Best dwarf cichlid for a community tank? how about nannacara anomala or dicrossus filamentosus?

mang0
Member
I'm planning a 20 gallon long, which isn't huge. But I'm interested in a dwarf cichlid, as suggested to me by others. It'll be well planted and have 6-8 bronze corydoras in it too. If none will work, then I'll try something else!
Some have recommended nannacara anomala or dicrossus filamentosus but I'm not sure.
My water is a little higher than 7 in terms of ph, but I can use tannins to lower it. gh is 5 kh is like 4 or 5.
I'll take any recommendations! I want to try a dwarf cichild, I've heard good things and wanted to expand to something a little bit more unusual than what I was already planning (honey gourami, nothing wrong with them but I thought something new could be fun).
 
Lana1049
Member
When I had dwarf cichlids (blue rams and kribensis), I absolutely adored them. Blue rams especially, the way they hesitate in the water and look frozen. I don’t know much about the cichlids you were recommended, but I will offer up that sand is great for dwarf cichlids, it allows them to dig in it and make their own little caves. German blue rams tend to be enhanced with color enhancing hormones though, so be careful if you do choose to get those. Whatever it is, I think you’ll be really glad about choosing a dwarf.
 
  • Thread Starter
mang0
Member
Lana1049 said:
When I had dwarf cichlids (blue rams and kribensis), I absolutely adored them. Blue rams especially, the way they hesitate in the water and look frozen. I don’t know much about the cichlids you were recommended, but I will offer up that sand is great for dwarf cichlids, it allows them to dig in it and make their own little caves. German blue rams tend to be enhanced with color enhancing hormones though, so be careful if you do choose to get those. Whatever it is, I think you’ll be really glad about choosing a dwarf.
could you give a brief overview of what their care is like? and thank you for the info/input! do you know anything about bolivian rams as well?
 
MacZ
Member
Rams need temperature above the community average.
Dicrossus are very often wild caught and are a real blackwater species. They don't do very well in community settings (except a biotope community).
Nannacara could work. In case you are also looking into apistogramma: Of many species a single male is to be preferred to a pair in your tank size, except if you have a tank open to move the male or the female to in case there is too much agression.
 
FishAndDoom
Member
Not all rams need above average community temps, Bolivian rams do quite well at more 'regular' temperatures.

My only real suggestion for any of these fish would be to use sand as your substrate. Generalizing it I know, but dwarf cichlids do like to dig a bit.
 
Lana1049
Member
Sure! I know blue rams prefer more soft water, although my water was hard as rocks and my rams still lived for a decent amount of time (though shorter than other cichlids on occasions, because of the color hormones). Like the person said above, they like their water around 81°F, which would just match with corydoras. Bolivian rams look similar, but are much more peaceful than blue rams. They also need acidic water, but unlike kribensis cichlids (which you could have a pair of), Bolivians need a bit more space so you’d just have one. I had a krib pair once, but they had fry and I butchered the situation because I took the dry away too fast and then the couple wanted to kill each other. So, Bolivians are a much more peaceful alternative although I don’t have much to offer on them.
 
MacZ
Member
FishAndDoom said:
Not all rams need above average community temps, Bolivian rams do quite well at more 'regular' temperatures.

My only real suggestion for any of these fish would be to use sand as your substrate. Generalizing it I know, but dwarf cichlids do like to dig a bit.
Bolivians weren't mentioned when I posted, or rather I overlooked the mention.

Sand as a substrate is indeed optimal for pretty much all dwarf cichlids.
 
mc12345
Member
mang0 said:
I'm planning a 20 gallon long, which isn't huge. But I'm interested in a dwarf cichlid, as suggested to me by others. It'll be well planted and have 6-8 bronze corydoras in it too. If none will work, then I'll try something else!
Some have recommended nannacara anomala or dicrossus filamentosus but I'm not sure.
My water is a little higher than 7 in terms of ph, but I can use tannins to lower it. gh is 5 kh is like 4 or 5.
I'll take any recommendations! I want to try a dwarf cichild, I've heard good things and wanted to expand to something a little bit more unusual than what I was already planning (honey gourami, nothing wrong with them but I thought something new could be fun).
I just recently got 4 bolivian rams from aquahuna. I've had them for about 2 weeks now and already love them. I've noticed that there is a lot of discussion on substrate to use, especially for dwarf cichlids. I have a 75 gallon tank with a blue acara, a few tetras, bolivian rams and eventually will add a gold severum. I used pool filter sand to fill the entire tank. It cost about $8 for a 50 lb. bag. Super cheap alternative to sand they sell at pet stores. The rams seem to love the sand too. My only suggestion if you are going to use pool filter sand is to rinse it thoroughly. I rinsed small portions approx. 3x each before adding to the tank and it still clouded the water. Once everything settled though, the tank looked great. I can't speak for other dwarf cichlids, but I believe that bolivian rams are more hardy than other rams such as the german blue ram, gold ram, etc.
 
MacZ
Member
All other rams besides the bolivians are the same species, just many tankbred varieties. Ultimately there are only two species: Microgeophagus ramirezi (the actual ram) and M. altispinosus (the bolivian).
The name already says it: Geo - earth, phagus - eater. Earth eater.
They are part of the tribe of Geophagini, as are Apistogramma and most other South American dwarf cichlids. Sand is a must and even more important than the water parameters.
The kind of sand is irrelevant though. Pool filter sand, playsand... the cheapest I got at a building supply. Less than a Euro per 10-liter-BUCKET. But It had to be rinsed a lot.
 
mc12345
Member
MacZ said:
The kind of sand is irrelevant though. Pool filter sand, playsand... the cheapest I got at a building supply. Less than a Euro per 10-liter-BUCKET. But It had to be rinsed a lot.
Agreed. I spent at least 1.5 hours rinsing 50 pounds of pool filter sand and I still don't think it was enough. Some people say they just add it to the tank without rinsing...this just baffles me. Super cheap, but super messy lol. Still think it is a better alternative to the stuff sold at the local pet stores though.
 
FishDin
Member
I kept apistpgramma cacatuoides in a 29g community tank which I think has the same footprint as a 20 long. My water is pH 7.6. There was plenty of wood and leaves in the tank, but I never checked on the tank pH.

I think they are considered one of the easier small cichlids to keep. Mine were double red and quite striking. They lived with a pair of Bristlenose plecos and some Cardinal tetras and Hatchet fish. They loved eating pleco fry.

They bred a lot. I made sure there were enough caves for all the females.

Good luck with your new tank.
 
Tokarev
Member
FishDin said:
I kept apistpgramma cacatuoides in a 29g community tank which I think has the same footprint as a 20 long. My water is pH 7.6. There was plenty of wood and leaves in the tank, but I never checked on the tank pH.

I think they are considered one of the easier small cichlids to keep. Mine were double red and quite striking. They lived with a pair of Bristlenose plecos and some Cardinal tetras and Hatchet fish. They loved eating pleco fry.

They bred a lot. I made sure there were enough caves for all the females.

Good luck with your new tank.
How many cacatuoides did you have in a 29 gallon tank?
 
FishDin
Member
Tokarev said:
How many cacatuoides did you have in a 29 gallon tank?
Too many! I wasn't set up for breeding, so the fry grew up in the parents tank. I had to find them homes, but easily had a dozen adults in there at times. Never saw any conflicts or aggression. Everyone seemed happy, but I never planned to have more than the orriginal male and 2 females. Beginners mistake.
 

Latest threads

Top Bottom