Banded Killifish Care

BettaNation
  • #1
Hi, my question is what's the best conditions for banded Killifish in captivity? I recently acquired a nicely sized male and two other fish that may be juveniles of the same species or a different coexistant species. I caught them in a river that is brackish but on the low end of the spectrum of salinity. I cannot say the definite salinity though. I do believe I read these fish can survive many ranges of salinity. I do realize since they are wild caught, they will not be accustomed to flaked food so I have bought blood worms and other food mixes for fish and I will try to get them eating the fish food I have ( it's already high in protein and it's the best you can get at a petstore) but I was wondering about tank size and decorations as these fish come from a river so they would not encounter a SpongeBob decoration lol. I'm thinking about driftwood but it releases tannins and I don't know how the tannins would be with the killifish. And I'm wondering about substrate as well.
As of right now I have them in a ten gallon with some marine salt but not too crazy just a little. Yes I know that's extremely small tank size but that's only for now and I have a filter and a air pump that's aerating the water as well as giving it movement. Once I have saved up, I'm planning to get a 55 gallon and I'm thinking of a sand substrate with some driftwood and some soft fake plants or maybe live if they are tolerant of brackish and don't require special lighting etc. And maybe I could get some rocks too as the habitiat they were in before did have rocks that they'd hide in. I would like to know if there is anything more I should add or anything else to enchance it the future tank. I'll be going back at some point for some more ( if I can catch them haha)
Thanks
 
DanniD
  • #2
Pretty cool project you got going on there. I'd aI'm to make it as close to where you got them from as possible. Sand substrate with smooth river rocks are probably a good idea. I'd definitely go for the driftwood. You can boil it before if you don't want tannins but the fish won't/shouldn't mind. It's actually good for the water. Get live plants if possible, maybe java ferns will be ok? I'm not too sure. You won't need anything special to keep java ferns alive.
 
chromedome52
  • #3
Well, as I said in the ID thread just a short time ago, your killifish is a Mummichog, not a Banded Killifish. So it is essentially a brackish water fish. Considering the size they can reach, a 55 is probably a good target size for their tank. I think your ideas on substrate and decorations are good. The tannins from driftwood are not going to have a significant effect in very hard or slightly brackish water, so it will be safe to use.

Make sure all tanks are well covered. These fish do like to jump.
 
BettaNation
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
Well, as I said in the ID thread just a short time ago, your killifish is a Mummichog, not a Banded Killifish. So it is essentially a brackish water fish. Considering the size they can reach, a 55 is probably a good target size for their tank. I think your ideas on substrate and decorations are good. The tannins from driftwood are not going to have a significant effect in very hard or slightly brackish water, so it will be safe to use.

Make sure all tanks are well covered. These fish do like to jump.
Oh yes that's why I have to go get a cover because the tank I have them in was set up last minute and the tank did not have any lid and I do not have a spare one but I will asap. For a 55, how much salt in tbs would you recommend as I've only ever had freshwater?
 
chromedome52
  • #5
I've never measured salt to put in tanks, so I couldn't tell you. I always had a barrel of saltwater mixed up for my brine shrimp hatchers, so I just put about 30-50% of the volume of the tank from the Saltwater barrel.

However, a lot depends on the salinity of the water they came from. You would want to check that before deciding how much salt to put in the tank.
 
BettaNation
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
I've never measured salt to put in tanks, so I couldn't tell you. I always had a barrel of saltwater mixed up for my brine shrimp hatchers, so I just put about 30-50% of the volume of the tank from the Saltwater barrel.

However, a lot depends on the salinity of the water they came from. You would want to check that before deciding how much salt to put in the tank.
Do you know the temperature tolerance for these fish?
 
erler08
  • #7
When I say 'native' I am referring to the place where the fish were caught: the Jock River in Ottawa, Canada.

I have been caring for 8 wild-caught banded killifish for about 2 months now. They range from 2"-3" in length have a diet of frozen bloodworms and Bug Bites. They are in a 29 gallon bowfront tank with a substrate of native rocks/stones as well as some white sand. I've also added a few pieces of native driftwood to the tank in hopes of getting some tannins into the water. Filtration is taken care of by x2 Aquaclear HOBs.

Plants include native hornwort (7 long stems), some java fern, native duckweed, and a mystery native plant. Their tank mates include one 2" native chub (minnow), 3 native clams, and a couple native ramshorn snails.

I am new to keeping any type of killifish and was hoping for some feedback/suggestions on how I can give these guys an ideal habitat. My goal is to get them to breed, & hopefully raise some fry.

Specifically, do they thrive at a specific temperature & pH, and which live foods are best for them? Also if there's anything I should change about my setup?

Photos will be uploaded soon!
 
sipec
  • #8
I'm thinking of getting some killis soon too, maybe I'll tag along
 
chromedome52
  • #9
Banded Killifish could be applied to one of several species. Care for each actually varies a little, so I will wait for pictures before dispensing advice.
 
erler08
  • #10

20191009_201322.jpg
20191009_201858.jpg
 
erler08
  • #11

20191009_202436.jpg
20191009_202359.jpg
 
chromedome52
  • #12
Fundulus diaphanus menona. So these guys get some size to them, about 5.5 inches, though 3.5-4 inches is more common. They are not like the Starhead Killies, which swim at the surface. They tend to stay a bit lower in the water column. Easy to feed, anything meaty, natural diet includes crustaceans, bugs, and mollusks. IME they are not overly aggressive. East of the Appalachians is F. d. diaphanus, the nominal subspecies, which is often found in brackish areas as well as fresh. There is a rare form from Lake Waccamaw in North Carolina that is sometimes called a subspecies of diaphanus, but currently considered it's own species, F. waccamensis.

F. d. menona is considered threatened in at least Wisconsin, maybe other states as well. Usually found in lakes and slow moving streams.

Breeding usually occurs in late spring. They will hang eggs in thick bushy plants/roots. Eggs are big, and fry will take bbs as soon as they hatch.
 
Truckjohn
  • #13
Some natives can be a challenge because they often need so many days of "Winter" water temperature and day lengths to set things straight in their biological cycle....

If they don't get this winter cycle - things often start to go downhill. Often they won't put on breeding colors or breed, they frequently decline physically, etc.

A good fisheries biologist probably would be able to fill in the blanks and give you a general idea for fish in that region....
 
chromedome52
  • #14
Some natives can be a challenge because they often need so many days of "Winter" water temperature and day lengths to set things straight in their biological cycle....

If they don't get this winter cycle - things often start to go downhill. Often they won't put on breeding colors or breed, they frequently decline physically, etc.

A good fisheries biologist probably would be able to fill in the blanks and give you a general idea for fish in that region....

Fortunately for OP, this species isn't one of those. They will do fine year round at 65-70 F temperatures. However, it is the increasing day length that triggers spring spawning.
 
erler08
  • #15
Thank you all (especially chromedome52 - they are indeed bottom-dwelling fish and hesitantly come to the surface for floating dried bloodworms) for your words of wisdom. All 8 Killis are doing well and a couple of them have actually put on a dark stripe along their dorsal fin. I have been doing 20% PWC bimonthly. The largest one is showing a little bit of territorial aggression.. should I be worried that he will start fin-nipping or is this likely just a chase-away type behaviour?
 
chromedome52
  • #16
I would not expect the chasing to cause serious damage. He is likely establishing a breeding area, where any female that wants to spawn can come in and have some fun!
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
7
Views
783
CichlidJynx
  • Locked
Replies
9
Views
971
YaziLeah
  • Locked
Replies
36
Views
1K
wishuponafish
  • Locked
  • Sticky
Replies
7
Views
124K
DiscusFan
  • Locked
Replies
7
Views
744
DaemonMortem
Top Bottom