Are there any gouramis that won't breed in a community tank?

BlueRaccoon

I'm looking into the drawf gourami, Trichogaster Ialius, but I am open to other types. Will they breed in my community tank? I really don't want babies. Are there any types that I would have to be very intentional to breed?
 

BigManAquatics

Most fish babies in a community tank generally get ate, either as eggs or young fry. Easy snacks for most fish.
 

ruud

That and not raising the temperature to breeding conditions.
But with lalius, chances are you run into problems before they breed anyhow.
 

BlueRaccoon

That and not raising the temperature to breeding conditions.
But with lalius, chances are you run into problems before they breed anyhow.,
What do you mean by running into problems? What problems? Thank you so much.
 

kansas

They are vulnerable to disease and very aggressive with each other. It's hard to find females and the odds that they'll breed are much smaller than the odds that one will kill the other, I should say I've never kept that but that's what I read.
 

BlueRaccoon

They are vulnerable to disease and very aggressive with each other. It's hard to find females and the odds that they'll breed are much smaller than the odds that one will kill the other, I should say I've never kept that but that's what I read.
Wow, that's crazy! I have read that they are rather peaceful, and with a good sized tank the males should be fine. I planned to for 4-5 in a 55g. I don't know what ratio. I'm sure I could order females. I bet they would be more than willing to sell them to me.
 

kansas

Honey gourami (trichogaster chuna) are not as colorful but are hardier and get along well in groups.
 

BlueRaccoon

Honey gourami (trichogaster chuna) are not as colorful but are hardier and get along well in groups.
Yes, I am super interested in honies, but I don't know about the breed situation. I'm wondering if it's possible to discourage it.....
 

kansas

I have 4 in a heavily planted 55. As luck would have it, they are all females. I'll soon be getting some more, but have no choice about the gender. I don't read much about honeys breeding so I doubt it would be a problem, but obviously I can't speak from experiance.

Honeys are fun fish, they interact with each other but never inflict any real violence, unlike so many other fish.
 

BlueRaccoon

I have 4 in a heavily planted 55. As luck would have it, they are all females. I'll soon be getting some more, but have choice about the gender. I don't read much about honeys breeding so I doubt it would be a problem, but obviously I can't speak from experiance.

Honeys are fun fish, they interact with each other but never inflict any real violence, unlike so many other fish.
Thank you!
 

MacZ

a. In a community setting they might breed but with other fish (hint: especially tetras, barbs and rasboras) it's unlikely the fry grow up.
b. There are only two ways to keep fish from breeding.
One is giving them subpar conditions. But that means you might aswell put them down, because subpar conditions are inacceptable anyways.
The other is keeping only males or females and with gourami neither is a good idea.

You might also just have the wrong water parameters anyway so any breeding efforts of the fish might end unsuccessful anyway.
 

BlueRaccoon

a. In a community setting they might breed but with other fish (hint: especially tetras, barbs and rasboras) it's unlikely the fry grow up.
b. There are only two ways to keep fish from breeding.
One is giving them subpar conditions. But that means you might aswell put them down, because subpar conditions are inacceptable anyways.
The other is keeping only males or females and with gourami neither is a good idea.

You might also just have the wrong water parameters anyway so any breeding efforts of the fish might end unsuccessful anyway.
Thank you! Right, I don't want to put them in bad conditions. That's a great way to look at it.
 

MacZ

I can only give you one more advice: Do not rely on the other fish for population control. If it happens it happens, if it's successful it is successful. Got it?
 

BlueRaccoon

So let me ask this. If providing excellent conditions leads to fish breeding, what do you do with babies? I know most eggs will be eaten, but some will make it. A 55g can only hold so many.
 

MacZ

If providing excellent conditions leads to fish breeding, what do you do with babies? I know most eggs will be eaten, but some will make it. A 55g can only hold so many.
Simple. Most fish produce quite a number of eggs. In nature a fraction makes it. In captivity the same. If you have a tank appropriately stocked and decorated for honey gourami, with some barbs, rasboras and loaches, you should only see 1-2 fry make it per year.
Just don't feed extra until it's clear the juveniles will make it. And then rehome them. Do nothing to safe them or grow them out.
 

BlueRaccoon

Simple. Most fish produce quite a number of eggs. In nature a fraction makes it. In captivity the same. If you have a tank appropriately stocked and decorated for honey gourami, with some barbs, rasboras and loaches, you should only see 1-2 fry make it per year.
Just don't feed extra until it's clear the juveniles will make it. And then rehome them. Do nothing to safe them or grow them out.
I really appreciate it! I feel like there aren't tons of articles on exactly what happens to the fry. I mean like how many actually make it. Thank you so much.
 

MacZ

There are articles, actually. Just not on every species. But if the lifestyle of one species is similar to the others, you can expect these things to be similar as well.
Take sea turtles for example. They lay up to 200 eggs. Only a handful make it back to the beach they were born. Same goes for fish.
Disease, parasites, predation... hundreds of ways to die on their way to adulthood.
 

BlueRaccoon

There are articles, actually. Just not on every species. But if the lifestyle of one species is similar to the others, you can expect these things to be similar as well.
Take sea turtles for example. They lay up to 200 eggs. Only a handful make it back to the beach they were born. Same goes for fish.
Disease, parasites, predation... hundreds of ways to die on their way to adulthood.
Very true. Good point. I'm a bird watcher, and very few fledglings (baby birds who leave the nest) make it. Too many ways to die.
 

MacZ

I'm a bird watcher, and very few fledglings (baby birds who leave the nest) make it.
I worked in a nature reserve. I know what you mean.
 

kansas

Most wild animals don't live to breed even once.
 

chromedome52

Find a fish club. Used to be a lot of them, but the internet has killed many smaller local clubs. However, if you can find one within a couple of hours' drive, contact them and join. Even if you don't get to a lot of meetings, they will still have annual or semi-annual auctions, maybe even a show. The auctions are a good way to move smaller numbers of fish that you've raised, and the odds of them going to a knowledgeable aquarist are much greater. Most clubs have a mini-auction at the meetings as well, and you can sell off fish there, too. Advantage of meeting auction is you usually get paid in cash. Disadvantage is you will see something you want and have a chance of getting it for a bargain. Of course, this has started many a hobbyist down the path of Multiple Tank Syndrome!

Fish clubs serve more than one purpose. You get to socialize with other fish nuts face to face, hear talks or programs on various hobby related subjects, and participate in the auctions. You may even make some friends with whom you can trade fish. People do not get out to socialize as much as they used to, and this was getting to be a problem even before COVID. Clubs are finally starting to have in person meetings again, and socializing is important for good mental health.
 

BlueRaccoon

Find a fish club. Used to be a lot of them, but the internet has killed many smaller local clubs. However, if you can find one within a couple of hours' drive, contact them and join. Even if you don't get to a lot of meetings, they will still have annual or semi-annual auctions, maybe even a show. The auctions are a good way to move smaller numbers of fish that you've raised, and the odds of them going to a knowledgeable aquarist are much greater. Most clubs have a mini-auction at the meetings as well, and you can sell off fish there, too. Advantage of meeting auction is you usually get paid in cash. Disadvantage is you will see something you want and have a chance of getting it for a bargain. Of course, this has started many a hobbyist down the path of Multiple Tank Syndrome!

Fish clubs serve more than one purpose. You get to socialize with other fish nuts face to face, hear talks or programs on various hobby related subjects, and participate in the auctions. You may even make some friends with whom you can trade fish. People do not get out to socialize as much as they used to, and this was getting to be a problem even before COVID. Clubs are finally starting to have in person meetings again, and socializing is important for good mental health.
Thank you! This is great. I've never thought about a fish club!
 

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