do not know how to care for them. You see, if I get a sick fish that's healthy and happy enough to live but just can't breed I don't think I'd want to cull them. I also do not have any big predator fish and I am unable to get them so... I'm just going for the clove oil method because it's available for me and I won't feel bad about culling them because at least it will be painless (and it can be done at any size/age)
Sick fish are never healthy. Lol
I think you mean deformed fish. Culls are not sick fish. They are genetically undesirable fish.
 
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fabienne

fabienne

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bizaliz3 said:
Sick fish are never healthy. Lol
I think you mean deformed fish. Culls are not sick fish. They are genetically undesirable fish.
Yeah sorry lol that's what I meant I'm not a native english speaker
 

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