Are There Any Air Stones With Super, Duper Tiny Bubbles?

Homeslice

Well Known Member
Messages
732
Reaction score
120
Points
78
I figured the more smaller bubbles the more air can get dissolved into the water, and I believe they will tend to pull more water than larger, few bubbles in sponge or hamburg-matten filter. Are there any known to have smaller/finer bubbles?

Thanks!
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
OP
H

Homeslice

Well Known Member
Messages
732
Reaction score
120
Points
78
Yes, have a look at Kordon mist air fine airstone. You really don't get air dissolving from the bubbles. The bubbles only move water to the surface where gas exchange happens.
Hope this helps.

Thank you! Are you sure about your conclusion? I thought someone posted a study in some other thread that like 75% of the dissolved oxygen in the water came from the bubble coming up, rather than surface agitation. COuld be 100% wrong though. Thanks, checking out Kordon now!!!
 

johnbirg

Valued Member
Messages
286
Reaction score
194
Points
213
Location
Adelaide South Australia
Experience
More than 10 years
The following explains it quite well.

Air stones

An air stone is a porous stone that is connected to an air pump to produce bubbles in an aquarium. Many think these pumps are too noisy and, therefore, choose not to use air stones. However, placing the pump on a sponge will usually dampen the noise significantly. Some hobbyists really like the look of a bubble wall in their aquarium and, therefore, use them even when further aeration is not needed. It is not actually the bubbles that provide the oxygen to the water (a common misconception), but it is their disturbance of the surface and ability to provide more water circulation that helps to raise the concentration of oxygen in the tank.
Source: Properly Aerating Your Aquarium | RateMyFishTank.com

I do agree that many small bubbles are likely to move a bit more water due to friction of the bubbles spread over the same water column.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Acei

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Points
1
I do not agree.
Oxygen is dissolved in water on the interface surface between the air and the water.
without the bubbles, that surface is just the upper surface of the water, while with bubbles, you add to that surface the combined surface of all the available bubbles which result a bigger total surface.
In such case, more oxygen is going to be dissolved in the aquarium water.
 

Thor555

Valued Member
Messages
93
Reaction score
57
Points
18
Location
New Orleans, LA
Experience
More than 10 years
My thinking is that a bubble ascending through the water column represents an air / water interface where O2 is exchanged. Ripples on the surface of the water also increase the surface area interface of the water with air - so the bubble also gives an added boost to O2 exchange when it hits the surface and causes agitation.
 

johnbirg

Valued Member
Messages
286
Reaction score
194
Points
213
Location
Adelaide South Australia
Experience
More than 10 years
Opinions are like bellybuttons everyone has one. The exerpt I quoted is from a scientific paper. Air is made up of nitrogen, oxygen, co2 and lots of inert gases. The interchange of gases with water depends on the spaces between the water molecules so O2 will fit faster than the larger CO2 molecules.
Any increase in the surface interaction of water with air will result in an increase of oxygenation.
 

AvalancheDave

Well Known Member
Messages
1,626
Reaction score
835
Points
148
Experience
More than 10 years
Opinions are like bellybuttons everyone has one. The exerpt I quoted is from a scientific paper.
ratemyfishtank.com is a scientific paper?

Here is the article, folks,

Properly Aerating Your Aquarium | RateMyFishTank.com

Air is made up of nitrogen, oxygen, co2 and lots of inert gases. The interchange of gases with water depends on the spaces between the water molecules so O2 will fit faster than the larger CO2 molecules.
Any increase in the surface interaction of water with air will result in an increase of oxygenation.
Oxygen is actually far less soluble in water than CO2 and solubility in water has little to do with the size of molecules but the fact that CO2 is polar while oxygen is not.

The common misconception is that bubbles only (or mostly) oxygenate by agitating the surface. This was disproven at least 27 years ago by an experiment that bubbled air or nitrogen. If it was true that bubbles oxygenate mainly or only due to surface agitation, dissolved oxygen levels would be the same or very similar regardless of the gas used:

aeration 6.png
 
Last edited by a moderator:

CHJ

Valued Member
Messages
229
Reaction score
122
Points
53
Experience
More than 10 years
I just dropped dried out terracota into a tank after it dried for a few nights. one piece spent 10 min putting our crazy small bubbles. So If I can find more pots from where ever I got that one, fill new ones with pool filter sand, silicone the bottom(top?) closed, then silicone an air hookup to the small hole (I could drill a hole through a nickle and silicone it down) I bet I can make a ton of tiny bubbles... and a cheap airstone.
Would I need an Alita/Jehmco to drive it? Sand would fill most of the space so pressure and volume needs would be reduced?
 
Toggle Sidebar

Water Change Frequency?

  • Daily

    Votes: 4 3.1%
  • Weekly

    Votes: 86 65.6%
  • Every Two Weeks

    Votes: 15 11.5%
  • Monthly

    Votes: 2 1.5%
  • As Needed (from test kit results or based on knowing your tank)

    Votes: 24 18.3%




Top Bottom