Bad bacteria in filter?

  1. amdpayne Member Member

    My last neon passed away, so I'm cleaning out the whole tank and starting fresh, maybe with cherry barbs. Do I replace the filter too, in case there could be bad bacteria in there that killed my neons? I don't know officially what offed them...
     
  2. renthus Well Known Member Member

    If you're really worried about disease, rinse everything that's ever touched tank water with bleach, including the filter and media. The downside is that you'll have to cycle from scratch.

    For the record, neons are incredibly fragile. In the absence of evidence of disease, I'd be inclined to think that it was just neons being neons.
     

  3. Harlebleondora Well Known Member Member

    Have you tested your water? Are you sure it was bacteria that caused the death?
     
  4. atc84 Well Known Member Member

    neons are very sensitive to water quality, so if you have hard water or a higher ph then they won't be happy, or may even pass away.
     

  5. hampalong Fishlore VIP Member

    The kinds of bacteria that cause fish diseases don't live in filters, so it's very rare for a sterilization to be needed after a disease...
     
  6. amdpayne Member Member

    Hmm. I'll change the water 100%, clean the tank and decorations, and maybe the filter. :/ If bad bacteria like that doesn't usually grow on filters, and I'm not pos. it was bacteria anyway (ammonia issues if anything), I might just clean like crazy and get some fish. Are cherry barbs hearty? Will I need to cycle again if I clean the tank and decor but not the filter?
     
  7. 77Impala Well Known Member Member


  8. amdpayne Member Member

    Last time I checked it was all 'good,' or within decent limits, all 0, but nitrates were a little higher, and ammonia was too, but they were still considered acceptable. Honestly I don't remember now, but right now I've got my betta tank and doing 20% WCs every other day to help with potential fin rot.
     
  9. fishingdeep Member Member

    So you didn't do a fishless cycle or added to many fish at one time ..... STOP !!! Can you share what you did?
     
  10. renthus Well Known Member Member

    Sounds like you've got yourself a plan. Honestly, I think you just got unlucky. You got this, lol.

    Please, make my life easier and don't angrily assert baseless accusations at people who are putting in a great deal of effort and have, thus far, not shown themselves to have made any oh so horrible mistakes, including the ones you listed. It's rude. Tell the nice OP you're sorry, or you'll be sent to your room without dessert.
     

  11. amdpayne Member Member

    When I started the tank a month or two ago, I transferred over the neons from a cycled tank, and acclimated them for about 1.5 hrs, using drip method. The tank was originally cycled with fish and TSS. Casualties started just over a month or so after I acquired the fish. I believe the temp and probably ammonia were just too high for the neons, but it was over the course of 1-3 months that they eventually all passed away.

    I believe I got unlucky, yeah, but I probably didn't do everything just right either. I also think the ones I got were probably already ill. :/ Fragile neons... *sigh*

    Going to try a new breed next. Any suggestions? I'm thinking cherry barbs or some other small kind of tetra. Maybe rasboras. I want something a bit tougher than neons.

    Also, thank you. ;)
     
  12. renthus Well Known Member Member

    I've always loved my ember tetras, but they do best in a densely planted environment. Celestial Pearl Danios (aka Galaxy Raspboras) are a good option, too. If you like the look of neons, I think cardinal tetras are a bit tougher.
     
  13. amdpayne Member Member

    Interesting suggestions; thank you! Have you heard of jumbo neons? Are those really any different from regular neons? Also I have too heard that cardinals are a little better... half tempted to try those...
     
  14. Ben3721 Well Known Member Member

    When you say your ammonia was a bit high you have to give readings to us, so we can help. Any ammonia level over .25ppm can make a fish sick over a week. Ammonia is more deadly then any other water condition. I mean yeah something else could have done it but having ammonia in there didn't help. You'll find certain fish have to have a well aged and balanced tank. Kinda like an oto
     
  15. ricmcc Well Known Member Member

    I must agree with Ben3721, in that exact figures regarding your tank parameters would help.
    That said, I would also add that the acceptable level of ammonia is 0, likewise nitrite; many fish will survive traces of either, but their gills will be damaged to some extent, therefore making them less hardy in the long run.
    By no means am I saying that you have done anything wrong, I am rather saying that what you wish to have is a reading of 0, 0, and some nitrate.
    And I should add that all of us have had tanks with less then ideal readings, so please believe that no criticism is intended, but to help you, numbers rather than words like, good, are far more useful.
    All the best, rick
     
  16. amdpayne Member Member

    Ammonia was .25... I knew it was something like that but couldn't remember the exact way it read, but yes, it was .25. Nitrites were 0, and nitrates were not 0, but again, I don't remember the exact way it read. If I look at the chart, I'll remember.
     
  17. fishingdeep Member Member

    Please never think when we ask questions it is about you, we are only going on the facts. That is all we can help with so "thanks " for the honesty and keep us posted
     
  18. amdpayne Member Member

    I've never taken offense here, just can't remember the readings so I don't post them. :)

    Didn't know that about gills reacting to ammonia! Hmm. :/

    Oh I know! I'm not offended or hurt or anything... just don't remember exact numbers without looking at my chart, so I don't post them. :)

    I'll keep an eye on ammonia; thanks!