Aquarium Critique And Suggestions

AustinS
  • #1
HI guys,

First off, excuse the mess! A bladder or pond snail (not sure which) hitchhiked on one of my plants and those are all his descendants (I have an assassin snail who's somewhat taking care of them), and I have some leftover brown algae from when I left the lights off when I was away for vacation.

Anyways, What do you guys think about my aquarium in its current state? This is my first aquarium. Please be brutally honest, and it'd be great if you'd let me know what you like and dislike about it along with how you think I can improve it. I'm also looking to add some stem plants in the back to make things look a little better and so my fish will feel a little more comfortable swimming higher up, they always chill at the bottom where there's cover and it's a little crowded down there. Any recommendations for stem plants? Also, I plan on tying the anubias nana to the driftwood in the center.

Here's what my aquarium currently holds:

- 11 neon tetra
- 9 silvertip tetra
- (planning to add 3-5 otos)
- sword plant
- dwarf sagitteria
- anubias nana
- way too many snails

Thanks in advance! Heres some pictures:


upload_2018-7-3_18-23-59.png
upload_2018-7-3_18-24-17.png
upload_2018-7-3_18-24-35.png
 

Advertisement
Lorekeeper
  • #2
First off, I love the open scape. It's wide open, lots of room for fish to swim in and for plants to grow, and I approve.

For stem plants in the back, I personally really like the Fire Amazon Swords. I know you've already got a sword or two, but the fire variety is really fun.

I'd recommend filling your tank up a bit more, since that's at least a gallon or two of water that you're missing out on.

Just know that if you get otos in the future, they can be very finicky. You could get 5 and none could make it. You just need to keep trying until you get a good batch.
 

Advertisement
AustinS
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
First off, I love the open scape. It's wide open, lots of room for fish to swim in and for plants to grow, and I approve.

For stem plants in the back, I personally really like the Fire Amazon Swords. I know you've already got a sword or two, but the fire variety is really fun.

I'd recommend filling your tank up a bit more, since that's at least a gallon or two of water that you're missing out on.

Just know that if you get otos in the future, they can be very finicky. You could get 5 and none could make it. You just need to keep trying until you get a good batch.

Thanks for the advice, I'll be sure to check out the Fire Amazon swords! If only those pesky snails would stop eating the swords I currently have, they grow new leaves like crazy but they never last long, lol!
 
Lorekeeper
  • #4
Most snails don't eat through plant leaves. In fact, most "pest" snails are actually a pretty good clean up crew. They're just disliked for their population sizes.

More than likely, the swords are having another issue causing them to die off IMO.
 
AustinS
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Most snails don't eat through plant leaves. In fact, most "pest" snails are actually a pretty good clean up crew. They're just disliked for their population sizes.

More than likely, the swords are having another issue causing them to die off IMO.

Well the snails used to only eat the browning leaves back when I was too stubborn to get a decent light but I suspect they're getting hungry enough to eat the good stuff. If you look at the second picture there are quite a few healthy (at least the look healthy) green leaves with holes all over them, and the sword behind the driftwood especially has lots of new growth. I'll take what you said into consideration though, it's been quite a while since I've put root tabs in there.
 
JenniferB
  • #6
First.....fill up the tank. lol It might just be me, but I really dislike seeing the water line on a tank.
Second…..is that anubias buried in the sand? If so, get it out. They don't need or like being buried.
Third.....I think taller background plants would be great to give some scale and dimension. If you are looking for some fast growth some bulb plants might be worth looking into. My personal favorite is aponogeton ulvaceus. I don't know why, I just really love it.

I am not a snail expert. I specifically buy tissue culture plants so that I do not have to deal with snails. I kind of want a nerite or two....but I also really don't want to deal with them escaping. Snails in general freak me out. Hopefully someone else has a good idea of how to get rid of them more quickly. I have seen people post about snail traps using a water bottle and such. Worth a try.
 

Advertisement
AustinS
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
First.....fill up the tank. lol It might just be me, but I really dislike seeing the water line on a tank.
Second…..is that anubias buried in the sand? If so, get it out. They don't need or like being buried.
Third.....I think taller background plants would be great to give some scale and dimension. If you are looking for some fast growth some bulb plants might be worth looking into. My personal favorite is aponogeton ulvaceus. I don't know why, I just really love it.

I am not a snail expert. I specifically buy tissue culture plants so that I do not have to deal with snails. I kind of want a nerite or two....but I also really don't want to deal with them escaping. Snails in general freak me out. Hopefully someone else has a good idea of how to get rid of them more quickly. I have seen people post about snail traps using a water bottle and such. Worth a try.

I've already filled the tank more since Lorekeeper recommended it, and as far as the anubias, it's there only temporarily in the sand because I don't have anything to tie it to the driftwood at the moment, but I will soon. I very much agree with you with the taller background plants, I've just been debating what plant to choose. I'll definitely consider the aponogeton ulvaceus, what a unique looking plant! I've never heard of or seen it before. Thanks!
 
JenniferB
  • #8
Just make sure that only the roots and not the actual rhizome is buried on the anubius….or it will rot. When I needed to keep mine down temporarily I used a hair pin to hold it down on the surface of the substrate. lol It worked.
 
imba
  • #9
it looks good.

personally, I would prefer more hardscape. Maybe more rocks or a larger driftwood on the left side and attach some more anubias or bucephalandra?

To add abit more colour, maybe some Alternanthera reineckiI for the midground? And some Jungle Vals for the background?

All these are easy to grow plants!
 
aussieJJDude
  • #10
I agree with above poster... but I suggest AR minI instead of AR - more suited to mid ground then AR...

Since its a small tank, I suggest plants with fine or small leaves to keep to scale. Blyxa and pearlweed (h. glomeratus, incorrectly known as h. micranthemoides) are some that come to mind. American val is another suitable alternative.
 

Advertisement
-Mak-
  • #11
Yes, to be honest more hardscape would look better. Rocks and wood are the backbone of any nature style aquascape. There must be bones in order to build the muscle and skin (plants).

Also, not just in aquascaping but in visual art in general, a basic rule/guideline is the rule of thirds. Focal points such as that piece of wood are placed at thirds points, so at 1/3rds or 2/3rds of the tank.
-
- rule3_1.jpg
- Aquascape Analysis of George Farmer's One-Pot IwagumI - ScapeFu

This entire series is a good intro to hardscaping!
 
AustinS
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
it looks good.

personally, I would prefer more hardscape. Maybe more rocks or a larger driftwood on the left side and attach some more anubias or bucephalandra?

To add abit more colour, maybe some Alternanthera reineckiI for the midground? And some Jungle Vals for the background?

All these are easy to grow plants!

I agree with above poster... but I suggest AR minI instead of AR - more suited to mid ground then AR...

Since its a small tank, I suggest plants with fine or small leaves to keep to scale. Blyxa and pearlweed (h. glomeratus, incorrectly known as h. micranthemoides) are some that come to mind. American val is another suitable alternative.

Wow, Jungle Vals look great! I'll definitely look into getting some, thanks for the suggestions guys!

EDIT: Also, I think it's a great idea to put a larger piece of driftwood to the left. Is there a type of wood anyone would recommend that will work will with my current piece of driftwood? most of what I see is skinny and spider-y so it doesn't really match.
 
AustinS
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
I took some hardscaping advice did a little remodeling, what do you guys think? It looks a little barren now but I'm planning on putting corkscrew val in the back (especially the corners) and I'm still trying t0 decide what plants to put in the front. Hope you guys like it!


upload_2018-7-6_16-17-46.png
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
13
Views
155
SawyerDawn
  • Question
Replies
9
Views
419
Pwilly07
  • Question
Replies
4
Views
336
StarGirl
Replies
17
Views
439
Katie993
Replies
4
Views
331
JLAquatics
Advertisement





Advertisement



Back
Top Bottom