29 Gallon Tank Aquarium Grass

Nielfo

I've been doing a lot of reading on cover plants for fry. Everything seems to be coming back to dwarf hairgrass. can anyone tell me
their experience with this plant? Does it need additional co2? does it spread out on its own? would one plant in a 29 gal. aquarium be
enough to start it spreading?
 

Mudminnow

Does it need additional co2? does it spread out on its own? would one plant in a 29 gal. aquarium be
enough to start it spreading?
In my experience, it doesn't always need extra CO2, but it will be much healthier, happier, and easier to grow with it. If you don't want to get a CO2 system (totally worth the expense in my opinion), you could try a dirt tank. When the organics in the dirt break down, they release some CO2. I've seen hairgrass grow in other people's dirt tanks.

If it's growing, it should spread on it's own. But, it will grow and spread much slower in a low tech tank.

Hairgrass can work in a 29 gallon provided you give it what it needs: light, carbon, fertilizers. One plant (assuming your talking about a typical pot's worth) would take a long time to cover the substrate of a low tech 29 gallon. Plus, it would be hard to balance a tank with so few plants. Meaning, you would need a lot of experience and know how to pull that off without running into algae issues and other problems.

I have grown hairgrass in high tech and low tech tanks. In my opinion, the toughest thing about hairgrass in a low tech tank is getting it established. Given the plant isn't getting all the carbon it would like, it has trouble getting started in a low tech tank. I would guess using the dry start method would help with this. I've successfully used this method with other ground covering plants.

If you're new to growing plants, and your goal is to create cover for fish fry in a low tech tank, I think you would be better off choosing another kind of plant. Something like guppy grass or java moss would be a whole lot easier to pull off.
 
Upvote 0

Latest threads

Top Bottom