Aquarium Planting

pyrxl

HI so I’m taking an attempt at a planted tank. I really want it to be carpeted while having some background plants as well. Any ideas on how to approach it? Should I grow the carpet seeds first and then add the background plants?
 

kallililly1973

Never did carpet plants my light isn’t strong enough but personally I like the looks of stem plants like bacopa and lower light plants like amazon swords java fern and Anubis... do your research u may need high light and possibly co2 to get a good carpet but I’m sure a true plant pro will chime in with more advise .. good luck!!
 

EbiAqua

Plant as heavily as you can afford to, from the start.

Don't use carpeting plant "seeds". Half the time they aren't aquatic, or they turn out to be something like Hygrophila polysperma, which, depending on your region, may be illegal as it is highly invasive in the US.

MOST carpeting plants will require powerful lighting, CO² injection, a nutrient rich substrate and regular fertilizer supplementation. ALL plants benefit from this but it is not always necessary.

You will need long tweezers or pinsettes, a spray bottle full of distilled water (dechlorinated tap is fine but leaves water deposits), and patience.

Your substrate should ideally be about an inch and a half deep minimum, and planting the tank dry with just the substrate moistened ensures plants don't come uprooted and float as easily.

If your substrate isn't nutrient dense or is inert such as gravel or sand, your plants will need root tabs to supplement nutrients. I recommend using a high quality comprehensive fertilizer at least once a week as well.
 

pyrxl

Thanks for the info! My plant light strength it’s 6500K and I’m trying to grow Glossostigma Elatinoides. Is it strong enough? Following up on the growing part, should I grow out the Glossostigma Elatinoides first and then add in other plants later?
 

-Mak-

Thanks for the info! My plant light strength it’s 6500K and I’m trying to grow Glossostigma Elatinoides. Is it strong enough? Following up on the growing part, should I grow out the Glossostigma Elatinoides first and then add in other plants later?
Are you getting them tissue cultured? They'll likely be in their emersed form and a dry start as Fahn described would be beneficial. However glosso is more of a high tech plant, so injected CO2 after submersing is highly recommended.

6500K isn't the strength, it's just the color temperature - how warm or cool it looks to human eyes. Plants don't have human eyes so they don't care about K. Light for plants is measured in PAR, or photosynthetically active radiation. Maybe you could tell us which light it is, there may be info on it online
 

Lynn78too

Agreeing with planting as many of the carpet plants as possible in the beginning. If you want that beautiful lush carpet like the pictures you need good light, good substrate, consistent fertilizer and preferably CO2. You don’t have to have it all but realize that those carpets don’t happen with adequacy.
 

Bryangar

Are you getting them tissue cultured? They'll likely be in their emersed form and a dry start as Fahn described would be beneficial. However glosso is more of a high tech plant, so injected CO2 after submersing is highly recommended.

6500K isn't the strength, it's just the color temperature - how warm or cool it looks to human eyes. Plants don't have human eyes so they don't care about K. Light for plants is measured in PAR, or photosynthetically active radiation. Maybe you could tell us which light it is, there may be info on it online
How would plants do in 18000k+?
 

EbiAqua

How would plants do in 18000k+?
Ok, a little explanation about color temperature.

Humans can only see a tiny sliver of the light spectrum, dubbed "visible light". We measure visible light on a spectrum. On the left, light waves are low frequency and give off a reddish light. On the far right, it becomes more blue with high frequency waves.

While it is true that the intensity of the light determines good plant growth, they also photosynthesize more efficiently under different color spectrums.

Technically, the best lighting for plants is high intensity red light! This is why a lot of commercial greenhouses use red and violet lighting.

However, red aquariums don't particularly look nice. We want them to be within a slI'm band of the visible light spectrum that produces white light. This extends from around 5000k, having a yellowish tint, to around 20000k, being a searing white-hot bluish tint.

Plants do best in the range of about 6500k to 8000k. These spectrums are balanced for growth, visibility and are aesthetically pleasing to the eye.

18000k will be very bright, white-hot, and have a bluish tinge. Lights of this output and spectrum are usually reserved for reef tanks, where the emulated bright tropical sunlight filtering through water fuels coral growth. In a freshwater environment, it might just supercharge algae growth.
 

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