Baby Snake Will Not Eat

Princethepurplebetta

Well Known Member
Messages
943
Reaction score
279
Points
113
Location
Washington
Experience
More than 10 years
Hi guys. I work at a pet store and our vendor sent a tiny tiny corn snake. We've had it 3 weeks now and it wont eat. We've tried the smallest pinkies we have, and im trying crickets atm. What else should we try?

20190420_111703.jpg
 

Annie59

Well Known Member
Messages
728
Reaction score
574
Points
203
Location
USA IL
Experience
More than 10 years
Corn snakes don't eat crickets, it could stress it out if you leave them in the tank with it. Do you thaw the mouse?? I know silly question but I have to ask lol.

Also try to put it in a brown paper bag where it can't see anything and put the mouse and snake both in it and roll the top down to keep them in the bag together for about an hour and then check to see if it ate. If not leave it a bit longer and check again in about a half hour.

When I warm my mice up I use really hot water then once thawed I toss the water and again put it in hot water to warm it up more. I find they like the mouse pretty warm, sounds kinda nasty but I always feel the mouse's head to see if I feel ANY coolness that might indicate the brain is still cold/froze a bit. If so I will drain water and then add more hot water until the whole mouse is warm.

Looking at the photo that snake can easily eat that size pinky
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
OP
Princethepurplebetta

Princethepurplebetta

Well Known Member
Messages
943
Reaction score
279
Points
113
Location
Washington
Experience
More than 10 years
Corn snakes don't eat crickets, it could stress it out if you leave them in the tank with it. Do you thaw the mouse?? I know silly question but I have to ask lol.

Also try to put it in a brown paper bag where it can't see anything and put the mouse and snake both in it and roll the top down to keep them in the bag together for about an hour and then check to see if it ate. If not leave it a bit longer and check again in about a half hour.

When I warm my mice up I use really hot water then once thawed I toss the water and again put it in hot water to warm it up more. I find they like the mouse pretty warm, sounds kinda nasty but I always feel the mouse's head to see if I feel ANY coolness that might indicate the brain is still cold/froze a bit. If so I will drain water and then add more hot water until the whole mouse is warm.

Looking at the photo that snake can easily eat that size pinky
We thawed it with hot water. Ill try a paper bag, weve just been trying to feed her in a seperate tote so far
 

jjohnwm

Well Known Member
Messages
1,163
Reaction score
1,824
Points
173
Location
Interlake region of Manitoba, Canada
Experience
More than 10 years
As much as I abhor the idea of feeding live prey to snakes, this is a situation where that sometimes seems to help. Make sure that the tote you are attempting to feed in is kept in a suitably warm location, put in some paper towels or other material to act as cover, add a nice wriggly pinkie with the snake and then leave them alone for a few hours with the lights as dim as possible. Back when I was into reptiles I bred a lot of corn snakes and sand boas, and it wasn't uncommon for a baby to show reluctance to take its very first meal. This strategy worked almost every time.

And as @Annie59 said, forget the crickets. Not only will they not be eaten, but leaving a flighty little snake in a small enclosure with 4 or 5 crickets crawling around and over it, as in that pic, will be very counter-productive.
 

Annie59

Well Known Member
Messages
728
Reaction score
574
Points
203
Location
USA IL
Experience
More than 10 years
I never feed outside of their enclosure. Never have. I see no reason too. I've heard all the horror stories of them eating the substrate and the one that says if you feed inside their tank it causes them to bite. I have never had either of those happen
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
OP
Princethepurplebetta

Princethepurplebetta

Well Known Member
Messages
943
Reaction score
279
Points
113
Location
Washington
Experience
More than 10 years
As much as I abhor the idea of feeding live prey to snakes, this is a situation where that sometimes seems to help. Make sure that the tote you are attempting to feed in is kept in a suitably warm location, put in some paper towels or other material to act as cover, add a nice wriggly pinkie with the snake and then leave them alone for a few hours with the lights as dim as possible. Back when I was into reptiles I bred a lot of corn snakes and sand boas, and it wasn't uncommon for a baby to show reluctance to take its very first meal. This strategy worked almost every time.

And as @Annie59 said, forget the crickets. Not only will they not be eaten, but leaving a flighty little snake in a small enclosure with 4 or 5 crickets crawling around and over it, as in that pic, will be very counter-productive.
We sadly can not feed live rodents, its against our store policy
 

Rtessy

Fishlore VIP
Messages
7,090
Reaction score
3,474
Points
348
Location
Atlanta, GA
Experience
4 years
Are live earthworms against policy? I forgot what snake, but some will go for earthworms if they're refusing pinkies. Also, I think the general verdict is to feed in their living container. Sure hope the little fellow feels better soon!
 

Little Blue Ram

Valued Member
Messages
58
Reaction score
16
Points
93
Location
Where it rains constantly
Experience
4 years
You could try a reptile appetite stimulant if all else fails. I personally have never had much luck with it, but i know when i worked at Petsmart it worked about 50 percent of the time with ball pythons that refused to eat.
 

jjohnwm

Well Known Member
Messages
1,163
Reaction score
1,824
Points
173
Location
Interlake region of Manitoba, Canada
Experience
More than 10 years
We sadly can not feed live rodents, its against our store policy
I support that policy whole-heartedly; I suggest this only as a one-time event. Feeding live rodents is dangerous for the snake and a very inhumane way to treat the mammal. Usually, once the first meal is taken, this doesn't need to be repeated.

I generally agree with @Annie59 about feeding in the regular enclosure, but in this case (a pet store, lots of possible outside stimuli and distractions, potentially lots of stress) not so much. You'd have all the oohing and aahing from the up-and-coming mall ninjas, not to mention the inevitable suggestions from the meat-is-murder crowd about feeding the snakes an all-tofu diet (yes, I've gotten that more than once...). At least move the cage into a backroom or somewhere else quiet for the feeding attempt. Not a bad idea to try it at closing time and leave it overnight also. Once the snake begins feeding regularly, I still don't think you will want to feed it while on public display.
 

Annie59

Well Known Member
Messages
728
Reaction score
574
Points
203
Location
USA IL
Experience
More than 10 years
Could it be that moving them to the seperate tote stresses them out and they don’t want to eat?
I support that policy whole-heartedly; I suggest this only as a one-time event. Feeding live rodents is dangerous for the snake and a very inhumane way to treat the mammal. Usually, once the first meal is taken, this doesn't need to be repeated.

I generally agree with @Annie59 about feeding in the regular enclosure, but in this case (a pet store, lots of possible outside stimuli and distractions, potentially lots of stress) not so much. You'd have all the oohing and aahing from the up-and-coming mall ninjas, not to mention the inevitable suggestions from the meat-is-murder crowd about feeding the snakes an all-tofu diet (yes, I've gotten that more than once...). At least move the cage into a backroom or somewhere else quiet for the feeding attempt. Not a bad idea to try it at closing time and leave it overnight also. Once the snake begins feeding regularly, I still don't think you will want to feed it while on public display.
Yea I didn't mean to feed it in the store that way lol. That's probably the problem, bright lights and to much activity go in on around it.
 

JLeeM

Well Known Member
Messages
3,852
Reaction score
2,212
Points
308
Location
Tennessee
Experience
2 years
As far as the whole brain matter trick, that really helped my corn snake figure out feeding time. The skull of a pinkie is very brittle. I simply poked a little hole in the head (after thawing) and gently sqeezed it a tiny bit with the feeding tongs. Eventually, they should lock right onto the smell.
 

Thedudeiam94

Well Known Member
Messages
761
Reaction score
929
Points
103
Location
VA
Sometimes it just take some time. Snakes usually only eat once a month. Just give it some time maybe wait another week if the snake doesn’t seem interested then just be patient. It will eventually come around. Just hold the pinky with tongs and try making it look more natural adding some lively movements such as shaking or dragging it across the bottom of the enclosure also make sure the pinky is m warm to the touch (not too hot but “just right”) like Goldilocks and the three bears. Hopefully everything works out and it will be hungry in the next week or so.
 

Annie59

Well Known Member
Messages
728
Reaction score
574
Points
203
Location
USA IL
Experience
More than 10 years
Gotta do what they call the zombie dance with the mouse. Hold it by the scruff of the neck with your tongs and move it around like its alive. Unlike the the site that was posted up a bit do not tap the snake on the head with it.
 

david1978

Fishlore Legend
Messages
13,081
Reaction score
9,340
Points
758
Location
pa usa
Experience
More than 10 years
Gotta do what they call the zombie dance with the mouse. Hold it by the scruff of the neck with your tongs and move it around like its alive. Unlike the the site that was posted up a bit do not tap the snake on the head with it.
In my defence I'm not a big snake person and from what I know it sounded about right. Lol .
 
Toggle Sidebar




Top Bottom