Are my Clown Loaches fighting?

Nancyhl

I just noticed my clown loaches doing something weird. I had never seen them doing that; I read somewhere that they fight to determine the leader, but I got them about 2 weeks ago and I hadn't seen them doing this. Is this what it is?

Also while I have you here can you also check out their color, is it a normal color? if not why would it be changing? I kind of see like a black kind of coat all over them; specially in one of them it looks too dark. I don't think they have the bright orange they should have.

Please help me with both issues!

This is the link to the video I took of their behavior and you can also see their color.
 

FishTankFreddy

Wish I had an answer. your tank looks great and those are some neat fish. I'm interested in this post... good luck
 

Nancyhl

Wish I had an answer. your tank looks great and those are some neat fish. I'm interested in this post... good luck ��

Thank you, hopefully someone familiar with the loaches would give me some advice.
 

AlyciaZu

Do you find that when they do that they go darker than usual?

I know when I used to have black banded leporinus they would do this almost exactly, but they would start out very vibrant in color like usual then within a few minutes they would turn VERY dark.
I always thought they were mating or doing some kind of mating play because they only did it once and a while for short periods of time.

I have loaches and have never seen them do this though.


 

Redshark1

Thanks for the video. The fish look great to me.

I purchased six Clown Loaches in 1995 so they are now approaching 21 years of age. For the first 18 years the two largest (the females) had fights like this at least weekly. It stopped when one of them became decisively bigger than the other. The four males had similar fights more occasionally.

Despite these fights, the fish settled down next to one another immediately afterwards and rested together. When fighting the fish can be seen "greying out" and this is the colour change you are referring to.

Be aware that the recommended aquarium size for Clown Loaches is now 6' x 2' x 2' !

I recommend reading more about Clown Loaches at Loaches Online
 

Nancyhl

Do you find that when they do that they go darker than usual?

I know when I used to have black banded leporinus they would do this almost exactly, but they would start out very vibrant in color like usual then within a few minutes they would turn VERY dark.
I always thought they were mating or doing some kind of mating play because they only did it once and a while for short periods of time.

I have loaches and have never seen them do this though.

They Just did it that one time, but I don't think they change colors. The colors you see in the video that's their usual color. I was also wondering why they don't look bright orange like they should do.

thanks
Thanks for the video. The fish look great to me.

I purchased six Clown Loaches in 1995 so they are now approaching 21 years of age. For the first 18 years the two largest (the females) had fights like this at least weekly. It stopped when one of them became decisively bigger than the other. The four males had similar fights more occasionally.

Despite these fights, the fish settled down next to one another immediately afterwards and rested together. When fighting the fish can be seen "greying out" and this is the colour change you are referring to.

Be aware that the recommended aquarium size for Clown Loaches is now 6' x 2' x 2' !

I recommend reading more about Clown Loaches at Loaches Online

thanks for your advice, I haven't seen them do that anymore. The color thing I was talking about is that they look a little dark all over and the orange color seems to have some sort of black coating over it; the colors you see in the video are their usual colors that's why I was wondering if those were normal colors.
 

Redshark1

OK I see what you mean. The colours are a product of the fishes age, their environment and the lighting.

I do believe the colours are more intense in the youngest fish.

I have found that dark colours in their environment make for darker Clown Loaches.
See this:

However, I still think that yours are normal although you could try replacing darker decor with lighter stuff.
 

Nancyhl

OK I see what you mean. The colours are a product of the fishes age, their environment and the lighting.

I do believe the colours are more intense in the youngest fish.

I have found that dark colours in their environment make for darker Clown Loaches.
See this:

However, I still think that yours are normal although you could try replacing darker decor with lighter stuff.

Awesome thank you for your advice, I guess my decor it is a little dark. I am not concern with their color I was worried that I might be doing something wrong with them, but as long as they are good I don't mind their color. Thanks again for sharing that link it was very helpful!
 

Redshark1

Your welcome. I could add a couple more tips for you to consider.

Whitespot: I would say always look out for whitespot, especially when adding new fish. Make sure you have ready access to fresh medication (if you choose to use it as well as the necessary temperature increase). I have found that keeping them at 80-82F seems to suit them and help them avoid it.

I value adding aeration. I do this with a venturI on a powerhead. It was quite noisy at first but then I hit on the idea of routing a long airline to another room, checking it ended up higher than the tank to avoid siphoning of the water. The fishes breathing is much more relaxed with it.

The most important thing I feel is water quality and learning how best to provide it. I have quite basic old fashioned filtration (undergravel) and I do a couple of 25% water changes a week with gravel vacuuming once a week. I tend to feed the minimum needed to keep good weight on the fish. I have had plenty of practice at this over the last 20 years but I believe my fish grew more slowly than those of other keepers.

Good external filtration may make providing good water quality easier but I traded this to have all the filtration in the tank to reduce leaks and the risk of losing my fish.
 

Nancyhl

Your welcome. I could add a couple more tips for you to consider.

Whitespot: I would say always look out for whitespot, especially when adding new fish. Make sure you have ready access to fresh medication (if you choose to use it as well as the necessary temperature increase). I have found that keeping them at 80-82F seems to suit them and help them avoid it.

I value adding aeration. I do this with a venturI on a powerhead. It was quite noisy at first but then I hit on the idea of routing a long airline to another room, checking it ended up higher than the tank to avoid siphoning of the water. The fishes breathing is much more relaxed with it.

The most important thing I feel is water quality and learning how best to provide it. I have quite basic old fashioned filtration (undergravel) and I do a couple of 25% water changes a week with gravel vacuuming once a week. I tend to feed the minimum needed to keep good weight on the fish. I have had plenty of practice at this over the last 20 years but I believe my fish grew more slowly than those of other keepers.

Good external filtration may make providing good water quality easier but I traded this to have all the filtration in the tank to reduce leaks and the risk of losing my fish.

thank you, I really appreciate it!
 

Redshark1

Your welcome. If you are aiming to keep your Clown Loaches for their 20+ years natural life span I'd recommend developing you aquarium for their benefit alone. They are well worth it. Good luck, and please come back here if you want to discuss future issues.
 

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