Best products to get rid of nitrates

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blennylover2323

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okay so I have just finished cycling my 5 gallon betta tank and foolishly ordered a mystery snail which is soon being shipped. the problem is that my nitrates are too high. I have done 2 50% water changes but am still way to high around 40ppm. I do need my tank to be ready soon for my snail so I was hoping to buy some products or something to get rid of them quick!!

all help highly appreciated!!
 
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The_fishy

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blennylover2323 said:
okay so I have just finished cycling my 5 gallon betta tank and foolishly ordered a mystery snail which is soon being shipped. the problem is that my nitrates are too high. I have done 2 50% water changes but am still way to high around 40ppm. I do need my tank to be ready soon for my snail so I was hoping to buy some products or something to get rid of them quick!!

all help highly appreciated!!
Have you tested your source water for nitrates? That may be the reason why your water changes aren’t having a big impact.

If you do have high nitrates in the source water, I would consider water from another source or adding a ton of plants, especially floaters. Remineralized RO would also work, but the initial equipment cost might not be worth it for a tank that size.
 
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fishkeepinginaisa

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blennylover2323 said:
okay so I have just finished cycling my 5 gallon betta tank and foolishly ordered a mystery snail which is soon being shipped. the problem is that my nitrates are too high. I have done 2 50% water changes but am still way to high around 40ppm. I do need my tank to be ready soon for my snail so I was hoping to buy some products or something to get rid of them quick!!

all help highly appreciated!!
If you need a quick fix, you can use bottled water for a tank that size until you sort something out.
 
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Fae

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Seconding testing your source water, also adding more plants!
 
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blennylover2323

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Okay so I tested the tap water and it turns out the water has 40ppm!! So i found out that at my LPS they sell 20L aquarium water which has work great!! my tank is now at 15ppm. Is that okay for fish or should I do another water change?
Thanks!!
 
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Flyfisha

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Hi blennylover2323,
You will find each of us has a different idea about a safe level for nitrates.

A few of my ideas.
Any Orange on the api test is fine ..
Some red at around 40 ppm is fine just before a water change.
Anything under 80 ppm- 100ppm is ok short term. Not ideal but Ok if you have been slacking or on holiday.
Anything over 80ppm - 100 and it’s time to increase the number of water changes each week. Not a safe place to be long term. And probably a water change very soon .
Any higher is an immediate water change.

short answer,
it’s not red it’s not a problem.
15 ppm is safe.

You have grown up drinking 40 ppm nitrates. It’s not as bad as many people think.?
 
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Mazeus

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My tap water naturally has 40ppm nitrate. Unless you are keeping something seriously sensitive like caridina shrimp (in which case you should be using RO water anyway) I really wouldn't worry about it. My aquariums have been fine for years on 40ppm from the tap. There are plants that are excellent nitrate absorbers like hornwort and duckweed (I know lots of people hate it, but it is probably the best plant for getting out nitrates). If you test my tanks you'll find around 10ppm, plants work.
 
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Flyfisha

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To add to what Mazeus has suggested with using plants in an aquarium. Plants that have their leaves in the air like floating plants are more able to easily take in CO2 from the air. This gives them the ability to take in more nitrates faster. One of the common indoor house plants used is pothos. With just the roots in the water it is able to lower nitrates.3C5F222C-B734-4F26-9D87-6912A3CA522B.jpeg
 
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Mazeus

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Pothos! Yes, excellent suggestion (and a beautiful house plant!).
 
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JettsPapa

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Flyfisha said:
To add to what Mazeus has suggested with using plants in an aquarium. Plants that have their leaves in the air like floating plants are more able to easily take in CO2 from the air. This gives them the ability to take in more nitrates faster. One of the common indoor house plants used is pothos. With just the roots in the water it is able to lower nitrates.
I have wandering Jew in a few of my tanks. It grows well also.
 
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KingJamal2

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I agree with everyone who has said to add live plants. They look great and fish like them
 
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blennylover2323

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thanks for all the replies!!
I do have live plants in my tank, but am very interested in getting some more plants which are great at sucking up nitrates. my plant stock is as follows
narrow leaf java fern
singapore moss
java moss
twisted val
zealandia chainsword
Anubias nana
riccia fluitans - floating

here is a picture:
IMG_4022.jpg
 
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The_fishy

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blennylover2323 said:
thanks for all the replies!!
I do have live plants in my tank, but am very interested in getting some more plants which are great at sucking up nitrates. my plant stock is as follows
narrow leaf java fern
singapore moss
java moss
twisted val
zealandia chainsword
Anubias nana
riccia fluitans - floating

here is a picture:
IMG_4022.jpg
I have water spangles and really like them! Maybe try those, a larger anubias, or some stem plants.
5AE9FE01-4AF2-4482-9206-56426E2CD473.jpeg
The red temple and subwassertang are due for a trim, I’m willing to look into shipping if you would like to try those.
 
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