Are glofish just as hardy as zebra danios?

domingo3
Member
I'm in the process of fishless cycling. I'm going to wait until the tank is cycled before I buy fish, but wanted to get something hardy to start with. Are glofish just as hardy as zebra danios, or would they not be a good fish to start with? They're much more expensive, but if they're just as active and hardy and have such bright colors, I think it might be worth it. I just don't want to buy some $7 fish and lose them.

Thanks for any opinions
 
Aquarist
Member
Hello Domingo,

I have not read any information stating that the GloFish are not a hardy fish. I don't have personal experience with them though. Hang on I'm sure you'll get more responses before too long.
Ken
 
Danionins
Member
I purchased some a couple years back for the enjoyment of the grandkids... they are as tough as nails!

Dennis
 
David C
Member
They are the exact same as the danio in all regards. Because the process that changes their pigments only affects a select few genes, it has had no effect on the rest of their physiology. I know there is still much to understand about how individual gene changes can have undesirable and unintended effects, in this case the fish has been bred out 100's of generations so I'm confident any adverse effects would have been found by now.

Dave
 
  • Thread Starter
domingo3
Member
OK. Thanks. I'll be figuring out how to work them into my community then. I just don't want to have any fin nipping issues. Do they seem to care about color? The bright colors are nice, but it's kind of expensive to get 6 or more. Will the genetically modified ones school just find with some "cheap" zebra danios?
 
harpua2002
Member
Yes they will, but in general zebra danios are not tight schoolers.
 
CHoffman
Member
I had some too. I loved them. They are very pretty and like David said they are in every aspect just like the zebra danio. I would think that they would school together but I don't have prior experience to back that up. There is no magic number when it comes to school but from my experience the more you have the better they get along. I would say 5 or 6 is a great place to start.
 
e_watson09
Member
I agree with the posters above. Glofish are just like zebra danios and they are GREAT starter fish because they are actually one of the only fish that you do not need a heater for. But in general the glofish I've seen school but they are not like most other fish where as you'll always see them with atleast another of their kind. These guys like to have similar kind but they're not always with them. I've actually had some that prefer my group of mollies to their own. But they really are a fun and pretty fish to start with.
 
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domingo3
Member
OK. I wasn't looking for them to be in a tight school, but I read that having a group of them will cut down on them fin nipping other fish. I was thinking about neons and guppies, and didn't want them to get beat up. I also want to get some rainbow fish, but I don't think I have to worry about them getting pushed around.

Thanks
 
David C
Member
If you want a really tight schooling fish, you can always look at the harlequin rasboro. Not sure if the fish is what you want, but I have a school (10) and they swim in a very tight formation.

Dave
 
Gouramiguy17
Member
Neons are a schooling fish, although when fish aren't scared, they won't school most of the time. I had some harquieln rasboras and the only time they would school is when I had my hand in the tank or when I added my kribs. Schooling is a defense mechanism that is used to make the small fish look like a big fish.
 
e_watson09
Member
domingo3 said:
OK. I wasn't looking for them to be in a tight school, but I read that having a group of them will cut down on them fin nipping other fish. I was thinking about neons and guppies, and didn't want them to get beat up. I also want to get some rainbow fish, but I don't think I have to worry about them getting pushed around.

Thanks
Guppys and neon tetras are both a very bad fish to start with. When you first add fish to your tank you will start a cycle. During this cycle your chemical levels and change constantly and after about 30 days they should level off. To start this cycle you add fish and then you cannot add anymore fish until after the cycle is complete or they will probably die. You can also have a fish die during this time it is not uncommon at all. But you want to stick to Mollys, platies, swords, barbs, danios, and larger tetras (neons and glolights are both a bad choice as they are delicate). After the 30 day cycle you can add more fish including guppys and other delicate fish if they are compatible with the fish you have in the tank already.
 
bolivianbaby
Member
e_watson09 said:
Guppys and neon tetras are both a very bad fish to start with. When you first add fish to your tank you will start a cycle. During this cycle your chemical levels and change constantly and after about 30 days they should level off. To start this cycle you add fish and then you cannot add anymore fish until after the cycle is complete or they will probably die. You can also have a fish die during this time it is not uncommon at all. But you want to stick to Mollys, platies, swords, barbs, danios, and larger tetras (neons and glolights are both a bad choice as they are delicate). After the 30 day cycle you can add more fish including guppys and other delicate fish if they are compatible with the fish you have in the tank already.
The tank will have completed the nitrogen cycle before the fish are added to the tank.

Here's a link explaining it.
https://www.fishlore.com/aquariumfishforum/threads/four-methods-of-fish-less-cycling.48446/
 
e_watson09
Member

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