Are these parameters safe for Cherrys?

St4rving_4rtist

This is the current water parameters in my 20g - pH: 6.4, Ammonia: 0.25ppm, Nitrite: 0ppm, Nitrate: 10ppm. Is this safe for the cherry shrimp? The tank has a Fluval 206 filter from an established tank and the tank is used with some algae growing on the sides. The substrate is also a "shrimp substrate" designed for planted shrimp aquariums. Should i wait longer?
 

richiep

How long as it been running and would you possibly have gh reading
 
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St4rving_4rtist

The filter had been running for about 3 years I believe, and I don't have a kit to test for gH. The new setup with new substrate has been running for 2 days now.
 
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richiep

The filter will give things a boost but even when i short cut like this i still give the tank at least a month , your parameters will not be stable yet i normally put a few fish in for the month to help stable things
 
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barbiespoodle

I'm hoping other shrimpy people pipe up here to help you.

But here is mho. The main thing I'm questioning, and again, I hope the shrimpy people pipe in here, is the ph.

I'm now up to 3 cherry shrimp tanks and my ph is around 8.5 at it's lowest because of my well water, granted that is on the high side, but I work with what I have. Otherwise, my other prams are pretty close to yours. And two of my shrimp tanks are also 20 gallons, the third being a 10 gallon.

Thing is the reason I'm now on my third shrimp tank is because with this high ph, my first tank, the reds. has been way prolific to say the least. I never have a moult problem in any of the tanks, am constantly seeing berried females, as well as babies all the time. And I'm having the same experience with my blue tank and the most recent, cull tank. In each I started with a few shrimp and now each has a large population and has become active, fascinating tanks to watch.

With your ph you might want to look into the cardinia's instead of the neo cardinia's, aka, cherry shrimp. Personally I would love to be able to have the cardinia's, I think they are beautiful. But at this stage of my life I prefer just to embrace my water and only keep aquatic life that can handle it instead of putting all the work into changing it, makes my tanks a pleasure/therapy instead of just another job to get done, I have enough jobs that need done, I don't want my tanks to be just another.

To be fair, there are ways to add the calcium that such a lower ph needs in order to keep cherry shrimp, like cuttle bones used for birds being one example, that part is up to you. Through 50 years of fish keeping, I have gone though extra measures to keep certain fish, but as I said, I'm more into just doing the least amount of work in order to keep my hobby as a joy.

Also I am not familiar with the filter you are using. Personally I use sponge filters in my shrimp tanks because not only is there no chance of the babies being sucked up but the shrimp love to graze on them, they are great collectors of bio film. If your filter is a hob filter, then you might want to look into putting a prefilter sponge on the intake. I do this in the 55 gallon community in order not to suck up the live bearer fry. It's a bit more work than just having sponge filters since the prefilters require more rinsing to keep the flow going, but to me, not so much, just one of the things I do on tank day. You were wise in using an aged filter to cycle your tank, a trick I've used more than once, makes a big difference.
 
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richiep

The ph is where it is because op is using active substrait and there's nothing you can do to solve that now thats why I asked about the gh, if the gh is lower then I could recommend different shrimp, the fact theres no shrimp in the tank and that it far from being ready leaves it open to change once all the relevant information like gh is available, having said that cherries will live in ph 6.5 although over time will bring on health issues
 
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St4rving_4rtist

Ok, here's the problem - I have around 100+ cherry shrimp in a 5g bucket with an airstone waiting to go into the tank. The 20g was a rescue of sorts, as the previous owner had basically left it outside and never maintenced it - meaning it was coated with algae and had a huge colony of shrimp. I took the whole thing, replaced the substrate (which at the time was large, round river rocks, which were terrible) and added the new substrate. I'm trying to cycle the tank ultra-fast, as i'm not sure how much longer they can last in the 5g bucket .
 
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richiep

You're in a very difficult position, a new tank setup your looking at 3months before adding shrimp, going the short cut rout with an established filter i give it a month, but your up against it and the shrimp need to go somewhere, preferably in an established tank, if this is not possible and you have to drip them to your new setup you will have losses, leave them in the bucket and you will start to loose them, so its difficult for you which ever rout you take, barbiespoodle may have an idea ive mised.
 
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Flyfisha

I might be stating to obvious ?
You got a tank that had a thriving colony of shrimp that without doubt had a full working nitrogen cycle. But you didn’t like the look of it. You killed the cycle to make it look nice to your eyes. Now you have shrimp in a bucket without a cycle and a pretty looking tank without a cycle.

St4rving4rtist have you got another old established tank with just small fish in it but lots of plants?
 
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smee82

From your other thread about buying the tank the only thing you changed was the substrate and cleaned the algae of the glass. If thats true you should be able to reacclimate the shrimp to the new water and add them straight away without waiting as its technically not a new tank.
 
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ProudPapa

From your other thread about buying the tank the only thing you changed was the substrate and cleaned the algae of the glass. If thats true you should be able to reacclimate the shrimp to the new water and add them straight away without waiting as its technically not a new tank.

I'd agree with you if it wasn't for that low pH from the new substrate.
 
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St4rving_4rtist

I might be stating to obvious ?
You got a tank that had a thriving colony of shrimp that without doubt had a full working nitrogen cycle. But you didn’t like the look of it. You killed the cycle to make it look nice to your eyes. Now you have shrimp in a bucket without a cycle and a pretty looking tank without a cycle.

St4rving4rtist have you got another old established tank with just small fish in it but lots of plants?

Flyfisha, you are definently correct about the tank being established. My original plan was actually to change nothing about the tank and simply transport it, but when I saw how it was when I got there, I had to remove all the rock substrate as the shrimp were living underneath it and I needed to transport it by getting all the shrimp out. Otherwise, everything is the exact same, minus the substrate, which I (incorrectly) believed I could just change without issue. But no excuses, I did rush into this and changed it because I wanted it to look nice.

I do have one other established tank, to answer your other question, It's a 10g with 8ish zebra danios, so they could theoretically go in there.
 
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Flyfisha

At least put a good number in with the danios? If you want to?
A few years back I had danios and cherry shrImp together. I can’t recall the danios being persistent hunters?
I got caught out with the early style of ADA substrate , fish and my first tank so I sympathise with your situation.
 
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richiep

Flyfisha, you are definently correct about the tank being established. My original plan was actually to change nothing about the tank and simply transport it, but when I saw how it was when I got there, I had to remove all the rock substrate as the shrimp were living underneath it and I needed to transport it by getting all the shrimp out. Otherwise, everything is the exact same, minus the substrate, which I (incorrectly) believed I could just change without issue. But no excuses, I did rush into this and changed it because I wanted it to look nice.

I do have one other established tank, to answer your other question, It's a 10g with 8ish zebra danios, so they could theoretically go in there.
Why didn't you say this when I first said about putting them in an established tank you also say you revamped the tank apart from the filter which makes the tank newly cleaned which means theres no biofilm for the shrimp which dosnt make the tank stable,
 
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smee82

I'd agree with you if it wasn't for that low pH from the new substrate.
Yes but its still a heck of a lot better the a 5g bucket. With drip acclamation they should be ok.
 
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St4rving_4rtist

Apologies, I should have explained better, I did clean the glass but I tried to leave some of the algae still growing on the sides, and there is a good amount of visible algae that's around 1cm long growing off the plants, which I hoped would give them something to eat off. I've been mostly going off the advice of the guy at my LFS, who recommended me some driftwood which he said would have biological matter they could eat off of it, along with the plants, would be enough for the shrimp. The LFS's advice was just leave them in the bucket for a week, cycle the tank with Stability, then add them. Again, my big worry at the moment is the pH difference between the bucket (at around 6.8-7) and the tank (around 6.4). I don't want to add chemicals strait to the bucket, so I guess ill try "drip acclimation".
 
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richiep

Again a different picture could have been put on this had all the information been given at the start like plants, I also mentioned why your ph was low and to start adding chemicals to lower it will only complicate things as you've a active substrate lowering it to 6.5 is and if you add chemicals to raise it you get the two working against each other, I also mentioned to drip them into the low pH where they will live and breed if your gh is higher than gh5, I'd still like to know what your gh is if you can get a test done at your lfs as this could put a different picture on things again if its low , the only problems low ph is it affects the shrimp long term , on what as come to light with this tank is the fact it can hold shrimp and id have said this in the beginning had I known all the facts, what I would advise with the low ph is to drip them for at least 4hrs, I still think you may loose a few but you've no option, if you put them with the danios and they get a taste its good night, if you split them as Flyfisha mentioned that will give you a fall back if either goes pear shape.
I hope it goes well for you
 
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St4rving_4rtist

Thank you for your help everyone, patience is really the most necessary skill when it comes to this hobby, and I wish this hadn't turned into the mess its become. Ill try to get an update soon or if anything changes.
 
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