Aquascape SOS

Dippiedee

Member
I dont know why I just cant get the hang of this aquascaping malarkey. I've rescaped my betta tank a million times and it never looks good. I see other tanks with 1 piece of wood and a few rocks and it looks absolutely stunning.

This is my progress (wont post every single attempt because youd be scrolling for days)


And then I rescaped today and created this:


..and I still dont like it. How can I make this tank look good? Should I bulk out the dwarf sag and spiralis val? Is it because my wood is ugly? Does the internal filter throw it off? Do I need more plants of different varieties? I dont like it but I cant put my finger on why. I need professional help any plant suggestions need to be able to survive in low light without CO2. I do dose liquid ferts

On the bright side the red cherry shrimp love the rock pile and all the cracks and hidey holes give them plenty of refuge from Prince
 
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AcornTheBetta

Member
Dippiedee said:
I dont know why I just cant get the hang of this aquascaping malarkey. I've rescaped my betta tank a million times and it never looks good. I see other tanks with 1 piece of wood and a few rocks and it looks absolutely stunning.

This is my progress (wont post every single attempt because youd be scrolling for days)


And then I rescaped today and created this:


..and I still dont like it. How can I make this tank look good? Should I bulk out the dwarf sag and spiralis val? Is it because my wood is ugly? Does the internal filter throw it off? Do I need more plants of different varieties? I dont like it but I cant put my finger on why. I need professional help any plant suggestions need to be able to survive in low light without CO2. I do dose liquid ferts

On the bright side the red cherry shrimp love the rock pile and all the cracks and hidey holes give them plenty of refuge from Prince
Maybe something like this:

I know I know it's a masterpiece. It was done on the most expensive medium, Microsoft paint and took me a whole 30 seconds *cough* I mean days.
Ok so basically, the wood is in the middle with all the while stones built up and scattered around it (don't make it look forced). On the top branches, there are the anubias glued down to make it look like a tree. From there you can add other elements, but this is a base layout. LMK if you don't like it and I will think of another design and make another brilliant piece of art.
 

mattgirl

Member
You are limiting your workable space by having that filter inside this tank. The first thing I would have to do is replace it with a HOB (hang on back filter). Then I would use something to cover the back of the tank to hide the filter.

I would remove at least half the white rocks and showcase the piece of wood by showing more of it and attaching more plants to it. Maybe some type of moss on the upper limbs. Give it time for the plants to grow in. It is going to look a bit empty until the plants grow and fill in. I am not at all partial to seeing pothos roots in any of my tanks. To me they are an eyesore. You may like them though so keep 'em if you do.

Check this out. It shows what time and patience will do when you are growing plants.
 

Betta'sAnonymous

Member
Or, if you were into sponge filters like i am, i modified a piece of my scape for the filter to set inside of it and still be effective. It is kind of hidden by a plant, but the filter is inside the skull on the left side of the pic.
 

AggressiveAquatics

Member
I really liked the look of the second pic I would have kept that maybe with a few more plants
 
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Dippiedee

Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Maybe something like this:

I know I know it's a masterpiece. It was done on the most expensive medium, Microsoft paint and took me a whole 30 seconds *cough* I mean days.
Ok so basically, the wood is in the middle with all the while stones built up and scattered around it (don't make it look forced). On the top branches, there are the anubias glued down to make it look like a tree. From there you can add other elements, but this is a base layout. LMK if you don't like it and I will think of another design and make another brilliant piece of art.
Picasso, this you?

I've seen people do this tree concept before and I quite like it. The wood in the tank is too seperate bits so I'd probably have to glue them together or something, but this is a pretty good idea I'll have a look and see if its plausible.

mattgirl said:
You are limiting your workable space by having that filter inside this tank. The first thing I would have to do is replace it with a HOB (hang on back filter). Then I would use something to cover the back of the tank to hide the filter.

I would remove at least half the white rocks and showcase the piece of wood by showing more of it and attaching more plants to it. Maybe some type of moss on the upper limbs. Give it time for the plants to grow in. It is going to look a bit empty until the plants grow and fill in. I am not at all partial to seeing pothos roots in any of my tanks. To me they are an eyesore. You may like them though so keep 'em if you do.

Check this out. It shows what time and patience will do when you are growing plants.
My tank was made to house my ackie monitor lizards babies back when I used to breed them so the top of the tank was designed as like sliding doors like a vivarium. Do you think a HOB would work with the tank? Heres a picture


Betta'sAnonymous said:
Or, if you were into sponge filters like i am, i modified a piece of my scape for the filter to set inside of it and still be effective. It is kind of hidden by a plant, but the filter is inside the skull on the left side of the pic.
I've never used a sponge filter before but if a HOB wont work on my tank I'm thinking that the sponge is probably the best way to go. I like that you cant see it, filters are such eyesores
 

AcornTheBetta

Member
Dippiedee said:
Picasso, this you?

I've seen people do this tree concept before and I quite like it. The wood in the tank is too seperate bits so I'd probably have to glue them together or something, but this is a pretty good idea I'll have a look and see if its plausible.



My tank was made to house my ackie monitor lizards babies back when I used to breed them so the top of the tank was designed as like sliding doors like a vivarium. Do you think a HOB would work with the tank? Heres a picture




I've never used a sponge filter before but if a HOB wont work on my tank I'm thinking that the sponge is probably the best way to go. I like that you cant see it, filters are such eyesores
Yes indeed! Ok sounds good.
 

mattgirl

Member
Dippiedee said:
My tank was made to house my ackie monitor lizards babies back when I used to breed them so the top of the tank was designed as like sliding doors like a vivarium. Do you think a HOB would work with the tank? Heres a picture
I can see where it would if you could leave one side of the sliding top open.
 

A201

Member
IMO, In the end a successful, awsome aquascape comes down to "Rocks". A well constructed & designed hardscape provides the base in which plants & driftwood enhance.
Unfortunately not just any rock will do. Look for ones with flat bottoms, interesting curves, crevasses & holes.
Another challenge is proportion.
Just my two cents.
 

Bluebellie

Member
The second one looks really nice. Add just a few carpeting plants, and maybe move the farthest to the right rock (the one with the hole). Maybe tilt it slightly to the left like the other two pictures.
I really like that rock by the way.


I personally don’t like the look of black substrate and white rocks (on the other pictures).
 

jake37

Member
Many people post pictures of tanks they love (or other loves) that i dislike. Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. I'd post a picture of one of my tank but what's the point. Btw i would add a red or brown crypt to give the tank a little colour. It should probably be off center towards the rear on the right side and i would 2nd getting rid of that filter in the tank and maybe putting a small sponge filter in the tank. Not sure about the hob (depends on tank size). You can easily hide a small sponge filter with plants and similar and instead of taking up a huge area of the tank it can become part of the landscape. The risk with a hob - depending on tank size - is impact on water flow. I'm not a fan of piled rocks or rocks in general with the exception of african tanks. Occasionally slanted slate across driftwood makes a wonderful cave/hiding spot.
 
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Dippiedee

Member
So I went to LFS and spent a small fortunate on stuff to rescape. I got some hornwort, amazon sword, straight val, elodea and more wood. I'm hoping I can transform the tank lol
 

emilymg

Member
I really love the second pic actually. Maybe if you switch to a HOB with that sort of scape and incorporated more background plants like water wisteria or rotala rotundifolia it would look really nice. Also, if you don’t love your wood piece (i do ) you could almost cover it in java moss....it would look really natural this way.
 

theTBoss

Member
emilymg said:
I really love the second pic actually. Maybe if you switch to a HOB with that sort of scape and incorporated more background plants like water wisteria or rotala rotundifolia it would look really nice. Also, if you don’t love your wood piece (i do ) you could almost cover it in java moss....it would look really natural this way.
 
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Dippiedee

Member
Okay so I've finished my rescape... I know it might not be everyone's cup and tea but I really love it now. The water is still a bit cloudy from water changing and stirring up the sand.
 

BabsandLoon

Member
AggressiveAquatics said:
I really liked the look of the second pic I would have kept that maybe with a few more plants
I agree! I was thinking the same thing when I looked at your pics. I really loved that second one. It just needed a few more plants.

Dippiedee said:
Okay so I've finished my rescape... I know it might not be everyone's cup and tea but I really love it now. The water is still a bit cloudy from water changing and stirring up the sand.
Great job!
 

mattgirl

Member
Dippiedee said:
Okay so I've finished my rescape... I know it might not be everyone's cup and tea but I really love it now. The water is still a bit cloudy from water changing and stirring up the sand.
I love what you've done with the white rocks. I actually love what you've done with the whole tank but instead of overpowering, the rocks are now very nice accents.
 
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Dippiedee

Member
Since I've left the tank to settle 2 cherry shrimp have died... when the tank was empty and I was vacuuming they were all swimming around as normal. Could the rescape have stressed them too much?
 
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Dippiedee

Member
She looks better in daylight
 

mattgirl

Member
I have to ask. Is that an avocado tree I see growing back behind this tank? It's been years since I've had one so I might not be remembering the leaves correctly.
 
  • Thread Starter

Dippiedee

Member
mattgirl said:
I have to ask. Is that an avocado tree I see growing back behind this tank? It's been years since I've had one so I might not be remembering the leaves correctly.
Yes it is I tried to grow one out of the tank but the seed rotted, not sure if it was the seed or the tank that was the problem
 

emilymg

Member
Dippiedee said:
She looks better in daylight
Wow! I really love it....you did amazing
 

mattgirl

Member
Dippiedee said:
Yes it is I tried to grow one out of the tank but the seed rotted, not sure if it was the seed or the tank that was the problem
You would think it would have grown just as well out of the tank as it did submerged half way in a glass. I would think just as long as the top half is out of water it would have sprouted. It might be worth it to try another seed in the tank. If the second one rots away then we have to think they don't care for tank water.
 
  • Thread Starter

Dippiedee

Member
mattgirl said:
You would think it would have grown just as well out of the tank as it did submerged half way in a glass. I would think just as long as the top half is out of water it would have sprouted. It might be worth it to try another seed in the tank. If the second one rots away then we have to think they don't care for tank water.
That's what I thought as the one in the picture I had in a glass of water until the roots were a couple of inches then potted it in soil, so I'm leaning toward it being a bad seed. I have an avocado ripening atm so I'll give it another go soon
 

mattgirl

Member
Dippiedee said:
That's what I thought as the one in the picture I had in a glass of water until the roots were a couple of inches then potted it in soil, so I'm leaning toward it being a bad seed. I have an avocado ripening atm so I'll give it another go soon
If this second one does sprout in the tank it is going to be interesting to find out if one can survive long term in just water. Like you, I always planted mine in soil after they got good roots so don't know if they would have lived long term in just water.
 

V1K

Member
That filter is so huge in comparison to the tank, and I think it's a bit of an eyesore. I'd either change it to something less huge, or hide it with a perimeter of thick plants.

Edit: Which now I see you already did. Looks much better!
 

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