Berried Amano

Willswaterworld

Member
So, I am a bit new to the hobby. However I’m an avid reader and study so have caught up on my lack of knowledge mostly.
But I have a new problem I am not able to find lots of info on.

A pregnant Amano shrimp.

I have 3 questions
- Do shrimp that are berried need to be fertilised or are they like some other animals where the eggs can be dormant?
- if i leave her in the freshwater tank, will the guppies eat the larvae?
- should I take the eggs (if unfertilised) or the larvae our of the tank or should I let the fish sort them out?

Basically, when it comes to Amano shrimp I have no idea
 

Feohw

Member
1. When a shrimp is carrying eggs in its pleopods they are fertile. The eggs are infertile when they are developing in their saddle, but she will only pass the eggs down after she has mated, so the eggs are fertilized as they pass from the saddle to the pleopods. If for some reason they weren't fertilized they wouldn't carry them for long before dropping.

2 + 3. You won't even notice them. They will be so small that they won't be seen or impact water quality. They won't last long in freshwater, dying or being eaten. So you can just leave them in the tank.
 

Mhamilton0911

Member
Amanos are hard to breed, read up on thier breeding. I'm pretty sure the eggs need salt water to grow and hatch. They will carry eggs easy but cannot hatch in freshwater.
 
  • Thread Starter

Willswaterworld

Member
thanks Feohw & Mhamilton0911
 

barbiespoodle

Member
I adore my amano shrimp, but the biggest heartbreak for me is the fact that while my females berry, I'm just not set up to raise the babies. If you research raising amano shrimp, you'll see it's a very complicated process with little success, way beyond my expertise.

I think if I was able, I would keep only amano shrimp. But since I'm not, I put cherry shrimp in the same tank. With them I'm able to watch my berried females hatch babies and then watch those babies grow up, I'm on my third generation now and my colony has grown in leaps and bounds and I do enjoy those silly little red things.

Meanwhile, once my beloved amano shrimp are gone, I won't be replacing them, just too hard on me.
 

BigSteve

Member
I love my Amanos as well but i just accept that as there will be no offspring i will have to replace them in the future. They bring a smile to my face every day.
 

barbiespoodle

Member
BigSteve said:
I love my Amanos as well but i just accept that as there will be no offspring i will have to replace them in the future. They bring a smile to my face every day.
Got to agree, they also make me smile. They are such cheeky buggers and so personable that they swim into my hand. I'll watch them carry off whole pieces of prized food or gently flick the cherry shrimp off food they eat off the bottom. I always make sure there is enough food to go around since the amanos are such little pigs. And while I have read that you shouldn't keep cherry's with amanos because of the competition for food, I have never seen them hurt my cherry's and they haven't kept my cherry colony from growing, I've even seen cherry's riding the amano's, which is also way cute.

And here's a story about one of my amano's. Back when I was shrimp stupid, maybe around a year and a half or two years ago :rolleyes:, I saw some amano's at the lfs and was captivated by them. Not knowing better, I put them in the 55 gallon community which is very shrimp unfriendly.

Once I learned my mistake, I removed them when I set up a live bearer grow out tank which ended up being my first shrimp tank.

Meanwhile the community went through totally rescaping, through it all, at one point or another, all the plastic came out to be replaced by natural, there were even some points where the tank was next to bare of any decorations as this happened.

A couple months ago I was fussing over the 55 gallon community when I saw what I thought was one of my long hairs that fell in the tank. Imagine my surprise when I went to remove it and that "hair" turned out to be an amano shrimp antennae? I watch this tank constantly and thought I knew every inch of it, but somehow this little survivor not only remained hidden throughout the rescaping but managed to elude all the shrimp hungry fish in the tank for all that time. Being such a survivor, believe me, he was not easy to catch, but now he's safe and sound in the shrimp tank and finally feeling secure enough to be out and about, kind of became a favorite of mine.

This is just an example of why I love amano's
 

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