Are All Gender Tanks Bad?

Gar2188

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So I've heard that having an all male or all female tank is a bad thing. The reason being it's in a guppy's nature to breed and when it's not possible it can cause problems. Is this true?
 

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Gar2188 said:
So I've heard that having an all male or all female tank is a bad thing. The reason being it's in a guppy's nature to breed and when it's not possible it can cause problems. Is this true?
I have recently seen a post here about a female fish holding eggs without a male present to help her release it. I guess this situation is unnatural for the fish to undergo too often and could cause trouble. On the other side my male gourami is so into building bubblenest a day and night that I’m worried for him getting too tired from constantly defending it and chasing the females. Also the females are visibly stressed in long run. I’ll be separating them soon again.

So I would think it would vary on the fish species and their different risk factors when it comes to territorial behavior, aggression and natural spawning cycles and habits
 

Floundering_Around

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The only "problem" it would cause is males harassing each other however it doesn't damage the fish at all. All female tanks would take a bit more maintenance since the females are most likely pregnant and there would be the chance of having male offspring surviving
 

Mcasella

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All female tanks normally have a hierarchy different to the all male tanks. The males cavort and flirt with each other but as long as they have a good number they normally don't cause any harm (not even to fins), I had six males together (three nebula steel brothers, three feeder brothers) they worked well together, they got moved back with everyone else because there are fish in QT so they aren't needed in there (specially since the fish think of them as snacks, the ones previously in there were fine with them). Females that are wanting space to give birth might get a little bitey, however they are generally calmer and more people focused than the males.
 

emeraldking

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Keeping just males or females in one tank won't hurt. The thing that may happen is developing a hierarchy. So, you'll notice some dominant specimens within the group. No matter male or female...
 

Brannor

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We're going through this now... after starting with 1 tank and 16 adult guppies (5 male, 11 female) we lost 5 (4 female, 1 male) in the first 2 months (new tank) and got a second tank to move the males over. That happened this weekend... but not before they left us with 60+ fry and more on the way... I have noted how the boys are acting out a little now that there are no girls to chase, so will continue to monitor them. The girls are sooooo chilling out. During the siesta time (midday lights off) the girls all now gather in a formation near the back and nap together... it's quite cute. Peace and quiet from the males while 60+ fry swim around below them.

-G
 
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Gar2188

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Brannor said:
We're going through this now... after starting with 1 tank and 16 adult guppies (5 male, 11 female) we lost 5 (4 female, 1 male) in the first 2 months (new tank) and got a second tank to move the males over. That happened this weekend... but not before they left us with 60+ fry and more on the way... I have noted how the boys are acting out a little now that there are no girls to chase, so will continue to monitor them. The girls are sooooo chilling out. During the siesta time (midday lights off) the girls all now gather in a formation near the back and nap together... it's quite cute. Peace and quiet from the males while 60+ fry swim around below them.

-G
Interesting, I'd to hear more about their behaviour after some time apart.
 

jack22

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I've kept 2 male guppies in a 10 gal tank for 5 months. They don't seem to harass each other. Sometimes they'd swim together but mostly apart.

Yesterday, I added 2 females into the tank and I noticed that both the males and females tend to swim together more often.

So, not sure if the seemingly odd (living apart) behavior is because of all males or just not enough guppies. But not, with 4 guppies, they seem more social.
 

Floundering_Around

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Guppies aren't schooling fish, but they are gregarious (social). If you decide to keep both sexes, keep more females than males. While many people find this isn't as pretty, it will keep multiple males from harassing a single or few females to death.
 

radar

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I have a strain of Blue Moscow guppies and Red Moscow. I separate males and females. No problems in doing so I've encountered. I did have several batches of fry because they were prehit coming from breeder. I now have no new batches and by separating sexes will be able to selectively breed. I've had no problems keeping my males and females separated.
 

Brannor

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Gar2188 said:
Interesting, I'd to hear more about their behaviour after some time apart.
Well... The girls are still chilled. But the boys... well... it appears that after spending so much time with so many females to chase, that they are actually now...um... sexually frustrated that there are no adult female around and they've taken to try mate with each other... Our two blue males with the biggest tales are starting to get tears in their tales - likely due to one of the others nipping at them, or just from the stress of it.

It's a bit sad and troubling to watch... there is no way we're putting them back with the females... but they may end up harassing each other to death...

-G
 

Floundering_Around

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Brannor said:
Well... The girls are still chilled. But the boys... well... it appears that after spending so much time with so many females to chase, that they are actually now...um... sexually frustrated that there are no adult female around and they've taken to try mate with each other... Our two blue males with the biggest tales are starting to get tears in their tales - likely due to one of the others nipping at them, or just from the stress of it.

It's a bit sad and troubling to watch... there is no way we're putting them back with the females... but they may end up harassing each other to death...

-G
What's the ratio of males to females? If you have more females than males, it will reduce the constant chasing
 

Brannor

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Floundering_Around said:
What's the ratio of males to females? If you have more females than males, it will reduce the constant chasing
Hi @Floundering_Around, if you read my post further up you'll see that there is no ratio. We had separated the males and females about 4 weeks ago.

-G
 
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