Barometric pressure drop giving my Barbs a headache???

MarcusPfeiffer

New guy here... First post... I'm looking forward to discovering all that this place has to offer, and hopefully be able to contribute as well.

I'm a routine sufferer of headaches when the barometric pressure drops. I can always tell when we're in for bad weather. Having this "Super-Power" has already caused me to observe relationships of the seemingly unrelated... that's why I have noticed the same thing in my Tiger Barbs!

On any given day, I call my Tiger Barbs, my "Piranhas". They're active, all over the tank and fun to watch. When I have a pressure headache and go to feed the Piranhas, I find them huddled up in a corner of the tank displaying signs of stress. They don't even have the usual voracious appetite.
This doesn't seem to be affected by water quality, as it happens regardless whether I've recently changed water, or am due for a change.

I've heard from fishermen that freshwater fish respond differently in different weather, but these are indoor tropical fish.

Has anyone experienced the same thing, or can shed some light on this behaviour?

Thanks in advance!
 

MacZ

They don't react to weather as some of us do, but fish can sense changes in pressure, can hear and some other things. Many fish react to storms. Why yours are reacting the way they do is at best guesswork, though.
 

MarcusPfeiffer

Indeed... I'm just guessing too. It's bizarre but so closely follows the barometric pressure drops.
I notice you're from Germany... I emigrated to Canada from Germany when I was a kid. Krefeld (Düsseldorf).
 

MacZ

Indeed... I'm just guessing too. It's bizarre but so closely follows the barometric pressure drops.
I notice you're from Germany... I emigrated to Canada from Germany when I was a kid. Krefeld (Düsseldorf).
Many of my fish are reacting to weather changes aswell.

Ha small world! I'm in Bonn for over a decade now, but originally from Viersen. I still have friends and family in Krefeld.
 

LowConductivity

New guy here... First post... I'm looking forward to discovering all that this place has to offer, and hopefully be able to contribute as well.

I'm a routine sufferer of headaches when the barometric pressure drops. I can always tell when we're in for bad weather. Having this "Super-Power" has already caused me to observe relationships of the seemingly unrelated... that's why I have noticed the same thing in my Tiger Barbs!

On any given day, I call my Tiger Barbs, my "Piranhas". They're active, all over the tank and fun to watch. When I have a pressure headache and go to feed the Piranhas, I find them huddled up in a corner of the tank displaying signs of stress. They don't even have the usual voracious appetite.
This doesn't seem to be affected by water quality, as it happens regardless whether I've recently changed water, or am due for a change.

I've heard from fishermen that freshwater fish respond differently in different weather, but these are indoor tropical fish.

Has anyone experienced the same thing, or can shed some light on this behaviour?

Thanks in advance!
I 100% buy into this. As a fisherman, a low pressure system will destroy good fishing for salmonids quickly. Steady barometer is fine, rising is fine, falling and I'll just stay home. I've always speculated that it had something to do with swimbladder.
 

MacZ

I've always speculated that it had something to do with swimbladder.
Fish indeed sense air pressure with their swim bladders.
 

Flyfisha

Hi MarcusPfeiffer welcome to fishlore.

I am a recreational fisherman myself which is no surprise with my username.

What I have seen many times with my aquarium fish is spawning behaviour around the time of a thunderstorm. Corydoras are the most obvious species to be triggered by a quick drop in the barometer.
 

MarcusPfeiffer

Ha small world! I'm in Bonn for over a decade now, but originally from Viersen. I still have friends and family in Krefeld.
I always passed by Viersen on the way to my aunt's place in Mönchengladbach. Very close! Small world indeed!
 

Hellfishguy

Dojo loaches used to be known as weather loaches. When barometric pressure drops, instead of hiding, they’ll swim erratically around the tank for most of the day.
 

Lucy

Hi welcome to FishLore!!

Dojo loaches used to be known as weather loaches. When barometric pressure drops, instead of hiding
they’ll swim erratically around the tank for most of the day.
As soon as I saw the title I thought of weather loaches.
 

Cherryshrimp420

New guy here... First post... I'm looking forward to discovering all that this place has to offer, and hopefully be able to contribute as well.

I'm a routine sufferer of headaches when the barometric pressure drops. I can always tell when we're in for bad weather. Having this "Super-Power" has already caused me to observe relationships of the seemingly unrelated... that's why I have noticed the same thing in my Tiger Barbs!

On any given day, I call my Tiger Barbs, my "Piranhas". They're active, all over the tank and fun to watch. When I have a pressure headache and go to feed the Piranhas, I find them huddled up in a corner of the tank displaying signs of stress. They don't even have the usual voracious appetite.
This doesn't seem to be affected by water quality, as it happens regardless whether I've recently changed water, or am due for a change.

I've heard from fishermen that freshwater fish respond differently in different weather, but these are indoor tropical fish.

Has anyone experienced the same thing, or can shed some light on this behaviour?

Thanks in advance!
Yes fish knows when it rains (from the pressure change I assume). It also triggers spawning behavior in some fish.
 

DoubleDutch

It exact is what a lot of members here mention.

A drop of the barometer often means "end of the dry season" and the start of a new cycle of rain / fresh water / expanding living space / food / etc etc....

So for a lot of fish the sign to give there young the best possible chance of surviving and living a good life = spawning.

Gouramis use the high temps (end of the dry season) as signal which is just before the rainsignal.

Several mamals have a planning likewise but that takes longer to plan (they don't simply drop their eggs at the right moment) Young are born when plains are overgrown with grass, plants flower and provide fruits e.t.c.

So I think it isn't a headache but an ache / itch in other places in the body.
 

WRWAquarium

What an interesting thread, I've never considered the effects of atmospheric pressure on fish.
 

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